Kélina Gotman

masks and of African philosophy, Souleymane Bachir Diagne in African Art and Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson and the Idea of Negritude suggested a rhythmic manner of reading which aligned itself with a version of Négritude not concerned with essentialism, but with dialogue, ‘co-naissance’, mixture, intermingling. 4 This, I saw, reading

in Foucault’s theatres
Fanon’s response to Sartre
Robert Bernasconi

100 Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks 5 The European knows and does not know: Fanon’s response to Sartre ROBERT BERNASCONI Jean-Paul Sartre’s ‘Orphée noir’, his introduction to Leopold Sédar Senghor’s Anthologie de la nouvelle poésie nègre et malgache de langue française, explicitly raises the question of how Whites should respond to the poems included there (Sartre 1948: ix; Sartre 2001: 115). He concedes that a white man can hardly speak suitably of Negritude (Sartre 1948: xxix; Sartre 2001: 129), and yet he offers to explain to Whites what Blacks

in Frantz Fanon’s 'Black Skin, White Masks
Azzedine Haddour

’s existential phenomenology and his views on negritude. Second, it goes on to engage with Fanon’s critique of Sartre’s pronouncement on negritude as the most revolutionary poetry in the twentieth century. The aim of this chapter is to underscore the significance of Sartre in Fanon’s work, providing a context in which to interpret the latter’s psychoanalysis, universal humanism and political praxis. My task is to establish that his humanism and politics are predicated on Sartreanism. In Black 34 Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference Skin, White Masks, his

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference

Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference raises a host of crucial questions regarding the relevance of Fanon today: in today’s world, where violence and terror have gone global, what conclusions might we draw from Fanon’s work? Should we keep on blaming Fanon for the colonial violence, which he internalized and struggled against, and overlook the fact that the very Manichaeism that previously governed the economy of colonial societies is now generating violence and terror on a global scale? Has the new humanism which he inaugurates in the concluding section of The Wretched of the Earth turned out to be nothing but a vain plea? What grounds for optimism does he allow us, if any? What is to be salvaged from his ethics and politics in this age of globalization?

Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference offers a new reading of Fanon’s work, challenging many of the reconstructions of Fanon in critical and postcolonial theory and in cultural studies and probing a host of crucial issues: the intersectionality of gender and colonial politics; the biopolitics of colonialism; Marxism and decolonization; tradition, translation and humanism. Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference underscores the ethical dimension of Fanon’s work by focusing on his project of decolonization and humanism.

John McLeod

this chapter: the first is Negritude, while the second emerges from Frantz Fanon’s work on national consciousness and national culture. Negritude Although not strictly a national formation, Negritude is useful to explore at this juncture as it was a particularly powerful mode of dissidence used to forge ‘deep, horizontal comradeship’ between colonised peoples. We might say that it was national ist in its design, if not distinctly national in its reach. And it importantly influenced the development of thinking about nationalism and nationalist consciousness which

in Beginning postcolonialism (second edition)
Azzedine Haddour

. Fanon: against the racialization of culture In The Wretched of the Earth, Fanon establishes a parallel between men of culture who championed negritude and those who idealized the Arabo-Islamic past. Elaborating on the psycho-affective complexes 206 Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference engendered in ‘men of culture’ – the advocates of negritude and AraboIslamism – who turned to a mythic past to counter colonialism, he writes: The example of the Arab world might equally well be quoted here. We know that the majority of Arab territories have been under

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference

This edited collection is the first to engage directly with Foucault’s thought on theatre and with the theatricality of his thought. Michel Foucault was not only one of the most controversial and provocative thinkers of the twentieth century, he was also one of its most inventive and penetrating researchers. Notoriously hard to pin down, his work evades easy categorisation – philosopher, historian of ‘systems of thought’, ‘radical journalist’ ‒ Foucault was all of these things, and so much more. In what some see as a post-critical landscape, the book forcefully argues for the urgency and currency of Foucauldian critique, a method that lends itself to theatrical ways of thinking: how do we understand the scenes and dramaturgies of knowledge and truth? How can theatre help understand the critical shifts that characterised Foucault’s preoccupation with the gaze and the scenographies of power? Above all, what makes Foucault’s work compelling comes down to the question he repeatedly asked: ‘What are we at the present time?’ The book offers a range of provocative essays that think about this question in two ways: first, in terms of Foucault’s self-fashioning – the way he plays the role of public intellectual through journalism and his many public interviews, the dramaturgy of his thinking, and the appeal to theatrical tropes in his work; and, second, to think about theatre and performance scholarship through Foucault’s critical approaches to truth, power, knowledge, history, governmentality, economy, and space, among others, as these continue to shape contemporary political, ethical, and aesthetic concerns.

Abstract only
Azzedine Haddour

centre of Memmi’s critique is Fanon’s rejection of both French culture and negritude, and his espousal of revolutionary praxis in colonial Algeria and Africa. ‘In his short life,’ Memmi writes, ‘Frantz Fanon experienced at least three serious failures.’2 The first consists in his disavowal of his West Indian identity and in his identification with the colonizer’s cultural models, which were French and white. The second was the outcome of his disillusionment with these models; his encounter with racism in mainland France ultimately led him to renounce his Frenchness

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference
Abstract only
A black rebel with a cause
Azzedine Haddour

sailors, they sought avenues of flight to ‘escape from [their] colour’.15 Césaire’s claim to authenticity, his affirmation of negritude as a poetics of deliverance for the oppressed Negroes, was a scandal in a society which had thus far identified with white Europeans. Chapter 1 and Chapter 3 explore this ambivalence vis-à-vis negritude. During the occupation, Martinique was in a state of political paralysis; only La Voix de la France libre (The Voice of Free France) broadcasting from London brought some fervour to the political life of the island. The wireless played a

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual
Helen Carr

identified with women. Anglo-Saxon men, Rhys complains, despise women writers. In her version of the Caribbean, women are always singing songs, telling stories. Ramchand famously called Voyage in the Dark ‘our first negritude novel’, and certainly there is much in common with négritude ’s celebration of black warmth and creativity. 77 Rhys deeply admired many European writers. Yet she does

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain