Critical essays on Bernard Herrmann and Alfred Hitchcock

For a decade from 1955, Alfred Hitchcock worked almost exclusively with one composer: Bernard Herrmann. From The Trouble with Harry to the bitter spat surrounding Torn Curtain, the partnership gave us some of cinema’s most memorable musical moments, taught us to stay out of the shower, away from heights and never to spend time in corn fields. Consequently, fascination with their work and relationship endures fifty years later. This volume of new, spellbinding essays explores their tense working relationship as well as their legacy, from crashing cymbals to the sound of The Birds.

The volume brings together new work and new perspectives on the relationship between Hitchcock and Herrmann. Featuring new essays by leading scholars of Hitchcock’s work, including Richard Allen, Charles Barr, Murray Pomerance, Sidney Gottlieb, and Jack Sullivan, the volume examines the working relationship between the pair and the contribution that Herrmann’s work brings to Hitchcock’s idiom. Examining key works, including The Man Who Knew Too Much, Psycho, Marnie and Vertigo, the collection explores approaches to sound, music, collaborative authorship and the distinctive contribution that Herrmann’s work with Hitchcock brought to this body of films.

Partners in Suspense examines the significance, meanings, histories and enduring legacies of one of film history’s most important partnerships. By engaging with the collaborative work of Hitchcock and Herrmann, the essays in the collection examine the ways in which film directors and composers collaborate, how this collaboration is experienced in the film text, and the ways such a partnership inspires later work.

Abstract only
Peter J. Martin

implications of these arguments for our understanding of music, since there are significant parallels between the move from ‘meaning’ to ‘use’ in studies of language, and the more recent reorientation evident in sociological studies which have been concerned to investigate ways in which music is used in social situations, rather than to define its meaning in some ultimate, decontextualised sense. As I suggested in Chapter 3, a good deal of work carried out under the auspices of the ‘new’ musicology is disappointing in this respect – indeed, somewhat paradoxically, the ‘new

in Music and the sociological gaze
Peter J. Martin

Chap 2 10/7/06 11:49 am Page 13 2 Music and the sociological gaze Introduction ‘The history of musicology and music theory in our generation’, write Cook and Everist, ‘is one of loss of confidence: we no longer know what we know’ (1999: v). The reasons for this widely acknowledged crisis of confidence need not be rehearsed, but clearly arise from a series of challenges to the established discipline – from, for example, the critical and feminist theories of the ‘new’ musicologists, from various claims about the proper relation of musicology to

in Music and the sociological gaze
Aaron S. Allen

11 Symphonic pastorals redux Aaron S. Allen Ecocriticism began as an endeavour rooted in text. Ecomusicology extends it to the realm of sound. For musicology, the genre or idea of the symphony is laden with prestige; for ecocriticism, the pastoral has similar stature and is a genre or mode central to the discipline. In the concise juxtaposition of these two terms, I illustrate ecomusicology, which connects ecocritical and musicological scholarship, and further outline a brief critical history of selected symphonies in relation to the pastoral. I argue that

in Extending ecocriticism
Art worlds and cultural production
Author: Peter J. Martin

This book explores the interface between musicological and sociological approaches to the analysis of music, and in doing so reveals the differing foundations of cultural studies and sociological perspectives more generally. Building on the arguments of his earlier book Sounds and society, the author initially contrasts text-based attempts to develop a ‘social’ analysis of music with sociological studies of musical activities in real cultural and institutional contexts. It is argued that the difficulties encountered by some of the ‘new’ musicologists in their efforts to introduce a social dimension to their work are often a result of their unfamiliarity with contemporary sociological discourse. Just as linguistic studies have moved from a concern with the meaning of words to a focus on how they are used, a sociological perspective directs our attention towards the ways in which the production and reception of music inevitably involve the collaborative activities of real people in particular times and places. The social meanings and significance of music, therefore, cannot be disclosed by analysis of the ‘texts’ alone, but only through the examination of the ways in which music is a constituent part of real social settings. This theme is developed through discussions of music in relation to processes of social stratification, the collaborative activities of improvising musicians, music as language, music as a ‘cultural object’ and music in everyday social situations.

Abstract only
Laurence Coupe

of artists such as Dylan and the Beatles appears far more substantial than one thought. For, not only did they benefit from the idea that it is possible to use one’s art to help manifest the sacred in the profane, but they also took that idea further than had been possible for the people who influenced them. While I have said from the outset that musicology is not our concern, it has to be acknowledged that the power of popular song to make the spiritual dimension of existence seem immediate, and to make complex religious philosophies accessible, gives songwriters

in Beat sound, Beat vision
Abstract only
Peter J. Martin

musicology, cultural and media studies, history, philosophy, and psychology. At the risk of oversimplifying a complex situation, it may be asserted that the primary focus of this specifically sociological ‘gaze’ is a concern to examine the various ways in which music is used in a whole range of social situations, and the consequences of this. Just as in the study of language, sociologists have with increasing confidence investigated the use of music by real people in real situations, thus moving away from a concern with revealing the meaning of musical texts. This approach

in Music and the sociological gaze
Open Access (free)
In the beginning was song
Mads Qvortrup

’ (I: 872–3). This passion prompted his first published work – Projet concernant de nouveaux signes pour la musique, which he (without much success) sent to the Academie des Sciences in the early 1740s, and his obsession with music was evident in his numerous writings on musicology (Dictionnaire de musique, Lettre sur la musique française and L’Origine de la mélodie) and, of course, in the music he composed. Rousseau studied music at Le Maître in Annecy, and taught himself by reading and annotating contemporary composers. During his stay in Italy he was captivated by

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Peter J. Martin

Chap 3 10/7/06 11:49 am Page 32 3 Over the rainbow? On the quest for ‘the social’ in musical analysis Introduction In the previous chapter it was suggested that many of the challenges to the ‘old’ ways of musicology derive from the assertion that the study of music must recognise the inescapably social nature of the creation, performance and reception of music. While there may indeed be much to be gained in a technical sense by removing the creature – in this case the musical work – from its natural habitat and dissecting it in the laboratory, the essence

in Music and the sociological gaze
Abstract only
Alternative Ulster?
George Legg

Did I Get? Punk, Memory and Autobiography’, in Punk Rock: So What? The Cultural Legacy of Punk ed. by Roger Sabin (London: Routledge, 1999), pp. 227–228.  8 Gerry Smyth, Noisy Island: A Short History of Irish Popular Music (Cork: Cork University Press, 2005), p. 49.  9 See, for example, Sean Campbell, ‘“Pack Up Your Troubles”: Politics and Popular Music in Pre- and Post-­ceasefire Ulster’, Popular Musicology Online, 4 (2007) www. popular-musicology-online.com/issues/04/campbell-01.html [accessed 24 July 2017]. 190 Northern Ireland and the politics of boredom

in Northern Ireland and the politics of boredom