Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for :

  • "mass psychology" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Mass and Propaganda. An Inquiry Into Fascist Propaganda (Siegfried Kracauer, 1936)
Nicholas Baer

Written in French exile, the following text by Siegfried Kracauer from December 1936 outlines a research project that the German-Jewish intellectual undertook with funding from the Institute for Social Research. The work outlined here would be a study of totalitarian propaganda in Germany and Italy through sustained comparison with communist and democratic countries, especially the Soviet Union and the United States. Appearing in English translation for the first time, this document from Kracauer‘s estate is crucial for a full understanding of his career as a sociologist, cultural critic, film theorist and philosopher, demonstrating the global scope of his engagement with cinema, mass culture and modernity.

Film Studies
Abstract only
Turning towards a radiant ideal
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

entirely private individualistic, psychologistic matter for the subject as existential monad pursuing his/her individual self-interested actions in an unlimited market of possible partners. In this Aristophanes’ formulation anticipates the mass psychology of neoliberalism, the utilitarianism of our ‘present circumstances’ – that ‘the nearest approach to such a union’ would be ‘best for all’. Recent sociology’s investigations find love in modernity very much in the grip of Aristophanes’ premises: Giddens’s (1992) account of the intensified search for true love under

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Abstract only
The Historiography of Fascist Studies
Thomas Linehan

supposed that there were links between people’s sexual behaviour and their political preferences. This supposition had its basis in the Freudian idea that people’s sexual behaviour provided vital clues to their inner personality and character. Wilhelm Reich, in The Mass Psychology of Fascism ( 1933 ), contended that in fascism, individuals found a compensatory outlet for their sadomasochistic and aggressive behaviour that was rooted, in turn, in bourgeois sexual repression. 8 Erich Fromm’s Escape From Freedom (1941), too, argued that people fled from bourgeois

in British Fascism 1918-39
Open Access (free)
Towards a teleological model of nationalism
David Bruce MacDonald

(London: Mercury Books, 1962) pp. 1–2. Henry Tudor, Political Myth (London: Pall Mall Press, 1972) pp. 14–15. Ibid. pp. 138–9. Ibid. p. 36. Dušan Kečmanović, The Mass Psychology of Ethnonationalism (New York: Plenum Press, 1996) p. 62. George Schöpflin, ‘The Functions of Myth and a Taxonomy of Myth’, in Hosking and Schöpflin (eds), Myths and Nationhood, pp. 32–3. William Pfaff, The Wrath of Nations: Civilization and the Furies of Nationalism (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993) p. 53. Peter Alter, Nationalism (London: Edward Arnold, 1992) p. 10. Kečmanović, The Mass

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
Confronting relativism in Serbia and Croatia
David Bruce MacDonald

make the same mistakes all over again. NOTES 1 Northrop Frye, The Great Code: The Bible and Literature (Toronto: Academic Press, 1982) p. 169. 2 William Pfaff, The Wrath of Nations: Civilisation and the Furies of Nationalism (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993) p. 53. 3 Dušan Kečmanović, The Mass Psychology of Ethnonationalism (New York: Plenum Press, 1996) pp. 68–9. 4 Conor Cruise O’Brien, God Land: Reflections on Religion and Nationalism (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988) pp. 1–4; 7; 26. 268 2441Concl 16/10/02 8:06 am Page 269 Conclusions

in Balkan holocausts?
Paradoxes of democracy
Brian Elliott

understanding of the political that seeks to constitute ‘the people’ through the articulation of common demands. If populism can be understood in such democratic terms, what is it that gives rise to the generalized condemnation of contemporary populism? In answer to this question Laclau ( 2005 ) cites Gustave Le Bon’s book Psychology of Crowds ( 2009 ), first published in 1895, as a key exhibit. The notion central to Le Bon’s social theory is that the assemblage of the crowd and consequent constitution of mass psychology represents significant cultural regression. Laclau

in The roots of populism
David Bruce MacDonald

–20. 7 Marcus Tanner, Croatia: A Nation Forged in War (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1997) p. 214. 8 The issue is discussed in: Jonathan Glover, Humanity: A Moral History of the Twentieth Century (London: Cape, 1999) p. 129. 9 Branka Magaš, The Destruction of Yugoslavia: Tracing the Breakup 1980–92 (London: Verso, 1993) p. 110; and Christopher Cviić, ‘Who’s to Blame for the War in ExYugoslavia?’, World Affairs, (Fall 1993) p. 73. 10 Kenneth R. Minogue, Nationalism (London: B. T. Batsford, 1967) pp. 25–8. 11 Dušan Kečmanović, The Mass Psychology of

in Balkan holocausts?
Anna Green and Kathleen Troup

of historical materialism, with group psychoanalysis. 19 In The Mass Psychology of Fascism , written in the early 1930s, Reich synthesized the theories of Freud and Marx. He argued that Nazism, like all political movements, was grounded in the psychological structure of the German masses, in particular of the lower middle class. This group was anxious due to their increasing poverty in the face of depression and German war debts. Lower-middle-class fathers were authoritarian, and able to repress their children sexually on account of the correspondence of familial

in The houses of history
Freedom, democracy and liberalism
John Carter Wood

. There was a need for ‘democratic ways of living for little men in big societies’, i.e. ‘a host of little democracies’ where ‘the spirit of neighbourhood and personal acquaintance’ could live. This would enable ‘real democracy’ instead of its ‘atomistic perversion’. 105 Oldham later used similar terms to assert that the individual – ‘torn from his roots in an organic social life’ – had become ‘an isolated atom in a largely formless mass, swayed by mass emotions’, and he linked Mannheim’s and Cole’s views on social ‘hugeness’ and mass psychology. 106 Such concerns

in This is your hour
Egalitarianism and elitism
John Carter Wood

democracy’; instead, Britons were ‘in danger of acquiring too much of the psychology of the mob’: ‘the mentality of the casual street crowd is just what gives the dictator his chance; a little flighty and eager for sensation, uncritical and easily moved, and above all irresponsible’. 24 In 1941, Oldham, in a CNL essay, asserted that ‘mass psychology pervades all classes’, but he focused on the better-off: It is characteristic of the members of the wealthy, cosmopolitan crowd who in time of peace in London

in This is your hour