Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 122 items for :

  • "paranormal" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Surreal Englishness and postimperial Gothic in The Bojeffries Saga
Tony Venezia

, Bojeffries has been published across a variety of formats. The temptation is to speculate that Moore’s work at Warrior was subject to a Gothic curse that has prevented much of it from being republished in accessible formats. 4 Subtitled ‘a soap opera of the paranormal’, the Saga introduced the eccentric Bojeffries family who live in a council house for which they have not

in Alan Moore and the Gothic Tradition
Technology and spiritualism in nineteenth to twenty-first-century art and culture
Editors: and

Within the visual arts, speculation concerning the paranormal, haunting, spiritualism, and spirit photography expanded enormously in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Focusing on people's complex relationship with technology, this book explores our culture's continued fascination with the spectral, the ghostly and the paranormal. Informed by history and the visual tradition of spiritualism and psychical research, it cites that tradition within our contemporary concerns, such as landscape and environment, and recent technological developments. The book discusses the role of vitalism in contemporary theory, reflecting on what Bergson's interest in spiritualism suggests about the historical and theoretical complexities that lie behind the current uses of vitalism. It examines the twitching gestural engagements with a variety of devices, instruments, and technologies, including the typewriter, the pianola, the slate, and the phonograph. The book highlights that spiritualist phenomena are the result of mendacity on the one side and credulous belief on the other; Dada photomontage the result of painfully keen-eyed despair and a powerful drive to experiment. Resiting spirit photography and the production of 'ectoplasm' within the theatrical tradition of melodrama, the book considers spiritualist manifestations in terms of 'performances for camera'. It pays attention to exhibitions, staged in galleries in the UK and the United States between 2003 and 2007, which paired spirit photographs with examples of contemporary art photography. Finally, the book considers various spectral emanations moving across space and time, and across different discourses the work of John Ruskin, to discuss the relations between haunting and ecological catastrophe.

Abstract only
The strange science and true stories of the unseen other

This book follows a psychologist's quest to understand one of the most curious experiences known to humankind: the universal, disturbing feeling that someone or something is there when we are alone. What does this feeling mean and where does it come from? When and why do presences emerge? And how can we begin to understand a phenomenon that can be transformative for those who experience it and yet almost impossible to put into words? The answers to these questions lie in this tour-de-force through contemporary psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience and philosophy. Presence follows Ben Alderson-Day's attempts to understand how this experience is possible. The journey takes us to meet explorers, mediums and robots, and step through real, imagined and virtual worlds. Presence is the story of whom we carry with us, at all times, as parts of ourselves.

Spirit photography and contemporary art
Ben Burbridge

photographs organised by the American Museum of Photography in 2000 was followed by a major historical survey of similar pictures, produced by La Maison Européenne de la Photographie and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2004.4 A further set of exhibitions aimed to draw links between the early photographs and the interest shown in occult and paranormal phenomena by a range of contemporary artists. In this chapter I will be focusing on five such exhibitions, staged in galleries in the UK and the United States between 2003 and 2007, which paired spirit photographs with

in The machine and the ghost
Abstract only
Z Vesper, the Wilderness Garden, Powis Castle
Paul Evans

Lady's Bath do not exist. For those of us who watch Nigel Keane's The Stone Tape ( 1972 ), a television drama about the ability of stones in old buildings to store, record and transmit sounds and images of haunting apparitions, paranormal experiences (if that's what they are) can be represented by fringe science, accessible through knobs and dials like radio. Perhaps the bathers we hear are what psychical researchers call a veridical hallucination – an experience that conveys the idea of truth and yet is something unknown. Rosalind Heywood claims such apparitions

in EcoGothic gardens in the long nineteenth century
Commodification, corporeality and paranormal romance in Angela Carter’s beast tales
Bill Hughes

the vampires of paranormal romance, have emphasised the subjectivity of the werewolf, casting them as victims of ineluctable urges and as lovers, very often female. 1 This turn was anticipated by Angela Carter in her ‘beast tales’, by which I mean ‘Peter and the Wolf’ and most of the tales in the 1979 collection of transformed fairy tales, The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories . In these tales, metamorphoses between animal (often wolf) and human explore what costs are incurred in being animated, conscious flesh

in In the company of wolves
Abstract only
Technologies, spiritualisms, and modernities
Sas Mays
and
Neil Matheson

contemporary concerns. Such work is, in this sense, the primary object of the collection, since it critically and reflexively links past and present, tradition and modernity, continuation and disruption. Contemporary arts and the paranormal Within the visual arts, speculation concerning the paranormal, haunting, spiritualism, and spirit photography expanded enormously in the first decade of the twenty-first century, seeing a wide range of exhibitions focusing upon those topics, either in themed shows or in more historical exhibitions. Interest in these areas around the time

in The machine and the ghost
Abstract only
A history of female werewolves
Hannah Priest

discussion of the female werewolf’s integration into colonial discourse and narrative. My own Chapter 8 examines twenty-first-century young adult paranormal romance texts, considering the ways in which such texts associate lycanthropy with contemporary idealisations and constructions of the post-adolescent female. Other chapters consider patterns of presentation across specific media: Peter Hutchings in

in She-wolf
The moment of petrification in Children of the Stones
Peter Hughes Jachimiak

-budget – manipulation of sounds and images, especially in the petrification scene. Of greater significance is the realisation that Children of the Stones is more than an isolated moment; it is part of a much wider sonic-visual space-time continuum. This classic example of paranormal-fixated children's television of the late 1970s allowed its young viewers not only to connect with a Neolithic past but to contemplate – with its playful take on the cyclical nature of time – the far more nuanced relationship that the past, present and future hold to each other. And this reflects the

in Sound / image
Abstract only
A cultural history of female werewolves
Editor:

This book explores the cultural history of the female werewolf, from her first appearance in medieval literature to recent incarnations in film, television and popular literature. It focuses on folkloric records of the island of Saaremaa, Estonia, a territory in which, unusually, there are more folktales of female werewolves than male. The book also explores tropes and strategies of feminisation evident in Werewolf: The Apocalypse to reveal an almost unique disavowal of the masculine werewolf in favour of traditions of presenting the female werewolf. The examination of Honoré Beaugrand's 'The Werewolves' offers fruitful discussion of the female werewolf's integration into colonial discourse and narrative. In the nineteenth century, at the fin de siècle, female authors began to produce fiction about the female werewolf. Two of the most interesting examples of this, which have been curiously neglected by critics, are Clemence Housman's novella The Werewolf and Rosamund Marriott Watson's poem 'A Ballad of the Were-wolf', written under the pseudonym Graham R. Tomson and published in 1891. Then, the book examines twenty-first-century young adult paranormal romance texts, considering the ways in which such texts associate lycanthropy with contemporary idealisations and constructions of the post-adolescent female. It explores presentations of body-centred violence in film, drawing parallels between female werewolves and other violent females in horror cinema. Finally, the book also examines cinematic representations of the femme animale with an exploration of how this conceptualisation of the feminine might inform a reading of Ginger Snaps.