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A genealogical enquiry
Małgorzata Jakimów

this story of how urbanisation formed citizens, there is rarely a chapter authored by those who live in the shadows of the city. They are the ones who are given their voice only once they rise, change and move, and once they become fully urban, as if their own experience of what came before is irrelevant. In the Chinese context, these marginal experiences are the experiences of rural migrant workers. Suspended in the world of in-between – not yet fully urban, but already delinked from their rural home – migrant workers are at the forefront of shaping new forms of

in China’s citizenship challenge
Anne Ring Petersen

The artist as migrant worker The burgeoning of contemporary art, and ideas about art, from non-Western countries is altering previous expectations of art created outside Westerndominated art scenes, and with the increasing prominence of non-Western art comes the need for profound changes in the Western-dominated methodologies and perspectives of curators, critics and art historians.1 Art today is on the move, and so are the perspectives on it. Or they should be if we are to develop decolonising and ‘de-Westernising’ art historical approaches, which not only

in Migration into art
Labour NGOs and the struggle for migrant workers’ rights

In twenty-first-century Chinese cities there are hundreds of millions of rural migrants who are living temporary lives, suspended between urban and rural China. They are the unsung heroes of the country’s ‘economic miracle’, yet are regarded as second-class citizens in both a cultural, material and legal sense. China’s citizenship challenge tells the story of how civic organisations set up by some of these rural migrants challenge this citizenship marginalisation. The book argues that in order to effectively address the problems faced by migrant workers, these NGOs must undertake ‘citizenship challenge’: the transformation of migrant workers’ social and political participation in public life, the broadening of their access to labour and other rights, and the reinvention of their relationship to the city. By framing the NGOs’ activism in terms of citizenship rather than class struggle, this book offers a valuable contribution to the field of labour movement studies in China. The monograph also proves exceptionally timely in the context of the state’s repression of these organisations in recent years, which, as the book explores, was largely driven by their citizenship-altering activism.

Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

housing reconstruction grant conditions (NRA). Deviation from these would require additional engineering design, which is largely unattainable for the affected households. This has the potential to disrupt restoration of family livelihoods and rural economy. This has very serious implications in a country where many able-bodied youth and men have migrated abroad in search of jobs or are employed as migrant workers, leaving the burden on women-headed households to sustain themselves and their families with home-based income generation activities. Repair and retrofit

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

Social-Cohesion Regime in Lebanon’s Halba ’, Journal of Refugee Studies , 33 : 1 , 224 – 44 . Chalcraft , H. ( 2009 ), The Invisible Cage: Syrian Migrant Workers in Lebanon ( Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press ). Chambers

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Małgorzata Jakimów

spatial strategies of migrant workers’ struggle for urban citizenship (see Swider, 2015 ; Kochan, 2019 ; Qian and Zhu, 2014 ; Qian and He, 2012 ; Ren, 2012 ), these observations have yet to transpire in political science's discussions of migrant workers’ activism, which are dominated by the focus on labour and/or resistance to the state. This is important because the claim areas of civic organising and labour do not really address migrant workers’ marginalisation within the cities and their figurative and legal exclusion from urban citizenship. Neither labour nor

in China’s citizenship challenge
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Labour non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the citizenship challenge
Małgorzata Jakimów

incomprehensible dialects. The exceptionally blue October sky was soon marred by dust rising from the road. Two hours later, as I finally exited the bus, I witnessed an alternative urban landscape. A collection of low-rise houses, many of them derelict, the stray dogs staring at me, and dust swirling in the air from noisy scooters passing by. Walking through the village's labyrinth of alleyways, I managed to find my way to the place I was looking for: a local migrant worker-founded NGO – New Beijing Workers (NBW). 1 Greeted by a

in China’s citizenship challenge
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Citizenship challenge, social inequality and the insecure state
Małgorzata Jakimów

migrants and peasants, are not only barred from attaining the material fruits of their contribution to this modernisation project, they also remain under-represented in the political decision-making process. Without political voice, migrant workers must rely on the whims of the policy-makers, who may occasionally improve their situation by introducing new possibilities of acquiring urban hukou , but who at the same time may take arbitrary decisions to displace hundreds of thousands of people overnight, as it happened in December 2017 in Beijing

in China’s citizenship challenge
Małgorzata Jakimów

In November 2017, a fire claimed nineteen lives in an overcrowded building in Daxing, one of the most densely migrant-inhabited districts of Beijing. Shortly afterwards, an estimated 100,000 migrant workers labelled as ‘low-end population’ were thrown out into the bitter Beijing winter as urban villages in Daxing and other parts of the city were razed in the forty-day crackdown on ‘illegal housing’ (Phillips, 2017 ). The city authorities justified the destruction of urban villages, as in previous cases of similar removal, on the grounds of

in China’s citizenship challenge
Young people in migrant worker families in Ireland
Naomi Tyrrell

2 ‘Of course I’m not Irish’: young people in migrant worker families in Ireland Naomi Tyrrell The volume of research on (and with) migrant children and young people has been increasing in recent years but this often focuses on migrants who are deemed to be particularly vulnerable (see White, Ní Laoire, Tyrrell et al., 2011), such as those seeking asylum, and tends to portray a narrow definition of who migrant children and young people are. At the same time, the popular concept of transnationalism and the study of migrants’ lives across borders have been

in Spacing Ireland