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The Early Promise and Disappointing Career of Time-Lapse Photography
David Lavery

Time-lapse photography—the extremely accelerated recording and projection of an event taking place over an extended duration of time—is almost as old as the movies themselves. (The first known use of time-lapse dates from 1898.) In the early decades of the twentieth century, cineastes, not to mention scientists, artists, and poets, waxed eloquently on the promise of time-lapse photography as a means for revealing “things we cannot see,” and expanding human perception. This essay examines time-lapses tremendous initial imaginative appeal for such figures as Ernst Mach, Germaine Dulac, Jean Epstein, Rudolf Arnheim, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, and Collette, and speculates about the possible reasons for its diminution over the course of the century.

Film Studies
Abstract only
Point of view and communication
James Zborowski

(London: Gordon Fraser, 1976), p. 126. 7 G. Perez, The Material Ghost: Films and Their Medium (London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), p. 250. See also G. Perez, ‘House of miscegenation’, London Review of Books 32:22 (2010), p. 24. 8 J. W. Carey, Communication as Culture: Essays on Media and Society. Revised Edition (Abingdon: Routledge, 2009), pp. 11–28.

in Classical Hollywood cinema
James Zborowski

, Vertigo, p. 41. 75 J. Harvey, Movie Love in the Fifties (Cambridge: Da Capo Press, 2001), p. 34. 76 G. Perez, The Material Ghost: Films and Their Medium (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), p. 75. 77 Branigan briefly presents such an argument, including a useful comment about the ideological element of defining perception as normal or abnormal, in Point of View in the Cinema: A Theory of Narration and Subjectivity in Classical Film (Berlin: Mouton, 1984), pp. 78–9. 78 Branigan, Point of View in the Cinema, p. 79. 79 Smith, Engaging Characters

in Classical Hollywood cinema
James Zborowski

in mind is of course Far From Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002). The question of how fully that film conforms to the conventions of an earlier phase of Hollywood filmmaking (the subject of my master’s dissertation) is not one I will explore here. 18 Gilberto Perez takes issue with the treatment of Aristotle’s terms by recent narratologists. See G. Perez, The Material Ghost: Films and their Medium (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), pp. 59–60. 19 G. Genette, Narrative Discourse, trans. J. E. Lewin (Ithaca: Cornell University Press), p. 164 (original

in Classical Hollywood cinema
James Zborowski

, The Material Ghost: Films and Their Medium (London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), p. 77. Communication, love, death  109 32 Wilson, Narration in Light, p. 104. 33 Perez, Material Ghost, pp. 77–8. 34 Wilson, Narration in Light, pp. 103–4. 35 R. Wood, ‘Letter from an Unknown Woman: the double narrative’, CineAction 31 (1993), p. 9. 36 Perkins, ‘Same tune again!’, p. 46. 37 Wood, ‘Letter from an Unknown Woman’, p. 10. 38 T. Modleski, ‘Time and desire in the woman’s film’, Cinema Journal 23:3 (1984), p. 29. 39 S. White, The Cinema of Max Ophuls

in Classical Hollywood cinema
Film theory’s foundation in medievalism
Bettina Bildhauer

Panofsky (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1979 [1946]), pp. 19–20; Norbert Nussbaum, German Gothic Church Architecture , trans. Scott Kleager (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000 [1985]), e.g., p. 112. 24 Gilberto Perez, The Material Ghost: Films and Their Medium (Baltimore: Johns

in Medieval film
Andrew Klevan

diverting him. He repeatedly persists, and she repeatedly rolls her head back and forth in avoidance (Fig. 3.41). This goes on and on – on my counting eighteen of his attempts to kiss her are shown – as she becomes ever more distressed to the point of petrified catatonia. This is continuing even as the scene fades to black which enhances its never-ending quality; 95  Perez’s chapter on Godard in The Material Ghost is entitled ‘The Signifiers of Tenderness’ (1998). 96  The English language title of the film is My Life to Live. 97  As mentioned in Part II, ‘relevance’ to

in Aesthetic evaluation and film