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Place, locality and memory
Author: Tony Kushner

This book is a study of the history and memory of Anglo-Jewry from medieval times to the present and explores the construction of identities, both Jewish and non-Jewish, in relation to the concept of place. The introductory chapters provide a theoretical overview focusing on the nature of local studies. The book then moves into a chronological frame, starting with medieval Winchester, moving to early modern Portsmouth, and then it covers the evolution of Anglo-Jewry from emancipation to the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the impact on identities resulting from the complex relationship between migration (including transmigration) and the settlement of minority groups. Drawing upon a range of approaches, including history, cultural and literary studies, geography, Jewish and ethnic and racial studies, the book uses extensive sources including novels, poems, art, travel literature, autobiographical writing, official documentation, newspapers and census data.

Jews in Portsmouth during the long eighteenth century
Tony Kushner

analyse the nature of an intriguing, if sometimes troubled, community of Port Jews, and its complex and multi-layered image inside and outside of Portsmouth. Ultimately it will explore why particular memories of Portsmouth Jewry – as both a part of and apart from the town’s dangerous ‘sailortown’ community – were so persistent in the nineteenth century and beyond. As was the case with the Jews of medieval Winchester, the representation of Portsmouth Jewry had, through the workings of place identity, a wider significance beyond the locality in question. Returning to

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
Abstract only
Constructing the city of memories
Tony Kushner

‘local’ being shaped by, amongst others, notions of race, Christianity, nation and Empire. All these factors have influenced the memory and representation of medieval Winchester Jewry, acting as both forces for inclusion and exclusion in the construction of place identities. Moreover, the existence of many intriguing sites of memory – both physical and literary – have, as we will see, enabled a variety of readings of Winchester’s past in relation to the Jewish presence. Memory, as Yerushalmi reminds us, ‘is always problematic, usually deceptive, sometimes treacherous

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
Abstract only
Tony Kushner

one of itinerancy. When human society was rooted, we didn’t have a sense of a place as being a place, because anything that wasn’t that place wasn’t in the world.’ 8 In contrast, this study has placed particular emphasis on movement and flux throughout the past, and not simply in the modern era, and the concomitant constant making and remaking of local identities in relation to the outside world. In medieval Winchester (Hardy’s Wintoncester), for example, the settlement and then removal of the Jews prompted the change in street name from Scowertenestret to Jewry

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
Tony Kushner

-cultural ‘modern examples’ should be put alongside the medieval Winchester Bible, Winchester Cathedral and Portchester Castle with ‘watercress soup, trout, and Brown Bread and Honey Ice Cream’ in making up the ‘the culture of Hampshire’. 60 There are, however, some rules of entry for ‘outsiders’ if they are to be included within Mason’s idea of Hampshire. The first is contribution , requiring at least some degree of integration in the county. In this respect, one Hampshire family of refugee origin – the Portals – has been referred to regularly. Henri de Portal came to

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
Teresa Phipps

: Exeter in the late fourteenth century’, in Barbara A. Hanawalt (ed.), Women and Work in Preindustrial Europe (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986), p. 156. 7 Derek Keene, Survey of Medieval Winchester , vol. 1 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1985), p. 249. 8 Rodney Hilton, ‘Women traders in medieval England’, in Hilton, Class Conflict and the Crisis of Feudalism , revised edn (London: Verso, 1990), p. 135. 9 Casson, ‘Reputation

in Medieval women and urban justice
Episcopal authority and the reconciliation of excommunicants in England and Francia c.900–c.1150
Sarah Hamilton

’s gate in Exeter see HMC Report on Manuscripts in Various Collections IV (Dublin, 1907), nos. 283, 287, pp. 49, 56. E.g., Winchester: D. Keene, Survey of Medieval Winchester (Oxford, 1988), pp. 108, 574, 579–80. I must thank Christopher Norton for pointing out to me that the cathedral close was often referred to as the cemetery in York documents

in Frankland
The archaeology and history of an English leprosarium and almshouse
Simon Roffey

monumenta , Vol. III (London: Society of Antiquaries, 1796). 31 Ibid ., pp. 1–17. 32 I.e. Victoria County History ( VCH) , Victoria County History of Hampshire , Vol. II ( London : HMSO , 1973 ). 33 T. Beaumont James , English Heritage Book of Winchester , 2nd edn ( London : Batsford , 2007 ); D. Keene , Survey of Medieval Winchester , Winchester Studies, 2 ( Oxford : Oxford University Press , 1985 ), p. 19 . However, as we shall see, the archaeological evidence places the origins of the hospital at least a century earlier, and probably pre

in Leprosy and identity in the Middle Ages
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

Course , Woodbridge, 2012. 6 See especially: D. Keene, Survey of Medieval Winchester , Winchester Studies, 2, 2 vols, Oxford, 1985 . The survey began in 1961, and is ongoing. Significant precedents for the topographical work of this project were the model documentary studies of W. Urry, Canterbury

in Towns in medieval England
Teresa Phipps

Keene, Survey of Medieval Winchester , vol. 1 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1985), p. 395. 4 Philippa C. Maddern, Violence and Social Order: East Anglia 1422–1442 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), p. 9; Barbara Hanawalt, Crime and Conflict in English Communities, 1300–1348 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1979), pp. 13–17. See also Sara M. Butler, The Language of Abuse: Marital Violence in Later Medieval England (Leiden: Brill, 2007), p. 6. 5

in Medieval women and urban justice