Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for :

  • "naval manhood" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Representing naval manhood in the British Empire, 1870–1918
Author: Mary A. Conley

The later nineteenth century was a time of regulation and codification, which was part of the Victorian search for reliability and respectability. This book examines the intersection between empire, navy, and manhood in British society from 1870 to 1918. It sheds light upon social and cultural constructions of working-class rather than elite masculinities by focusing on portrayals of non-commissioned naval men, the 'lower deck', rather than naval officers. Through an analysis of sources that include courts-martial cases, sailors' own writings, and the HMS Pinafore, the book charts new depictions of naval manhood during the Age of Empire. It was a period of radical transformation of the navy, intensification of imperial competition, democratisation of British society, and advent of mass culture. The book argues that popular representations of naval men increasingly reflected and informed imperial masculine ideals in Victorian and Edwardian Britain. It explains how imperial challenges, technological changes and domestic pressures transformed the navy and naval service from the wake of the Crimean War to the First World War. How female-run naval philanthropic organisations domesticated the reputation of naval men by refashioning the imagery of the drunken debauched sailor through temperance and evangelical campaigns is explained. The naval temperance movement was not singular in revealing the clear class dimensions in the portrayal of naval manhood. The book unveils how the British Bluejacket as both patriotic defender and dutiful husband and father stood in sharp contrast to the stereotypic image of the brave but bawdy tar of the Georgian navy.

Abstract only
Mary A. Conley

As this book has tried to show, the new depictions of naval manhood that emerged in the late nineteenth century were not a matter of the triumphant supplanting of the libertine Jack Tar for the figure of the respectable dauntless British bluejacket defending home and empire. However, what was remarkable in the late-Victorian and Edwardian period was the proliferation of positive depictions of naval

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
Abstract only
Gender, navy and empire
Mary A. Conley

little in common with the imagined sailors of earlier ballads. His query points to the interconnectedness of empire, naval manhood and British society that is the focus of this book. Its aim is to uncover how naval manhood came to be aligned with imperial manliness by studying the relationship between navy, empire and society from the Victorian period through the years leading up to the First World War

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
Social mobility, heroism and naval manhood
Mary A. Conley

The naval temperance movement was not singular in revealing the clear class dimensions in the portrayal of naval manhood. A significant component in constructing gendered identities in their lived and hegemonic forms, class influenced most distinctly the complexion of gender and manliness in Victorian Britain and empire. 1 Analysing the class implications of representing

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
Philanthropy, Agnes Weston and contested manhood
Mary A. Conley

imagery of naval manhood in publicising its charitable efforts. Her ministrations either castigated naval men for their profligate vices or celebrated them for their domestic virtues. While reforming naval manhood was central to her mission, her consistent allusions to reprobate naval manhood helped to cultivate older stereotypes of the Jolly Jack Tar. As a consequence, her portrayals of naval manhood often

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
Naval scares, imperial anxieties and naval manhood
Mary A. Conley

steadier. Doubtless there were “hard causes” in the navy … but it doesn't do to be dissolute nowadays if a man wants to get on’. 20 As an ex-petty officer and leader of the lower-deck reform movement, Lionel Yexley attested that naval men ‘as a class’were ‘both sober, intelligent, and of a high moral standard’. 21 Naval manhood was not only gauged by professionalism, intellect and morality but by an

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
Abstract only
Michael Brown and Joanne Begiato

routes, and thus ‘naval manhood came to be aligned with imperial manliness’ by the First World War.17 By the end of the nineteenth century, uniformed sailors were ‘a central part of national and imperial pageantry, of state funerals and other occasions, suitably drilled and disciplined for their ceremonial roles’.18 In the last decade, studies of the figure of the Tar have revealed his ambiguities: at any one time depicted as comical, bawdy, sentimental, heroic, pathetic and virile.19 These studies, and others like them, expose the multivalent and complex nature of

in Martial masculinities
Abstract only
Britain and the sea
Jan Rüger

Changes; Wigen, ‘Oceans of History’, 717–21; Rüger, Great Naval Game; David Cannadine (ed.), Empire, the Sea and Global History: Britain’s Maritime World, c. 1763–c. 1840 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007); Linda Colley, The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh; Mary Conley, From Jack Tar to Union Jack: Representing Naval Manhood in the British Empire, 1870–1918 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009). 21 Raphael Samuel, Island Stories: Unravelling Britain (London: Verso, 1997); David Cannadine (ed.), Admiral Lord Nelson: Context and Legacy (London: Palgrave, 2005

in A new naval history
Stuart Ward

intellectuals, ‘naval manhood’, Liverpool, and the culture of imperial decline, all of which take their point of departure in the metropole. 90 As the Series has evolved, so too have the conceptual tools for understanding the nature of the empire’s interconnectedness. Mrinalini Sinha’s idea of an ‘imperial social formation’ in the 1990s, like Zoë Laidlaw’s work on imperial ‘networks’ a decade later, helped to

in Writing imperial histories
Abstract only
Daniel Owen Spence

Colville, ‘Corporate Domesticity and Idealised Masculinity: Royal Naval Officers and their Shipboard Homes, 1918–39’, Gender and History , Vol. 21, No. 3 (November, 2009 ), pp. 499–519. 14 Mary A. Conley, From Jack Tar to Union Jack: Representing naval manhood in the British Empire, 1870

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67