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The military in British art, 1815-1914

In an age when engraving and photography were making artistic images available to a much wider public, artists were able to influence public attitudes more powerfully than ever before. This book examines works of art on military themes in relation to ruling-class ideologies about the army, war and the empire. The first part of the book is devoted to a chronological survey of battle painting, integrated with a study of contemporary military and political history. The chapters link the debate over the status and importance of battle painting to contemporary debates over the role of the army and its function at home and abroad. The second part discusses the intersection of ideologies about the army and military art, but is concerned with an examination of genre representations of soldiers. Another important theme which runs through the book is the relation of English to French military art. During the first eighty years of the period under review France was the cynosure of military artists, the school against which British critics measured their own, and the place from which innovations were imported and modified. In every generation after Waterloo battle painters visited France and often trained there. The book shows that military art, or the 'absence' of it, was one of the ways in which nationalist commentators articulated Britain's moral superiority. The final theme which underlies much of the book is the shifts which took place in the perception of heroes and hero-worship.

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J.W.M. Hichberger

‘Of all the phases of Art, there is none so barren as the Military, and none in which English painters have found themselves so peculiarly abroad.’ 1 William Michael Rossetti’s comment summarises two related contemporary mythologies; that military art was a ‘barren’ area of activity and that British artists were unwilling and unable to work on the subject. These two beliefs were interwoven with the

in Images of the army
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J.W.M. Hichberger

. Desanges and the ‘Victoria Cross series’ The British painter Louis William Desanges was important, as Barker had been, in assimilating French military art into British subject matter. Desanges working for a middle-class audience, transformed middle class gentlemen into ‘god-like’ military heroes. Despite his name, Desanges was a London artist, born in 1822. His antecedents were

in Images of the army
Visualising a changing city

Delving into a hitherto unexplored aspect of Irish art history, Painting Dublin, 1886–1949 examines the depiction of Dublin by artists from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Artists’ representations of the city have long been markers of civic pride and identity, yet in Ireland, such artworks have been overlooked in favour of the rural and pastoral, falling outside of the dominant disciplinary narratives of nationalism or modernism. Framed by the shift from city of empire to capital of an independent republic, this book chiefly examines artworks by of Walter Frederick Osborne (1857–1903), Rose Mary Barton (1856–1929), Jack Butler Yeats (1871–1957), Harry Aaron Kernoff (1900–74), Estella Frances Solomons (1882–1968), and Flora Hippisley Mitchell (1890–1973), encompassing a variety of urban views and artistic themes. While Dublin is renowned for its representation in literature, this book will demonstrate how the city was also the subject of a range of visual depictions, including those in painting and print. Focusing on the images created by these artists as they navigated the city’s streets, this book offers a vivid visualisation of Dublin and its inhabitants, challenging a reengagement with Ireland’s art history through the prism of the city and urban life.

Charles Bartles

innovations will now require planning to be conducted on a global level for the aerospace and informational aspects of war. This planning is driving Russian force structure and capabilities development. Changing thinking about military art In Russian parlance, military science is a system of knowledge about the laws of war, the military-strategic nature of war, ways of averting war, the preparation of the armed forces and the country for war, and methods of conducting armed struggle. The term “military art” refers

in Russian Grand Strategy in the era of global power competition
J.W.M. Hichberger

, as a prelude to gaining admittance to the Royal Academy schools. His first experience of military art was to paint a panorama of the Franco-Prussian War, 1869–70. He went to Paris, with a forged passport, to gather sketches and information. In this, his first adventure, he showed the resourcefulness and disregard of authority which was to characterise his career as a war artist. After five years

in Images of the army
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J.W.M. Hichberger

’s ‘vulgarity’ with Vernet, seems outraged equally by the picture and the type of audience it attracted. By working in a frankly more commercial style and in a more commercial environment Barker put himself outside the Academic environment. His career indicates that the new forms of military art which were being evolved in the 1850s met with considerable resistance from elements of the Academic hierarchy

in Images of the army
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Michael Brown and Joanne Begiato

in Romantic Military Art (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2013). 14 Jeremy Black, Naval Power: A History of Warfare and the Sea from 1500 Onwards (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009); N. A. M. Rodgers, The Safeguard of the Sea: A Naval History of Britain, 660–1649 (London: Penguin, 1997); N. A. M. Rodgers, The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, 1649–1815 (London: Penguin, 2004); Brian Lavery, Nelson’s Navy: The Ships, Men and Organisation 1793–1815 (London: Conway, 1989). 15 N. A. M. Rodgers, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (Glasgow

in Martial masculinities
David E. Omissi

. Calwell emphasized that hill warfare, a ‘special branch of the military art’, created outstanding difficulties for regular soldiers. The hillmen, often experienced warriors, knew the terrain far better than the regulars. Armies supplied by pack transport crawled slowly through the roadless mountains, while hilltop marksmen extracted a steady toll of lives. Mountain winters were severe; and nature also

in Air power and colonial control
Chris A. Williams

these forces, but they were a sustained attempt to move in the direction of such a society. Notes  1 Matthew McCormack, ‘Dance and drill: Polite accomplishments and military masculinities in Georgian Britain’, Cultural and Social History, 8:3 (2011), 315–330; Dandeker, Surveillance, power and modernity, p. 158.  2 Foucault, Discipline and punish, p. 152–153; Smith has critiqued the Foucauldian aspects of military discipline from a historical perspective, but his analysis of it is unconvincing, since it bases itself in developments in military art (notably the

in Police control systems in Britain, 1775–1975