The official redefinition of the island of Ireland

How has it been possible for Irish political leaders to not just accept but actively promote two of the largest challenges to Irish nation-statehood: the concession of sovereignty to the European Union (EU) and the retraction of the constitutional claim over Northern Ireland? This book argues that, rather than indicating a pragmatic retreat, such decisions (and their justification on the public stage) reveal the unique power and enduring relevance of nationalism to Irish and European politics today. As a detailed study of official discourse in twentieth-century Ireland, it traces the ways in which nationalism can be simultaneously redefined and revitalised through European integration. The text moves from an overview of the origins and development of Irish official nationalism to analyse the connections between its response to profound internal and external challenges to Irish nation-statehood. The genius of the Irish approach to such challenges has been to employ innovative EU-inspired concepts in finding agreement with and within Northern Ireland, whilst simultaneously legitimising further European integration on the grounds that it fulfils traditional nationalist ideals. Thus, Irish political leaders have been successful in not only accommodating potent nationalist and pro-European discourses, but in making them appear complementary. The book concludes with an assessment of likely changes in this symbiotic relationship in the post-EU enlargement, post-Celtic Tiger era.

M1634 - HAYWARD TEXT.qxp:ANDY Q7 27/1/09 13:23 Page 64 4 The origins of official Irish nationalism The establishment of an independent Irish state was severely complicated by the fact that there was not an Irish nationalism seeking an Irish nation-state as such but rather a range of nationalisms competing for political space and influence in Ireland. The three core versions of nationalism – unionist, constitutional and republican – fostered different conceptions of the meaning and implications of Ireland’s identity, borders and governance and consequently

in Irish nationalism and European integration
Open Access (free)

Nationalism is perhaps the most powerful ideology of the last couple of centuries. We attempt here to distinguish a number of varieties of nationalism – liberal, reactionary and radical. There follows a brief history of nationalism from the pre-Renaissance period to the twentieth century, after which we consider whether nationalism as an ideology serves particular political

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)

. Ongoing salience of nationalisms within diasporas In the Canadian setting, a few studies have highlighted the unique experiences of Caribbean-Canadians, their relation to global geopolitics and racial discourses, and their specific nation-of-origin differences. For example, Jamaicans in Toronto are well known for their ongoing efforts to celebrate 1 August, the day on which their nation of origin

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Between grievance and reconciliation

This book considers Northern Ireland’s constitutional nationalist tradition in the years leading up to the outbreak of the Troubles. Starting in 1932, the year in which the nationalist party the National League of the North walked out of the Northern Ireland parliament, and ending in 1970, when the Nationalist Party was eclipsed by a new generation of civil rights activists, it presents an account of the diverse political parties, organisations, and activists that sought to redress Catholic grievances and pursue the nationalist political goal of Irish unity through constitutional means. The book traces the emergence of anti-partitionism as a major preoccupation of constitutional nationalist groups and parties that existed in the period and critically examines a range of strategies which were intended both to galvanise Catholic support and to move closer to the goal of Irish unity. It assesses the context of these strategies as well as their outcomes and consequences. The fragmentary nature of Northern nationalism, the divisions between its rural Catholic conservative and urban secular labourist elements, and its strategic divide between parliamentary abstentionism and active participation, are all evaluated; so too are the problematic relationships that existed between Northern nationalists and successive Irish governments, and the continued challenges posed by militant Irish republicanism. Finally, this book explores developments in the 1960s when a liberal minority within constitutional nationalism called for a modernised politics and a new relationship between Nationalism and Unionism.

The book explores the politics of the most important Irish nationalist leader of his generation, and one of the most influential figures of twentieth-century Ireland, the Nobel Peace Prize winner John Hume. Given his central role in the reformulation of Irish nationalist ideology, and the vital part he played in drawing violent republicanism into democratic politics, it shows Hume to be one of the chief architects of the Northern Ireland peace process, and a key figure in the making of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. At the same time, the book considers Hume's failure in what he stated to be his foremost political objective: the conciliation of the two communities in Northern Ireland.

4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:26 Page 10 2 Irishness and nationalisms Siniša Malešević Many traditional historical and literary studies of Irish nationalism insist on its unique characteristics. Some focus on the unusual mixture of ethnic and civic ideas that have historically underpinned nationalist narratives and practices in Ireland. Others point out the uncommon tendency for Irish nationalism to incorporate both left and right of the political spectrum. Many emphasise the distinct colonial legacy, the unusual geographic

in Are the Irish different?

the name of the nation, and states have disintegrated into bitterness and conflict as a result. Nationalism can be very exclusive. Much of the thinking described in this chapter prizes a solidarity that is strong yet socially inclusive. In section 1 the issue of solidarity will be explained. Nationalists argue that solidarity derived from ‘thin’ concepts like ‘justice’ and ‘utility’ cannot bind people to

in Political concepts
Sol Plaatje and W.E.B.Du Bois

chapter5 21/12/04 11:16 am Page 89 5 Black Atlantic nationalism: Sol Plaatje and W.E.B. Du Bois The critical era of black Atlanticism began in 1993, with the publication of Paul Gilroy’s seminal book The Black Atlantic.1 The book’s focus on the cultural, political and economic relations of Africa, Europe and the New World was not original. Such a focus has been the concern of African and African diasporic thinkers from at least Equiano onwards.2 Rather, what distinguished Gilroy’s work was its theoretical and political thrust. This was firmly anti

in Postcolonial contraventions
The examples of Algeria and Tunisia

programme on the actions of Egyptian Muslim scholars led by Mohammad Abduh and Rashid Rida. 5 All variants of oppositional Arab nationalism shared a common trait: each identified foreign rule as the principal obstacle to overcome. The intensification of the Arab-Zionist conflict in the Palestine mandate united Muslims more than any other issue. The Palestine Revolt of 1936

in The French empire between the wars