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Kenneth Parker

Henry Manning’s (1808–92) transition from Anglican to Roman Catholic convert has not received the extensive attention that John Henry Newman’s journey to Roman Catholicism has received. Though more than a half dozen treatments have appeared in recent decades, newly acquired archival resources received by the Westminster Diocesan Archives in 2014 warrant a new appraisal of the events leading to his conversion. How could a committed adherent of the Oxford Movement, who did not initially follow Newman’s example in 1845, make the decision to leave the Church of his birth in 1851? What interior process enabled Archdeacon Henry Manning to preside over the assembly of Chichester clergy that condemned ‘papal aggression’ in 1850, and announce at the conclusion of the vote that he would be received into the Roman communion? This article outlines undercurrents in Manning’s thought, traces of which can be found in his undergraduate years, and considers concepts that culminated in the decision that changed his life, and guided his Roman Catholic ecclesial outlook. His role in shaping the agenda of Vatican I and the post-conciliar era heightens the significance of this background.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Joseph Webster

This chapter offers a detailed ethnographic analysis of the Grand Orange Lodge Archive as a space where Orangemen act as amateur historians to produce historical accounts which make sense of the claimed primordial sectarian conflict between Catholics and Protestants. The empirical focus is on three Orange archivists, plus visitors to the archive, and their discussions about how contemporary Scottish society and politics is being shaped by the long-standing threats of papal aggression, Irish republicanism, and Scottish nationalism. Analytically, the chapter makes use of new theories of conspiracism to suggest that Orange history-making offers members of the Order a coherent and powerful a theodicy with which to interpret the world around them. The chapter concludes by warning against exoticising such conspiracy beliefs, suggesting that there is a strong hermeneutic elective affinity between certain types of conspiracism and certain versions of anthropological theory-building.

in The religion of Orange politics
Geoffrey Hicks

’.78 Such a view of Conservative foreign policy bore little relation to reality, as Stanley went on to observe (and as chapter 4 explores). But the Conservatives certainly did not see the world in the same way as did their opponents. Their ‘mental maps’ were shaped by rather different priorities and perceptions; their position was determined by more than outrage about Palmerstonian excesses. ‘Papal aggression’ The political crisis that blew up in late 1850 and early 1851 as a result of the so-called ‘Papal aggression’ had little to do with Palmerstonian

in Peace, war and party politics
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Foreign affairs, domestic problems
Geoffrey Hicks

of Anglo-papal froideur, the British relationship with the Vatican had always been erratic and semi-official at best. The Whigs were not, of course, solely to blame for this state of affairs, but the ‘papal aggression’ furore, exacerbated by Russell, had hardly helped. This might not have mattered greatly, had it not had a bearing on a number of other issues. In purely diplomatic terms, the lack of a formal relationship with the Pope’s government made it difficult to protect British interests in the Papal States. The existing informal and overlapping arrangements

in Peace, war and party politics
The European Other in British cultural discourse
Menno Spiering

storylines. The Other is continental or ‘European’, and the Other is Roman Catholic. Anti-Catholicism experienced a revival in the second half of the nineteenth century because of the so-called ‘Papal Aggression’ of 1850, when Pope Pius IX made England and Wales an ecclesiastical province of the Roman Catholic Church. But other events also stoked the fire. The Great Famine of the 1840s resulted in an enormous influx of Irish-Catholic immigrants in England, and around the same time, the Oxford or Tractarian Movement drew much attention. The movement, led by influential

in The road to Brexit
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Carmen M. Mangion

pronouncement of Papal Infallibility in 1870 and the furore in 1872 over the inspection of convents.5 Every Guy Fawkes Day brought a reminder of the ‘other’ within England. Anti-Catholic rhetoric was vociferous. While there is no complete summary of the antiCatholic works published during each crisis, Robert J. Klaus has calculated that in the two-week period just after the restoration of the hierarchy in 1850, seventy-five anti-Catholic works were published.6 The following year, 1,673 petitions and 260,078 signatures remonstrated against the so-called ‘Papal Aggression’.7 5

in Contested identities
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Carmen M. Mangion

priests.6 3 4 5 6 Anthony Fahey, ‘Female Asceticism in the Catholic Church: A Case-Study of Nuns in Ireland in the Nineteenth Century’, doctoral thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1982, p. 154. Salvation was a prominent theme in many religious denominations during the nineteenth century; Salvationists, evangelicals and nonconformists all saw their efforts towards salvation as an important component of their spirituality. Robert J. Klaus, The Pope, the Protestants, and the Irish: Papal Aggression and AntiCatholicism in Mid-Nineteenth Century England

in Contested identities
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Martha Vandrei

creeping Romish incursion and of the seductive power of radical Protestantism were a growing Anglican preoccupation in the period after 1800. Anxieties increased with the repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts in 1828, followed quickly by Catholic Emancipation in 1829, and the reinstatement of a Catholic hierarchy in Britain in 1850, the so-­called ‘Papal Aggression’.26 In such an atmosphere, Claudia’s story had perennial valence as part of a narrative of the established Church’s independence from 66 Making and remaking saints Rome. Robert Southey gave it some

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
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Gareth Atkins

accorded Stephen’s Essays was understandable. For while fantastical stories published by flamboyant Catholic converts like Faber were easily laughed off, in the era of Papal Aggression and Pius IX ecumenical attempts to rehabilitate Loyola were always likely to fall on stony ground. The mid-­to late 1840s saw the publication of numerous analyses of the Society of Jesus which exposed unpalatable aspects of Ignatian thought, especially regarding education and spiritual training. Particularly disturbing was the insistence that members of the Society submit not just

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
Jim Cheshire

politics can be pinpointed from his public objection to the Tractarian George Anthony Denison. One of the many ‘Papal Aggression’ meetings around the county was held in Taunton Castle on 28 November 1850, and reported in The Times two days later. 30 Sanford proposed the first resolution condemning the corruption of the Roman Catholic church and specifically referred to the Romish infiltration of the Church of England through

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival