Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • "older people’s interest organisations" x
Clear All
Directors and members
Martha Doyle

5 Older people’s interest organisations: directors and members As outlined in Chapter 1, there is a tendency in the academic literature to examine the politics of old age and the work of older people’s interest organisations at the macro level. Attention is usually given to the issue of influence in the context of specific policy initiatives rather than extending the analysis to explore the broader panoply of work in which they engage and the internal dimensions of the organisations’ operations. This chapter seeks to address this deficiency by exploring the

in The politics of old age
Martha Doyle

3 Older people’s interest organisations Representation at the beginning of the twentieth century The precursors to contemporary older people’s interest organisations in Europe and the United States in the late nineteenth century were in many cases established by war veterans who lobbied for pensions or subsidised salaries (Skocpol, 1992). For example, in Germany by 1921 there were six such organisations, with a membership of 1.3 million. The largest of these organisations, the Reichsbund der Kriegsopfer, Behinderten, Sozialrentner und Hinterbliebenen (League of

in The politics of old age
Older people’s interest organisations and collective action in Ireland
Author: Martha Doyle

The politics of old age in the twenty-first century is contentious, encompassing ideological debates about how old age is conceptualised and the rights and welfare entitlements of individuals in later life. Synthesising key theoretical writings in political science, social/critical gerontology and cultural sociology, the book provides an insight into the complexity of older people’s identity politics, its relationship with age-based social policy and how the power of older people’s interest organisations, their legitimacy and existence remain highly contingent on government policy design, political opportunity structures and the prevailing cultural and socio-economic milieu. The book situates the discussion in the international context and outlines findings of an Irish case study which explores the evolution of older people’s interest organisation in Ireland from their inception in the mid-1990s to the end of the first decade of the twenty-first century. The book is essential reading for policymakers and organisations interested in ageing, policy and the political process and for students of ageing, social policy and political sociology.

Martha Doyle

ideological debate also centres on the notion of representation. The focus of this chapter is policy actors’ interpretations and constructions of older people’s interest organisations and the relationship these constructions have with organisations’ involvement in age-based social policy development. It reflects the analysis of semistructured qualitative interviews with twenty civil/public servants working in the area of old age policy and five former Junior Ministers of State for Older People. The construction of older people’s interest organisations Policy

in The politics of old age
Abstract only
Martha Doyle

). Older people’s interest organisations alone will not be able to bring about change to these practices. However, as part of a ‘discourse community’ (Foucault, 1972) they can play a central role in vocalising the needs and rights of those in residential care and enable them to articulate their ‘collective identity’. Defining their constituency In addition to continuing the fight for the alleviation of institutional and cultural ageism, a legacy of the twentieth century, older people’s interest organisations are likely to confront complex new challenges in the twenty

in The politics of old age
Abstract only
Contextualising the ‘politics of old age’
Martha Doyle

protests resulted in significant changes to the means-test limit but did not result in a complete reversal of the decision. The automatic entitlement to a medical card for all persons aged 70 and over ended on 31 December 2008. Under the Health Act 2008, everyone aged over 70 who applies for a medical card is subject to a means-test. People with a weekly gross income above €700 for a single person or €1,400 for a couple would no longer be entitled to a medical card. During the ‘medical card protests’ the actions of older people’s interest organisations and their members

in The politics of old age
Martha Doyle

documents. In turn initiatives have been funded by the government and run in conjunction with a number of older people’s interest organisations (Age and Opportunity and Age Action Ireland) to advance a more positive portrayal of older people and recognise their needs beyond the narrow ambit of care needs. Pierce (2008), however, argues that the theme of an ageing ‘crisis’ has been discernible in policy documents since the 1990s. She provides the example of the Years Ahead report (Department of Health, 1988) and a 1993 report by the National Pensions Board where the issues

in The politics of old age
Martha Doyle

2 Collective action and the nexus of political and cultural systems Much of the extant research on older people’s interest organisations remains uninformed by the available body of political science and sociological literature. As a result it does not provide an adequate conceptual basis for understanding the complexity of older people’s interest organisations. It fails to offer an in-depth exploration of the contextual factors which impact upon the development, growth and survival of these groups or the discourses informing the topic of collective action of

in The politics of old age
Martha Doyle

7 The nexus of resources, political opportunity structures and collective identities This penultimate chapter considers the implications of the findings discussed in Chapters 5 and 6 for our understanding of older people’s interest organisations and the collective action of older people. It relates these findings to the literature and topics addressed in Chapters 1 to 4. Adopting Tarrow’s (2011) suggestion to synthesise the examination of the subject of collective action, it explores the interaction of political opportunity structures, organisational resources

in The politics of old age
A governmental analysis
Ciara O’Dwyer

-release/minister-announces-fair-deal-on-long-term-nursing-home-care/. Long-term care policy in Ireland 245 Doyle, M. (2014) The Politics of Old Age: Older People’s Interest Organisations and Collective Action in Ireland. Manchester, Manchester University Press. EPS Consulting (2013) The Business Case for the Outsourcing of Home Care Provision and a More Efficient Use of Fair Deal Funds. Dublin, Home and Community Care Ireland. European Commission (2014) Adequate Social Protection for Long-term Care Needs in an Ageing Society. Brussels, European Commission. Fairclough, N. (2000) New Labour, New Language? London, Routledge. Fine Gael

in Reframing health and health policy in Ireland