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An Introductory Survey
Richard Sharp

Architecture and visual arts in general have been subjects of a growing body of recent scholarship connected with the ecclesiastical history of the ‘Long Eighteenth Century’, but little attention has been given to portraiture. Although honourable mention should be made of pioneering work by John Ingamells on painted episcopal portraits, and by Peter Forsaith, very recently, on Methodist portrait prints, other aspects of this extensive subject still await investigation. The article outlines the development of engraved portrayal of clergy, mainly of the Church of England, during the two centuries before production of multiple images was taken over by photography, and indicates how the quantity, variety, and dissemination of such material can provide some index of the priorities of a pre-photographic age. It does not aim to be a comprehensive or a complete survey of the corpus of engraved portraiture; nevertheless, this article provides an initial guide to the abundance of previously unexplored illustrative material, and may suggest a framework for further exploration. It is hoped that future scholars will build on this initial work to enable a complete catalogue of such images to be developed and further explored.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
Daniel Szechi

turnout in both the ’15 and ’45 and the enthusiastically Jacobite popular culture of the plebeian Irish Catholics. 27 Thus as late as the 1770s, when almost everyone else had effectively deserted the exiled Stuarts and the papacy had resumed full authority over the church in the three kingdoms and was discreetly selecting non-Jacobite bishops, many Catholics (still including a handful of gentry and clergymen) persisted in clinging to the dynasty. 28 The Nonjurors were originally based on a group of about 400 Anglican clergy who refused to take new oaths of

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Abstract only
The Church of England and the royal supremacy
Jacqueline Rose

jurors and nonjurors within months of the overthrow of a monarch who could be accused of manipulating Erastianism on behalf of papistry. However, the Restoration church moved towards emphasising its universal catholicity more than its national, territorial, status. This was far from being Romish, but it meant that being too Erastian was now a bigger problem than it had been before. This is symbolised by Stillingfleet

in The later Stuart Church, 1660–1714
Benjamin Hoadly and the Eucharist
Robert G. Ingram

context of the previous century’s religio-political ‘troubles’. He had set out these views in his controversial sermon on The Nature of the Kingdom, or Church, of Christ (1717), the piece which sparked the Bangorian controversy. Taking John 18:36 as its starting point, that sermon 83 Daniel Waterland at the royal court fleshed out the logic of his Preservative against the Principles and Practices of Nonjurors (1716), a work which itself had also drawn the ire not just of high churchmen but of many other less altitudinarian clergy besides.8 The posthumous publication

in Reformation without end
Politics and theology, 1701–09P
Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth

advise him that Toland’s claims of service to the minister were a frequent topic of discussion in political circles. Netterville related a meeting he had had with a nonjuror, who ‘asked me if I had an interest in serving Toland’ and described Toland as ‘Harley’s champion’. Later that month, Harley admitted to Lord Raby, English Ambassador in Berlin, that he had indeed employed Toland on various occasions.37 Toland’s acquaintances also attempted to repair his damaged reputation. One Elisha Smith wrote to Thomas Hearne, antiquarian, nonjuror, and at this time Assistant

in Deism in Enlightenment England
Revolution and party
Andrew Mansfield

reflects contemporaneous reaction to the ­Revolution. Much of the wider population accepted the monarchical alteration and quickly acclimatised to James II’s removal.70 However, two important groups did not assent to the revolutionary settlement, believing that the Convention did not possess the right or authority to crown the new monarchs in place of James II. The first of these groups was the Nonjurors: those who would ‘not swear’ the oath of allegiance to the new monarchs. This relatively small number of nine English bishops, over 400 Anglican clergy, a much larger

in Ideas of monarchical reform
Politics and theology, 1709–19
Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth

statements regarding the supposed authority of the church over the faith held by individuals in England and their consciences. FRANCIS ATTERBURY AND THE NONJUROR RESPONSE TO COLLINS Following the release of these two works by Collins there was an orchestrated nonjuror and High Church response.22 The architect of the challenge was Francis Atterbury, who dedicated many hours to a reply. Also involved were a circle of nonjurors associated with Sir Thomas Thynne, first Viscount of Weymouth. Though the work was never published, the events surrounding it remain important because

in Deism in Enlightenment England
The clergy of the later Stuart Church
Grant Tapsel

than four hundred clerics, including some of the most dynamic bishops of the previous decade, could not reconcile taking oaths of loyalty to William and Mary with their pre-existing oaths to James and became ‘non-jurors’, losing their livings as a result. 89 Such clerics were especially antagonised by the rise to favour of those eager to trumpet the providential and positive aspects of William

in The later Stuart Church, 1660–1714
Fear and corruption
Andrew Mansfield

-scale rebellion on British soil did have ‘an impact on British society’, although much of this impact ‘was almost uniformly negative’.3 Jacobitism often provided a focal point for opposition, not only to the revolutionary settlement but to subsequent governments and also the Hanoverian regime. This was one of its two strengths, the other being its relationship with the French. Following the 1688 Revolution, hostility to James II’s removal from power created two ideologically committed groups: the Jacobites and the Nonjurors. While they were not necessarily Jacobites, Nonjuror

in Ideas of monarchical reform
Robert G. Ingram

archbishops and bishops to Oxbridge fellows to notable antiquarians such as John Walker (1674–1747) and John Strype (1643–1737).29 Baker garnered near universal admiration not just because of his unquestioned erudition but also because he was someone whose irenic temperament and unassuming personality won him lasting friendships and whose lack of bitterness was notable among nonjurors of the day.30 He seemed also to have recognized that his friend Grey’s politics were not irenic, noting to one Dissenting historian that Grey was ‘a man of high Principles’, while nevertheless

in Reformation without end