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Mental nurses and their patients, 1935–74
Author: Tommy Dickinson

Anecdotal evidence of the testimonies of patients who received treatments for sexual deviations and medical attitudes towards them are scattered in the recorded accounts of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, intersex and queer/questioning (GLBTIQ) people. This book examines the plight of men who were institutionalised in British mental hospitals to receive 'treatment' for homosexuality and transvestism, and the perceptions and actions of the men and women who nursed them. It explores why the majority of the nurses followed orders in administering the treatment - in spite of the zero success-rate in 'straightening out' queer men - but also why a small number surreptitiously defied their superiors by engaging in fascinating subversive behaviours. The book is specifically about the treatments developed for sexual deviations in the UK. Transvestism was also treated fairly widely; however, not to the same extent as homosexuality. After an examination of the oppression and suppression of the sexual deviant, the introduction of aversion therapies for sexual deviance is considered. During the 1930s-1950s, mental health care witnessed a spirit of 'therapeutic optimism' as new somatic treatments and therapies were introduced in mental hospitals. The book also examines the impact these had on the role of mental nurses and explores how such treatments may have essentially normalised nurses to implement painful and distressing 'therapeutic' interventions . The book interprets the testimonies of these 'subversive nurses'. Finally, it explores the inception of 'nurse therapists' and discusses their role in administering aversion therapy.

Tommy Dickinson

deviation as inappropriate as ideas of deviance shifted. In parallel to this fresh gay visibility and radicalism, the nursing profession was also undergoing changes. The advent of ‘nurse therapists’ witnessed nurses being trained in advanced clinical practice roles, enabling them to be more autonomous practitioners. This period also marked the era of public inquiries into the care of the mentally ill, and the plight of these individuals was moved up the political agenda. This chapter also examines the implications of these changes. Reform, 1957–1967 Jivani argues that the

in ‘Curing queers’
Abstract only
Tommy Dickinson

‘homosexuality’ from its DSM. Chapter 5 considers these issues and also explores the inception of ‘nurse therapists’ and discusses their role in administering aversion therapy. This chapter deliberates the implications of these changes and examines how nurses began to view medical treatments for sexual deviation as inappropriate as ideas of deviance shifted. ‘Curing Queers’ draws to a close by offering some concluding remarks regarding the research upon which it is based. Ideas are drawn together in order to cast light on the possible meanings that nurses attached to the

in ‘Curing queers’
Abstract only
Tommy Dickinson

inception of nurse therapists. In contrast to the nurses who cared for patients receiving treatments for sexual deviations in the earlier part of the study, the nurse therapists appeared to have a theoretical basis upon which to base their clinical practice. However, the testimony of a former patient who was treated by a nurse therapist indicated that this particular nurse was equally as antipathetic as the doctors. Moreover, in spite of the emphasis among nurse therapists believing they had a scientific 236 Concluding remarks foundation for their work, they were still

in ‘Curing queers’
Tommy Dickinson

, intoxicated trainees were then encouraged by FANYs to reveal personal details about themselves: if they did, they would be removed from the course as they were considered a ‘security risk’.30 Nolan argues that such therapeutic practices as ‘habit training’ and ‘social rehabilitation programmes’ (which the prescribed date between Elizabeth Granger and Percival Thatcher can be categorised as) were widespread in the 1960s.31 Indeed, nurse therapist Peter Lindley stated that he taught the homosexual patient he was treating ‘heterosexual social skills’, which included ‘advice

in ‘Curing queers’
Beholding young people’s experiences and expressions of care through oral history performance
Kathleen Gallagher and Rachel Turner-King

educational arena when professionals are being trained as social workers, nurses, therapists, teachers, psychologists, social care workers and/or counsellors/therapists’ (Lynch et al . 2007 : 4). Traditional education’s more pernicious neoliberal agenda, they argue further, concerns producing the resilient, self-sufficient or entrepreneurial citizen, capable of human capital acquisition. This ‘care-less’ model is focused instead on the privatised citizen, educated primarily for themselves; and education itself, a market service to be delivered. Intimate care work is, from

in Performing care