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Global processes, local challenges

This book is a tribute to Enzo Mingione and his contribution to the fields of sociology and urban studies on the occasion of his retirement. It touches upon the processes of transformation of cities to the informal economy, from the Fordist crisis to the rediscovery of poverty, from the welfare state and welfare policies to migration and the transformation of work. These themes constitute the analytical building blocks of this book on the transitions that Western capitalist societies are undergoing. The book focuses on social foundations of Western capitalism, explaining how socio-economic and institutional complementarities that characterised postwar capitalism created relatively integrated socio-economic regimes, It has five thematic sections reflecting five areas of capitalism, the search interests of Enzo Mingione. The first discusses the transformations of global capitalism, addressing how capitalism works and how it changes. The second provides insights into the mechanisms of re-embedding, in particular how welfare policies are part of a societal reaction to capitalism's disruptive dynamic. The third addresses some main challenges that citizenship systems established in the post-war period have had to face, from the spread of new employment regimes to new migratory flows. The fourth addresses cities and their transformation and the final section addresses poverty and its spatial dimension as a crucial lens through which to understand the differentiated impact of the processes of change in Western capitalist societies, both in socio-economic and spatial terms.

Robert Chernomas
,
Ian Hudson
, and
Mark Hudson

. The rest of the book Neoliberal capitalism is a class-based political project undertaken to more favorably position business in its struggle to enhance the conditions for profitability—a project that reaches deeply into the weave of social and ecological life. It involves both the increasing role of money and markets in the determination of life chances and the systematic push of corporations—as bearers of neoliberal reason and as beneficiaries of neoliberal transformations—into previously protected spheres of life. Each of the chapters

in Neoliberal lives
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Work, politics, nature, and health in the contemporary United States

Life in America has been transformed over the past thirty-five years. Using a historical materialist framework, the authors argue that what appear today as fragmented social, economic, environmental, and political problems are all manifestations of neoliberalism – a class-based political project to position capital more favourably in its struggle to preserve the conditions for accumulation. This project reaches deeply into the weave of biological, ecological, and social life. It involves both the increasing role of money and markets in the determination of life chances, and the systematic push of corporations into previously protected spheres of life.

Emphasizing Martha Nussbaum’s question “What does a life worthy of human dignity require?”, each chapter of this book (covering work, the environment, health, education, and politics) analyses a cornerstone of human development that had previously been, to varying degrees, protected from the logic of the capitalist market. This book examines how US business successfully increased control over, privatized, or commodified each of these areas, amounting to a neoliberal transformation of lived experience. Neoliberalism has far-reaching and troubling consequences for the potential of people in the US to live a full and flourishing life. The final chapter provides an evaluation of the claim that the election of Donald Trump to the US presidency represents a rupture in neoliberal politics.

Given the significant similarities and differences between the welfare states of Northern Europe and their reactions to the perceived 'refugee crisis' of 2015, the book focuses primarily on the three main cases of Denmark, Sweden and Germany. Placed in a wider Northern European context – and illustrated by those chapters that also discuss refugee experiences in Norway and the UK – the Danish, Swedish and German cases are the largest case studies of this edited volume. Thus, the book contributes to debates on the governance of non-citizens and the meaning of displacement, mobility and seeking asylum by providing interdisciplinary analyses of a largely overlooked region of the world, with two specific aims. First, we scrutinize the construction of the 2015 crisis as a response to the large influx of refugees, paying particular attention to the disciplinary discourses and bureaucratic structures that are associated with it. Second, we investigate refugees’ encounters with these bureaucratic structures and consider how these encounters shape hopes for building a new life after displacement. This allows us to show that the mobility of specific segments of the world’s population continues to be seen as a threat and a risk that has to be governed and controlled. Focusing on the Northern European context, our volume interrogates emerging policies and discourses as well as the lived experiences of bureaucratization from the perspective of individuals who find themselves the very objects of bureaucracies.

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Brian Elliott

wealth and yet never seemed to miss or desire them. For my part, the seemingly endless offering of biscuits and cakes, punctuated by plentiful cups of tea, was already unimagined riches to my seven-year-old self. This personal experience informs a crucial further claim advanced in this book: the working class is injured just as much, if not more so, by lack of political recognition as by economic deprivation. This is a central plank of the neoliberal transformation: that working-class practices of solidarity are dissolved within the social ideology of individualized

in The roots of populism
Sam King

Politics , p. 130. 4 R. Barrigos , ‘ The Neoliberal Transformation of Higher Education ’, Marxist Left Review , 6 ( 2013 ), 80 . 5

in Imperialism and the development myth
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Future paths under the crisis of neoliberalism, the changing global order and revolts from below
Kayhan Valadbaygi

study that called for the interrelated conceptualisation of the production and reproduction processes, class modality, state formation and geopolitics. The perspective allowed us to trace the neoliberal transformation of the country since the early 1990s, but rather than focusing merely on the documentation of neoliberal policies, it advanced a scrutiny of the ways in which the process has underpinned the patterns

in Capitalism in contemporary Iran
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Chris Armstrong

, sexism, and the neoliberal transformation of society, for instance, then these theories have made far less impressive contributions. The second set of concerns were more ‘political’ in the conventional sense, insofar as they addressed, amongst other things, the way in which liberal (and especially luck) egalitarians have positioned themselves in relation to their ideological opponents. Following the halcyon days of social welfarism, a New Right (or more broadly, neoliberal) onslaught has succeeded to a large extent in redefining the terms of citizenship and the

in Rethinking Equality
Neoliberalism’s “nature”
Robert Chernomas
,
Ian Hudson
, and
Mark Hudson

facilitate the transfer of wealth and power to the already-wealthy and powerful, asks us to see, comprehend, and treat nature as a matrix of commodified or commodifiable values, each infinitely divisible and exchangeable for every other. Neoliberalism's transformation of the ways society and nature organize and constitute one another can be seen most clearly through changing patterns of property relations and rights, including new forms of state-mediated access to nature's “sources” and “sinks,” the emergence of new, environmentally related

in Neoliberal lives
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Why water, why now?
Madelaine Moore

facilitated through new technology that allowed for large-scale hydroelectricity and dam construction, teamed with a rapid urbanisation that followed industrialisation and necessitated improved urban sanitation systems (Loftus et al., 2019 , pp. 3–4). The delivery of water as a public service and mastery of nature through dams and irrigation systems were forms of state-building exercises that reflected dominant socio/nature production relations (see Swyngedouw and Boelens, 2018 ). However, as part of the neoliberal transformation

in Water struggles as resistance to neoliberal capitalism