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Abstract only
Elisabeth Carter

2 Party ideology Parties of the extreme right are to some extent ‘masters of their own success’. That is, regardless of the political environment in which they operate and regardless of the institutional contexts within which they find themselves, their electoral success will depend, in part, on the ideology they espouse and the policies they put forward, and on the way in which they are organized and led. This chapter focuses on the first of these party-centric factors, and examines the extent to which the ideologies of the extreme right parties influence their

in The extreme right in Western Europe
Author:

This book provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of the five main parties of the extreme right in the Netherlands (Centrumdemocraten, Centrumpartij), Belgium (Vlaams Blok), and Germany (Die Republikaner, Deutsche Volksunion). Using primary research — including internal party documents — it concludes that rather than right-wing and extremist, the core ideology of these parties is xenophobic nationalist, including also a mix of law and order and welfare chauvinism. The author's research and conclusions have broader implications for the study of the extreme-right phenomenon and party ideology in general.

At liberty to protest
Author:

Issues around the policing of public order and political expression are as topical today as in the past. This book explores the origins of the National Council for Civil Liberties (NCCL) that emerged in 1934 in protest at the policing of political extremes. It discusses the police attempts to discredit the NCCL and the use of Special Branch intelligence to perpetuate a view of the organisation as a front for the Communist Party. The book analyses the vital role played by the press and the prominent, well-connected backing for the organisation and provides a detailed discussion on the formation of the NCCL. The use of plain clothes police officers was a particularly sensitive matter and the introduction of the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) and subsequently Special Branch was controversial. The book examines the nature of the support for a civil liberties pressure group, the political orientation of the organisation, its place in non-party ideology and its role in a political culture. Liberal Internationalism, pacifist groups and women's organisations are also considered. The book then discusses the NCCL's networks, methods and associations through which it was able to bring complaints about legislation and police behaviour to public attention and into the parliamentary arena. Public, press, police and ministerial responses to the NCCL's activities form a focal point. Finally, it reviews the ongoing role and changing political relationships of the NCCL following Ronald Kidd's death in 1942, alongside the response of the police and Home Office to the emerging new regime.

Elisabeth Carter

the right-wing extremist party vote: the story so far Chapter 2 began the analysis by investigating the influence of different types of right-wing extremist party ideology, and examined whether rightwing extremist electoral success has been associated with a specific type of right-wing extremist ideology, or whether, conversely, the nature of a party’s ideology has not been related to its electoral fortunes in any way. In the first 202 The extreme right in Western Europe instance, Chapter 2 suggested that right-wing extremist party ideology is far from uniform. More

in The extreme right in Western Europe
Cas Mudde

chap1 28/5/02 13.30 Page 1 1 The extreme right party family Studies of political parties have been based on a multiplicity of both scholarly and political theories, and have focused on a variety of internal and external aspects. As is common within the scientific community, complaints have been voiced about the lack of knowledge in particular areas of the field, such as party (as) organisations (Mair 1994), party ideology (Von Beyme 1985), and minor or small parties (Fischer 1980; Müller-Rommel 1991). However, even though a lot of work certainly remains to

in The ideology of the extreme right
Open Access (free)
Party system change and electoral prospects
Gilles Ivaldi

traditional bipolar format of French politics. It will then move on to analyse the historical and political factors underlying the split, the electoral performances of the two parties that emerged from this critical breakdown and the key features of party ideology within the extreme, right pole. Third, it will address the electoral prospects of the FN and MNR in the light of their results in the presidential and legislative elections of spring 2002. Extreme-right politics and party system change in the mid-1990s A glance at the results of elections over the past fifteen

in The French party system
Jenny Andersson

society’s framings and particularly the standing of growth in party ideology. But in the transition between the 1960s and 1970s, a gradual process began where the SAP’s defensive position and ambivalent reactions to the critique were replaced by ideological rearticulation and eventually with a break with the strong society’s framings. In this process, the SAP incorporated the metaphors and definitions of

in Between growth and security
Abstract only
Mark Garnett
and
Kevin Hickson

brought in something alien to the Conservative Partyideology. This view was expressed most vocally by Ian Gilmour, who prided himself on his lack of ideology (a view that will be examined critically in this book).2 Others argued that in fact the Thatcher Governments had not been pragmatic but had instead been part of the authentic Conservative tradition, which the Party had neglected in the years after 1945. Of those discussed in the book, this view was expressed by Peter Utley and Shirley Letwin.3 The most sophisticated academic expression of this approach to the

in Conservative thinkers
Abstract only
Jenny Andersson

of the third way experiment in the 1980s and the party seems to be uncomfortably stuck in the gap between these two legacies. To conclude, I would suggest that a central point of change in Swedish social democratic thought, discussed in the previous pages, is the gradual acceptance in party ideology of a group in Swedish society that is not productive and that constantly falls behind. The empirical

in Between growth and security
Janet Clark

organisation and introduces a detailed discussion on the formation of the NCCL. Chapter three examines the nature of the support for a civil liberties pressure group, the political orientation of the organisation, its place in non-party ideology and its role in a political culture that included Liberal Internationalism, pacifist groups and women’s organisations. A discussion around the personal agendas of a number of the NCCL’s leading supporters will show that changing forms of political expression, divisive party politics and the marginalisation of Labour politicians

in The National Council for Civil Liberties and the policing of interwar politics