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Peter J. Martin

Chap 3 10/7/06 11:49 am Page 32 3 Over the rainbow? On the quest for ‘the social’ in musical analysis Introduction In the previous chapter it was suggested that many of the challenges to the ‘old’ ways of musicology derive from the assertion that the study of music must recognise the inescapably social nature of the creation, performance and reception of music. While there may indeed be much to be gained in a technical sense by removing the creature – in this case the musical work – from its natural habitat and dissecting it in the laboratory, the essence

in Music and the sociological gaze
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Culture and memory after the Armistice
Editors: Trudi Tate and Kate Kennedy

This book revisits the end of the First World War to ask how that moment of silence was to echo into the following decades. It looks at the history from a different angle, asking how British and German creative artists addressed, questioned and remembered the Armistice and its silence. The book offers a genuinely interdisciplinary study, bringing together contributions from scholars in art history, music, literature and military history. It is unique in its comparison of the creative arts of both sides; assessing responses to the war in Britain, Germany and Austria. Together, the different chapters offer a rich diversity of methodological approaches, including archival research, historical analysis, literary and art criticism, musical analysis and memory studies. The chapters reconsider some well-known writers and artists to offer fresh readings of their works. These sit alongside a wealth of lesser-known material, such as the popular fiction of Philip Gibbs and Warwick Deeping and the music of classical composer Arthur Bliss. The wide-ranging discussions encompass such diverse subjects as infant care, sculpture, returned nurses, war cemeteries, Jewish identity, literary journals, soldiers' diaries and many other topics. Together they provide a new depth to our understanding of the cultural effects of the war and the Armistice. Finally, the book has a recuperative impulse, bringing to light rare and neglected materials, such as the letters of ordinary German and British soldiers, and Alfred Doblin's Armistice novel.

Art worlds and cultural production
Author: Peter J. Martin

This book explores the interface between musicological and sociological approaches to the analysis of music, and in doing so reveals the differing foundations of cultural studies and sociological perspectives more generally. Building on the arguments of his earlier book Sounds and society, the author initially contrasts text-based attempts to develop a ‘social’ analysis of music with sociological studies of musical activities in real cultural and institutional contexts. It is argued that the difficulties encountered by some of the ‘new’ musicologists in their efforts to introduce a social dimension to their work are often a result of their unfamiliarity with contemporary sociological discourse. Just as linguistic studies have moved from a concern with the meaning of words to a focus on how they are used, a sociological perspective directs our attention towards the ways in which the production and reception of music inevitably involve the collaborative activities of real people in particular times and places. The social meanings and significance of music, therefore, cannot be disclosed by analysis of the ‘texts’ alone, but only through the examination of the ways in which music is a constituent part of real social settings. This theme is developed through discussions of music in relation to processes of social stratification, the collaborative activities of improvising musicians, music as language, music as a ‘cultural object’ and music in everyday social situations.

Toward a musical poetics of The Smiths
Jonathan Hiam

(Buckingham: Open University Press, 1993); G. Boone and J. Covach (eds), Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis (New York: Oxford, 1997); W. Everett (ed.), Expressions in Pop-Rock Music: A Collection of Critical and Analytical Essays (New York: Garland, 2000). See also S. Frith, ‘Why Do Songs Have Words?’, Music For Pleasure: Essays in the Sociology of Pop (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1988), pp. 105–28, and W. Everett (ed.), Rock Music: Critical Essays on Composition, Performance, Analysis, and Reception (New York and London: Garland, 2000). 2 For an introduction to

in Why pamper life's complexities?
Charles Barr

structural or ‘musicalanalysis of this scene, as of the previous one, one would need to do more than put in a lot of crude blobs or ‘notes’ –​taking into account also the precise length of each shot, and also the ‘scale’ of shot, the loudness of the close-​up against the quieter long shots. For fully accurate notation, a film print rather than a DVD would be necessary, in order to measure the number of frames, which would mean working from a 35mm archival film print. This is exactly what David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson do, in recent editions of their now

in Partners in suspense
Open Access (free)
An introduction
Erik Hedling

Democratic welfare state in which he worked. By contrast, Tapper maintains that Bergman was himself a Social Democrat and that his films, including the Djursholm trilogy, were in fact deeply critical of the bourgeoisie, all in the radical spirit of Strindberg and Ibsen. Thematics The analyses in chapters 14 – 17 focus on various recurring thematic aspects of Bergman’s films that are not discussed in the preceding chapters. While not performing a musical analysis, Linda Haverty Rugg presents a pioneering

in Ingmar Bergman
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‘This grave day’
Trudi Tate and Kate Kennedy

diversity of methodological approaches, including archival research, historical analysis, literary and art criticism, musical analysis and memory studies. The chapters reconsider some well-known writers and artists (Virginia Woolf and Käthe Kollwitz, for example) to offer fresh readings of their works. These sit alongside a wealth of lesser-known material, such as the popular fiction of Philip Gibbs and Warwick Deeping and the music of classical composer Arthur Bliss. The wide-ranging discussions encompass such diverse subjects as infant care, sculpture, returned nurses

in The silent morning
Open Access (free)
Singing or speaking or both?
Håkan Lundström and Jan-Olof Svantesson

linguists has a long history. When the ethnomusicologist Steven Feld analysed this field of research in 1974, he found that [i]nterest thus far in the language–music relationship occurs at two distinct levels; one being the overlap of musical and linguistic phenomena, the other being the possibilities of applying linguistic models to musical analysis. 12 In his study of the Kaluli people in Papua New Guinea, Feld worked with a combined

in In the borderland between song and speech
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Childhood, sexuality and The Smiths
Sheila Whiteley

musical analysis, and research into historical and cultural data remain important, meaning is always at issue. There is no one scientifically ‘true’ account of the music, but rather a sense of collective complicity: is this story plausible,17 is my interpretation plausible, and is the report in The Sun simply sensationalist journalism? Handsome devils or fallen angels? My initial discussion focuses on four tracks that appear to contain paedophiliac connotations, so relating to my particular interest in sexuality and to issues concerning child-centred lyrics: the

in Why pamper life's complexities?
Open Access (free)
The soundscape of Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night
Alexis Luko

and vocalizations. 16 The first part of this chapter examines musical themes that delineate tragicomic aspects of protagonists and also demonstrates how music aids in expressing linkages and ruptures between characters. Here, music is the ultimate manifestation of the ‘invisible’ strings that interconnect characters. The second part includes a musical analysis of the flurry of sonic events that lead to Henrik’s attempted suicide. Here, music plays a powerful role as a prime cinematic force in underlying

in Ingmar Bergman