The genesis of Israeli policies of population management, surveillance and political control towards the Palestinian minority

Widely regarded as expert in techniques of surveillance and political control, Israel has been successful in controlling a native population for a long time. Despite tremendous challenges, it has maintained a tight grip over a large Palestinian population in the territories it occupied in the 1967 war. Moreover, it has effectively contained the Palestinian minority inside its 1948 borders. This book discusses the foundation of an Israeli discourse about the Palestinian minority, which Israeli leaders called birour or clarification, and the circumstances of its emergence and crystallization. It talks about the policy of constructing the Palestinians both as non-Jews and as an assortment of insular minorities. The fate of this minority was not only an Israeli internal affair but also an issue of concern to the international community. An analysis of the legal and institutional frameworks, and the role of state power in categorizing the Palestinians, follows. The book also analyses the ways state control and surveillance were implemented at the level of the locality. The book highlights the way state educational policy not just fostered the segmentation described earlier but promoted among students and educators. It then takes up the question of political rights and their meaning under the rule of Military Government. It concludes with personal reflections on the thousands of minutes, protocols, reports, plans and personal messages.

Benjamin J. Elton

discern Hermann Adler’s attitudes to the essential issues of Jewish belief, notably the Torah, Written and Oral, and the authority of Jewish Law (halakhah). We will also look at issues which were of great importance to Hermann Adler as a leader of emancipated Jewry in western Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century: the relationship between Jews and non-Jews and religions other than Judaism, the role of secular learning and modern methods in Jewish learning, and Zionism. Adler was a member of the first generation of rabbis to consider some of these

in Britain’s Chief Rabbis and the religious character of Anglo-Jewry, 1880–1970
Abstract only
Ahmad H. Sa’di

doubt on the naturalness of the official order in which the Palestinians are presented as a mosaic of insular minorities. The aim of this chapter is to deconstruct this order and unveil the role that state power has played, through deliberate planning and direct action, in engineering a social order where ‘ethnic’ categories have been presented as the central or the only form of identification for Palestinians. This constructed order is premised on two representations of the Palestinians: as non-Jews and as a collection of minorities. This balkanized group structure

in Thorough surveillance
Benjamin J. Elton

Chapter 7 The theology of J.H. Hertz .H. HERTZ’S THEOLOGY placed him in the traditional group within the acknowledgement school, although he was influenced by its scientific, romantic and aesthetic branches. We can see this in Hertz’s attitude to the major issues of Jewish belief: the Pentateuch and the rest of the Hebrew Bible, the Oral Law, the development of halakhah, his philosophy of mitsvot, Jewish mysticism, the Messiah and the afterlife. We examine Hertz’s position on secular learning, non-Jews and nonJewish religious movements, and on Jews and Jewish

in Britain’s Chief Rabbis and the religious character of Anglo-Jewry, 1880–1970
Abstract only
Ahmad H. Sa’di

: the panopticon and the state of exception. That the two models were operative is revealed by the metaphors and arguments which appeared in the writings of witnesses, commentators and scholars who have dealt with the period. 01_Ahmad_Introduction.indd 8 8/19/2013 2:26:39 PM MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/19/2013, SPi introduction 9 Chapters 4, 5 and 6 examine specific aspects of the state’s policy of control and surveillance of the Palestinians. In chapter 4, I discuss the policy of constructing the Palestinians both as non-Jews and as an assortment of insular

in Thorough surveillance
Simha Goldin

The Jew who remained a Jew was obliged to define his attitude towards the Jew who converted to Christianity, and indeed this had to be done in many spheres. The halakhah had laid down in principle the decision that a Jew who converted to Christianity was still, despite everything, a brother and a Jew, but this decision was eroded over time. The Rabbinic authorities were being asked Halakhic questions such as: is a convert regarded as a dead person or not? What happens in the case of the wife of a convert who remains Jewish? Can a convert bequeath or inherit possessions? Is the wine he produces “the wine of non-Jews” (that Jews were forbidden to drink)? What is the law applying to those who converted to Christianity and later returned to Judaism? Can they be trusted? Do they have to undergo immersion, like converts to Judaism?

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
Abstract only
Ulrike Ehret

relationship of Jews to the state. Emancipation in Germany was never finished and always remained conditional on the benevolence of non-Jews to grant equality. It has been argued that Jewish emancipation in Britain 01-ChurchNationRace_001-035 12 28/11/11 14:32 Page 12 Church, nation and race focused on the bare details of its implementation (a process that ended within a few years) whereas emancipation in Germany took about 100 years, always inviting a new debate on the ‘Jewish question’.26 The role of the nation state is important in any history of antisemitism. It

in Church, nation and race
Julie Thorpe

group in Austria by demanding the legal separation of Jews and non-Jews in government services, such as education and welfare support, and the total exclusion of Jews from law, medicine and teaching. In addition to these demands, its leaders called for a moratorium on Jewish immigration to Austria, the deportation of all Jewish arrivals since 1914, the official label of ‘Jewish’ for any business or newspaper that employed Jews, a pro rata restriction on Jews in the arts, disenfranchisement of the Jews and, finally, a prohibition on ownership of land or holding public

in Pan-Germanism and the Austrofascist state, 1933–38
Jewish identity in late Victorian Leeds
James Appell

in 1885 who deserted their masters’ workshops could be the very same people who three years later were on the other end of a walkout. It is important to look at the entire system of subdivisional garment production, rather than focusing simply on the relationship between Jewish workshop hands and masters, to identify the source of industrial strife. 36 Another lesson to take from Leeds Jewish trade unionism is the way in which Jews and non-Jews began to come together in the period. The Jewish strikers of 1888 were aided by local non

in Leeds and its Jewish Community
Abstract only
Mobility and anti-Semitism in the interwar period
Amanda Bergen

that by the 1930s ‘the traditional division of the industry between Jews and non-Jews had been considerably modified … The segregation between the two races, both in the factory and in the workshop was lessened.’ 10 This breaking down of barriers served as an important aid to integration. Burton’s provided a protected working environment where the observant were able to practise their religion, and a sense of community developed with workers singing, eating, taking trips to the seaside, attending meetings of the League of Nations and engaging in sporting activities

in Leeds and its Jewish Community