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Anna Green
and
Kathleen Troup

Oral history is often referred to as a methodology, not a theory. But since the 1980s oral historians have developed a number of interpretive approaches, drawing upon contemporary theories and concepts from a broad range of cognate subjects. These theories and concepts have coalesced into a widely shared understanding that remembering contains both objective and subjective evidence about the past, and that the analysis of oral history interviews requires a multifaceted approach. In this chapter we will briefly outline current understandings about the nature of

in The houses of history
Katherine J. Lewis

it existed in oral form. The confessor's reaction is unpromising, but subsequently Margery finds other clerics willing to listen to her. Having originally been silenced, the Book tells us that she had many opportunities to articulate her life-story, culminating in the narrations which were written down to form the Book . The Book can thus be identified as a form of oral history, and this chapter treats it as such, applying current methodologies of oral history to an analysis of its internal operations. This approach may seem incongruous, given that, ordinarily

in Encountering The Book of Margery Kempe
Jesse Adams Stein

3 Spatial and architectural memory in oral histories of working life Introduction What happens if we invert the cliche ‘if walls could talk?’ and explore what former factory workers might say about those walls? At first this may sound absurd, but in a broad sense this chapter demonstrates this very approach, for it is here that we turn our attention to the richness of content contained within workers’ memories of the buildings in which they worked. While the disciplines of oral history, design history and architectural history are all beginning to engage with

in Hot metal
Noah Millstone

bishop’s tongue gave Hacket a way to claim priority over his competitors, none of whom – not even Heylyn – had enjoyed such intimacy with a powerful person, let alone one famous for unguarded speech. The result was an erudite, textual, but also ineluctably oral history. A final form of spoken discourse haunts Scrinia Reserata . In the prefatory Life he composed for Hacket’s published sermons, Thomas Plume noted that Hacket also loved ‘discourse’, and was himself full of ‘witty apophthegms and other

in Political and religious practice in the early modern British world
Memories of childrens cinema-going in London before the First World War
Luke McKernan

Before 1906, there were no dedicated venues for the exhibition of film in London. Five years later, cinemas had spread all over the city, and 200,000 people were attending a film show in the city every day. Many in these first cinema audiences were children. Significantly - indeed probably uniquely for the time - cinema was a mass entertainment deliberated aimed at, and priced within the range of, the young. Decades later, some of these children left memoirs (published or unpublished), or were interviewed by oral historians. This body of evidence on the experience of cinema-going before the First World War has been hitherto ignored by film historians. This essay examines this testimony from London audience members, which is constructed around the various stages of the act of going to the cinema. The testimony demonstrates that the experience and the enjoyment of the social space that the cinema provided were at least as important as the entertainment projected on the screen. The early cinema demands greater recognition for its function as a social sphere, and particularly as a welcoming place for children.

Film Studies
Author:

This book draws on original research into women’s workplace protest to deliver a new account of working-class women’s political identity and participation in post-war England. In doing so, the book contributes a fresh understanding of the relationship between feminism, workplace activism and trade unionism during the years 1968–85. The study covers a period that has been identified with the ‘zenith’ of trade union militancy. The women’s liberation movement (WLM) also emerged in this period, which produced a shift in public debates about gender roles and relations in the home and the workplace. Industrial disputes involving working-class women have been commonly understood as evidence of women’s growing participation in the labour movement, and as evidence of the influence of second-wave feminism on working-class women’s political consciousness. However, the voices and experiences of female workers who engaged in workplace protest remain largely unexplored. The book addresses this space through detailed analysis of four industrial disputes that were instigated by working-class women. It shows that labour force participation was often experienced or viewed as a claim to political citizenship in late modern England. A combination of oral history and written sources is used to illuminate how everyday experiences of gender and class antagonism shaped working-class women’s political identity and participation.

Colonialism, grave robbery and intellectual history
Larissa Förster
,
Dag Henrichsen
,
Holger Stoecker
, and
Hans Axasi╪Eichab

In 1885, the Berlin pathologist Rudolf Virchow presented three human skeletons from the colony of German South West Africa to the Berlin Society for Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory. The remains had been looted from a grave by a young German scientist, Waldemar Belck, who was a member of the second Lüderitz expedition and took part in the occupation of colonial territory. In an attempt to re-individualise and re-humanise these human remains, which were anonymised in the course of their appropriation by Western science, the authors consult not only the colonial archive, but also contemporary oral history in Namibia. This allows for a detailed reconstruction of the social and political contexts of the deaths of the three men, named Jacobus Hendrick, Jacobus !Garisib and Oantab, and of Belck’s grave robbery, for an analysis of how the remains were turned into scientific objects by German science and institutions, as well as for an establishment of topographical and genealogical links with the Namibian present. Based on these findings, claims for the restitution of African human remains from German institutions cannot any longer be regarded as a contemporary phenomenon only but must be understood as part of an African tradition of resistance against Western colonial and scientific practices.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
An oral history

This book is an oral history of the punk scene in Belfast between 1977 and 1986. Interrogating the idea that punk was a non-sectarian subculture, it argues that the accounts of my interviewees suggest a more nuanced and complex relationship between the punk scene and Northern Irish society. Drawing on post-positivist oral history, the work of the Popular Memory Group and the cultural materialism of Raymond Williams, it considers how people’s memories of the punk scene have been shaped in the years since its zenith in the city and how they were shaped in the moment of the interview. Thinking of punk as a structure of feeling that is present in the oral history interview, the book suggests, is a way to draw out its relationship to structures of class, gender and sectarianism in Northern Ireland during the Troubles, and its continuing affective and political legacies in the present.

Synchronicity in Historical Research and Archiving Humanitarian Missions
Bertrand Taithe
,
Mickaël le Paih
, and
Fabrice Weissman

other institutional archives. They are prone to accidental deposits and deletions. They register power plays, conceptual variations and inconsistencies, debates and prejudices like any other organisational record. When they exist, more often than not, historians have had to complete them with oral history ( Golding and Hargreaves, 2018 ). Laurence Binet, who has compiled and edited from humanitarian archives a series of volumes on controversies that entailed public ‘speaking out’ by MSF

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps
,
Lasse Heerten
,
Arua Oko Omaka
,
Kevin O'Sullivan
, and
Bertrand Taithe

the acutely malnourished Biafran children to neighbouring West African countries. The survivors of the evacuation and their parents still have their experiences to share. I think scholars can recover most of these aspects of the war through oral history. Bibliography Bangarth , S. ( 2016 ), ‘The politics of African intervention: Canada and Biafra, 1967–70’ , in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs