Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • "male leisure" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The rise of ‘suburban neurosis’?
Brad Beaven

4 Male leisure in the industrial suburb, 1918–39: the rise of ‘suburban neurosis’? I n 1919 a number of cities and towns across Britain were shaken by outbreaks of fierce civil unrest.1 Although the immediate causes for the disturbances varied, it had become abundantly clear to the local civic elite that the nineteenth-century vision of social citizenship lay in ruins. This failure was most apparent in the expanding cities in the Midlands and Southeast, which had witnessed some of the most vigorous attempts to implement schemes of social citizenship between

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Brad Beaven

7 Male leisure and citizenship in the Second World War I t is perhaps fitting that in a book which considers male leisure and notions of citizenship, the final chapter should investigate the impact of the Second World War on working communities. Never before had the leisure of the working class been so systematically scrutinised by the state through a network of intelligence officers and researchers. The era of total war had propelled the civilian to centre stage and the British Government watched nervously to see how he or she would respond to enemy bombardment

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Author: Brad Beaven

This book analyses the development of male leisure against the changing notions of citizenship which underpinned perceptions of British society during the period 1850-1945. It opens with an examination of the 'leisure' problem of the middle decades of the nineteenth century. After the defeat of Chartism and associated challenges to the employers' right to organise the workplace, factory owners, the clergy and philanthropists established schemes of rational recreation designed to attract and educate working-class males. The book explores how schemes of rational recreation attempted to create the model citizen and the impact of these strategies on male working-class leisure. Taking three influential leisure activities - drink, the music hall and association football - the book explores their impact on both concepts of citizenship and male leisure patterns. In addition, commercial leisure also highlighted the marked gender divides in leisure activities found within working-class households. The book investigates the generational issues that shaped male working-class leisure. The increase in non-apprenticed semi-skilled work, particularly in the 'new' industry regions, raised fears that monotonous working practices and new leisure activities were a dangerous social cocktail. Moreover the book investigates how, during the late Victorian and early Edwardian era, the problem of a 'degenerate' youth became entwined with anxieties over the future of empire. It further contextualises male leisure against the dominant concerns between 1918 and 1945. This era saw the suburbanisation of British cities, continued anxieties over male citizenry and increased international tensions that led to war.

Abstract only
Brad Beaven

Introduction During the 1930s a series of conferences were held in Britain to discuss the ‘problem’ of leisure and citizenship. ‘Tell me how a man spends his leisure time and I will tell you what sort of a man he is’ was the common cry from the platform.1 Such a statement would not have been out of place in the mid-nineteenth century as leisure and citizenship had long been elevated to a position of national importance. To be precise, it was male leisure which generated the most concern. The 1867 Reform Act, which allowed a proportion of skilled working men to

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Abstract only
Brad Beaven

Conclusion Contemporary discussion on the future of citizenship and male leisure between 1850 and 1945 was a fluid discourse, filtered through wider anxieties that gripped society at the time. While popular leisure patterns were often seen as an obstacle to ‘good’ citizenship, appropriate ‘rational’ leisure was perceived as the antidote to urban degeneracy. The book’s focus on the Midlands has revealed that the citizenry were perceived as much as a problem in ‘boom towns’ as in poverty-stricken areas that have traditionally been associated with schemes of cultural

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Brad Beaven

became inevitable that working-class recreation would attract the interest of social reformers and philanthropists. Accordingly, during the mid-nineteenth century, clubs, societies and leisure activities were founded by urban and rural elites anxious to provide civilising recreation for the masses. Although this was not a coherent or organised movement, schemes such as these became known collectively as rational recreation. This chapter will investigate the impact that rational recreation had upon working-malesleisure, during a period in which there was a heightened

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Mark Hampton

Post-war Hong Kong was not merely an arena for developing capitalism, modernisation, and good governance; it was also a site for leisure. Above all, Hong Kong was described as a venue for male leisure. This included recreating institutions familiar from home, such as sport and clubs, and allowing a wider range of sexual opportunity than the UK did, even in an era of “permissiveness”. Commentators, including for example Ian Fleming, described Hong Kong as a place in which European and American men could enjoy easy access to Asian women’s bodies, thanks to the conjunction of poverty and a traditional desire of Asian women to please men. The archetype of such a woman was Richard Mason’s character Suzie Wong. Whereas the enjoyment of heterosexual opportunity required a moderate amount of discretion, homosexual liaisons—criminal offenses for most of the Colonial period—required virtual secrecy. The latter point is illustrated by the death of police inspector John MacLennan.

in Hong Kong and British culture, 1945–97
A continuity in lifestyle
Brad Beaven

suspicion of official clubs among male youths during the interwar period. This mistrust was often exhibited through either boycotting youth movements in favour of informal clubs, or joining organisations for their sports and leisure facilities rather than the values espoused. The advantage of the unofficial club was that it had been established from within working-class communities and provided male youths with a foothold into adult male leisure activities found in the traditional working-men’s clubs. Certainly, the unofficial clubs provided a recognisable frame of reference

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Women and leisure time in A City Girl (1887) and In Darkest London (1891)
Eliza Cubitt

). The children’s determination to play is a small and temporary act of defiance in an atmosphere in which discussions of leisure are focused on ‘issues of control over space and regulation of behaviour’ (Beaven, 2005: 39). The children’s game of ‘building houses with the stones and bricks’ suggests Harkness’s self-­conscious criticism: it implies that the developers of Charlotte’s Buildings have been merely playing at reform (Law, 1890: 22). Superfluous male leisure results in the parasitic indolence of the loafers, the men who idle outside pubs and who allow women to

in Margaret Harkness
Female werewolves in Werewolf: The Apocalypse
Jay Cate

werewolf that is always, in some way, female. If the anecdotal and localised statistics are to be believed, less than a third of Apocalypse ’s players (and, by extension, characters) are female. RPGs remain, in both the popular imagination and the testimony of players, a predominantly male leisure activity. Thus Apocalypse is, perhaps, a unique cultural production: it is a

in She-wolf