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Hyangjin Lee

Who is responsible for the national division of Korea? This is the central question for contemporary Koreans in defining their identity as a nation. Contemporary Koreans have a strong sense of nationhood since the peninsula had been ruled by a single polity since being unified in 668 by Shilla, one of the three ancient Korean kingdoms. 1 Moreover, the boundaries of this single polity coincided with

in Contemporary Korean cinema
From Nosferatu to Nazism
Patrick Colm Hogan

It has been widely asserted that nationhood is inseparable from narration. This vague claim may be clarified by understanding that nationalism is bound up with the universal prototypical narrative structures of heroic, romantic, and sacrificial tragi-comedy. This essay considers an historically important case of the emplotment of nationalism - the sacrificial organization of German nationalism between the two world wars. It examines one exemplary instance of this emplotment, F. W. Murnau‘s Nosferatu, a Symphony of Horror (1922). However unintentionally, Nosferatu represents the vampire in a way that is cognitively continuous with Nazi representations of Jews. The films sacrificial emplotment of vampirism is, in turn, continuous with Nazi policies. That continuity places the film in a larger discourse that helped to make Nazi policies possible.

Film Studies
Identity, culture and politics
Author:

Film in Korea has always been under governmental censorship. This book examines the ways in which Korean film reveals the ideological orientation of the society in which it is created and circulated. It examines the social and political milieu in which the Korean film industry developed from its beginning during the Japanese colonial period to its bifurcation into South and North Korean cinemas. The book presents a critical analysis of the selected films, which were all made between 1960 and 1990. It discusses the cultural identity of contemporary Koreans by analysing five films based on a popular traditional folk tale, Ch'unhyangjŏn. Three of the five films were made in South Korea: Shin Sangok's Song Ch'unhyang, Pak T'ae-wŏn's The Tale of Song Ch'unhyang and Han Sanghun's SongCh'unhyang. The significance of gender and class issues in Ch'unhyangjŏn can be glimpsed through the three variants of the film title. The book then examines the notion of nationhood held by contemporary Koreans from two interrelated perspectives, political and cultural. It explores the films in relation to the conflicting ideological orientations of North and South Korea. In the North Korean films, anti-imperialism constitutes the core of their definition of nationhood. Class is one of the foremost factors in the formation of cultural identities of contemporary Koreans living as a divided nation. The book discusses six films in this context: The Untrodden Path, The Brigade Commander's Former Superior, Bellflower, A Nice Windy Day, Kuro Arirang and Black Republic.

Editor:

Staging an encounter between cinema and countryside is to invoke a rich and diverse spatial imagery. This book explores the reciprocal relationship between film and the rural: how film makes rural and rural makes film. Part I of the book explores the idea of the nationhood and relatedly, how cinematic countrysides frame the occupancy and experience of border zones. It covers representations of the Australian landscape and the spatial imagery behind the 'inculcation of political ideology' of North Korean films. European 'films of voyage' are a cinematic tradition that articulates representations of the countryside with questions of boundaries and cultural diversity. The 'pagan' landscape of British cinema and the American and British war films are also discussed. Part II focuses on the role that countrysides play in mediating national self-image through globalising systems of cinematic production. Films such as The Local Hero and The Lord of the Rings, the latter in the context of New Zealand as a shooting location, are discussed. The third part of the book focuses on two key markers of social identity and difference - 'childhood' and 'masculinity' - which serve to amplify how embodied identities come to inflect the idea of rural space. A family's relocation to the countryside from the city serves to emphasise that they are isolated from the moral structures that might contain their deviant behaviour. Part IV of the book deals with, inter alia, the Amber Film and Photography Collective, and amateur films on the former coalfields of Durham.

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Hyangjin Lee

This book examines the ways in which Korean film reveals the ideological orientation of the society in which it is created and circulated. To understand the workings of ideology in contemporary Korea as a divided nation, this study takes a comparative approach to the films from both sides, considering gender, nationhood and class. A comparative analysis of the representation of ideology in the

in Contemporary Korean cinema
Robert Fish

cinema itself. The volume is organised around four sections, each emphasising different thematic concerns and approaches to the idea of cinematic countrysides. The first and principal section of this collection entitled Nations, borders and histories explores the idea of the nationhood – how ideas of nation are formed, expressed and questioned through different articulations of cinema and countryside – and relatedly, how

in Cinematic countrysides
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Popular television in authoritarian Europe – a popular conundrum?
Peter Goddard

resistance’ and warns against considering audiences ‘cultural dopes’. So, while popular television may embody a world view that serves the interests of ­socially dominant groups, audiences can also bring their own – at times subversive – understanding to bear in some circumstances. Developing another aspect of popular television’s power relations, the final issue concerns nationhood. One significant benefit of tele­ vision is its ability to reach all citizens at once. So, like radio before it, television became a crucial site for the construction of national identity and

in Popular television in authoritarian Europe
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Jonathan Rayner

images of nationhood produced by the Australian cinema is linked indelibly to enduring colonial, cultural associations. The stereotypes of Australian-ness which emerged in early, successful or favoured cinematic representations have entered the consciousness of local and foreign audiences. Consequently they form as benchmark from which subsequent images can diverge or derive power from contrast or comparison. Even under circumstances of indigenous production, the framework of cinema often remains a First World institution, from

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Basil Glynn

The Tudors (2007–10) is a prime example of a relatively new type of post-national and post-historical television series that has become an established global alternative to BBC costume drama. Drawing on international rather than specifically British ideals of nationhood, it often runs counter to received history 1 while the use of computer-generated imagery (CGI) gives

in The British monarchy on screen
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The costume adventure series
Author:

This book explores the history of swashbuckling television from its origins in the 1950s. It is the first study of one of the most popular and enduring genres in television history, the costume adventure series. Harlech Television's (HTV) Arthur of the Britons and Southern Television's The Black Arrow, which both aired in December 1972, were the first new British costume adventure series since Sir Francis Drake in 1961. The book then maps the major production cycles of the Anglophone swashbuckler both in Britain and in the United States and places the genre in its historical, cultural and institutional contexts. It analyses the cultural politics of the swashbuckler, considering how it has been a vehicle for the representation of ideologies of class, gender and nationhood. The book further shows how the success of The Adventures of Robin Hood in the 1950s established a template for a genre that has been one of the most successful of British television exports. It considers how America responded to the 'British invasion' with its own swashbuckling heroes such as Zorro. Finally, the book focuses on four British swashbucklers of the 1980s, Dick Turpin, Smuggler, Adventurer and Robin of Sherwood, that represent a distinct cycle within the genre.