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Ireland as a case study
Author: Gavin Barrett

The role of national parliaments in the European Union (EU) has developed considerably over time. This book focuses on one parliament as a case study in this regard: the national parliament of Ireland, the Oireachtas. The basic structure of that parliament is modelled on that of the United Kingdom. Like the United Kingdom, Ireland joined the then European Communities on 1 January 1973. Within a relatively short period from the date of Ireland's joining the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1973, it became clear that major structural change to the Communities would be needed if the EEC were ever to fulfil its potential. The book examines the initial adaptations of its parliament to European integration and how Ireland's domestic parliamentary accommodation of membership slowly changed over time. It focuses on the considerable impact on domestic parliamentary arrangements of the recent banking and foreign debt crises and of the Treaty of Lisbon. An assessment of the role of the Oireachtas in European law and policy during the lifetimes of the 30th Dail (2007-11) and the 31st Dail (2011-16) follows. The book discusses the formation of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on European Union Affairs, which held its first meeting in private on 19 July 2016, and its first public meeting on 7 September. However, Ireland's position as a "slow adaptor" to European integration has meant that the Oireachtas has had more ground to make up than many other legislatures.

Gavin Barrett

1 1 The development of a role for national parliaments in the European Union Introduction National parliaments: a role in the shadow of the Treaties This chapter seeks to examine the norms which the European Union (EU) has established regarding the role of national parliaments, and how these norms have evolved over time, and then offer some brief reflections on how domestic legal systems within the EU have tailored the role of their national parliaments in EU affairs. National parliaments were present at the birth of the EU. Each of the three original Community

in The evolving role of national parliaments in the European Union
Gavin Barrett

81 2 Why are we augmenting the role of national parliaments in European affairs? Should we continue to do so? What are the arguments concerning giving national parliaments an increased role in EU matters? The empowerment of national parliaments: an idea whose time has come? The idea of augmenting the powers of national parliaments in EU policy matters has momentum. There are several possible reasons, e.g., the gradual expansion of EU activities into a wider and more politicised range of policy fields, and the perception that this would help remedy a supposed

in The evolving role of national parliaments in the European Union
Catalysts for reform of the Oireachtas role in European Union affairs
Gavin Barrett

factors played a role in catalysing the economic crisis within the country, domestic factors  –​institutional, procedural and indeed attitudinal –​also need to be addressed to improve Ireland’s resilience to future shocks.2 Reform pressures generated by the Lisbon Treaty and the economic crisis thus pushed, to some degree, against an open door. 146 146 National parliaments in the European Union The impact of the banking and sovereign debt crises is examined below. The provisions of the Treaty itself and of the Lisbon Treaty and its associated Protocols have been

in The evolving role of national parliaments in the European Union
Reflections on how the role of the Irish parliament in European affairs might be improved
Gavin Barrett

281 6 Looking to the future: reflections on how the role of the Irish parliament in European affairs might be improved Introduction The question of why national parliaments should be acquiring an increased role in EU policy matters was examined in Chapter 2. This chapter focuses on the particular case of the Oireachtas and considers what improvements could be effected in its EU-​related role. Ireland’s EU membership has given rise to many challenges for the Oireachtas.1 It is not unique among parliaments in this.2 However, Ireland’s position as a “slow adaptor

in The evolving role of national parliaments in the European Union
Abstract only
Eliciting a response from the Irish parliament to European integration
Gavin Barrett

Council and European Council arguably most require the imposition of accountability by national parliaments.The European Parliament is answerable 105 A slow adaptor? 105 to voters in direct elections. Commission room for manoeuvre is limited by its need for member state cooperation and, increasingly,2 it also finds itself answering to the European Parliament.3 The European Council and the Council are subject to no comparable collective control. Individual members are subject only to those controls imposed by national political structures. The Oireachtas and the

in The evolving role of national parliaments in the European Union
Abstract only
An overview of the role of the Oireachtas in European Union affairs
Gavin Barrett

, meaning a non-​scholarly forecasting of a future development, has developed considerable momentum. Already in 180 180 National parliaments in the European Union the early 1990s when the Maastricht Treaty was challenged in Germany before the German Constitutional Court, the claimant referred to Delors’ prophecy, turning it into a diagnosis, the description of a present situation. As we can read in the decision by the German Constitutional Court: “The claimant, referring to an assessment made by the President of the European Commission, Delors […], brings forward that

in The evolving role of national parliaments in the European Union
Rosemary Sweet

ROSEMARY SWEET 3 Local identities and a national parliament, c. 1688–18351 Rosemary Sweet The increase in parliamentary activity following the Glorious Revolution of 1688 is one of the most conspicuous features of the eighteenth-century landscape, and a large proportion of the growing volume of legislation arose from local bills. More recently, historians have also been alerted to the significance of failed legislation which reveals even higher levels of business emanating from the localities.2 Legislation of both kinds, national and local, attracted an even

in Parliaments, nations and identities in Britain and Ireland, 1660–1850
Arthur B. Gunlicks

chap 7 27/5/03 11:56 am Page 243 7 The Land parliaments deputies in Germany Introduction When one reads of European parliaments and their members, one normally thinks of the national level. This is understandable with respect to the mostly unitary political systems, which have only national parliaments. But some of these states, such as Germany, Switzerland, Austria, and Belgium, are federal systems, and some others, such as Spain, have a semifederal territorial organization. In these systems far more parliamentarians are members of regional parliaments

in The Länder and German federalism
Open Access (free)
Domestic change through European integration
Otmar Höll, Johannes Pollack and Sonja Puntscher-Riekmann

/12/02 Austria 2:05 pm Page 343 343 his constitutional role – i.e. without specific competences in European politics.22 The parliament In comparison with other national parliaments the Austrian parliament is provided with strong constitutionally embodied participation rights in the field of EU policy.23 Articles 23e and 23f were introduced in a constitutional amendment in December 1994 regulating the rights of information and opinion. Thus, Morass (1996) talks about a ‘special constitutional democratic legitimation’ by the parliament.24 Today this assessment appears to

in Fifteen into one?