Abstract only

– Lily Campbell’s argument for each tragedy’s ruling passion, John Draper’s naming of each character’s temperament. 2 Of special interest is Paster’s work: passions in English Renaissance drama closely relate to bodily elements and humoral fluids, though some characters boast a ‘humour’ just to gain social status. I am deeply indebted to Paster, but seek to widen her materialist

in Renaissance psychologies
Intoxication and Romanticism

6 Ungovernable passions: intoxication and Romanticism He will come to know it, whenever he shall arrive in that state in which, paradoxical as it may appear, reason shall only visit him through intoxication. (Charles Lamb) Hence the drunkard ceases to attend to external stimuli, and as volition is now also suspended, the trains of his ideas become totally inconsistent as in dreams or delirium. (Erasmus Darwin) The question above all others that nagged at philosophers, political thinkers and doctors throughout the eighteenth century was: ‘What is it to be human

in The politics of alcohol
Renaissance emotion across body and soul

IN THE STUDY OF Renaissance emotion, especially in relation to Shakespeare and his contemporaries, it doesn’t take long before coming across the work of Thomas Wright ( c. 1561–1623). 1 His The Passions of the Minde in Generall , first published in 1601, has become something of a touchstone for literary scholars, offering

in The Renaissance of emotion

Elemental Passions CHAPTER 4 Interpretive synopsis of Elemental Passions One: prologue The first chapter can be regarded as a Prologue. Irigaray begins with short, staccato sentences. White. Immense spaces. White, a rush of breath. Be swift, marry this breath. Remain in it. Make haste. Let it not abandon me. Let me not turn from it. Be swept up: my song. (EP 7) De grands espaces. Blancs. Un grand souffle, blanc. Rapide, épouser ce souffle. Y rester. Dans la hâte. Qu’il ne m’abandonne pas. Que je ne le laisse pas.Y être entraînée : mon chant. (Pe 7) The short

in Forever fluid
Abstract only
Collecting and connoisseurship

no expense in pursuing his passion – the building of a hothouse stood testament to his botanical ambitions. 111 He employed a gardener, Joseph Knight, who resided full time on the property, tending to the collection. Knight remained in George’s employ until the family removed from Clapham in 1820, at which point he gave Knight his living collection. Knight went on to form the

in The bonds of family
Revealing the unconscious in chiastic symmetry

of the tragedies, especially King Lear, the impoverished venue where epiphany gains full effect in Shakespeare’s works. Lear’s empathetic defence of Tom, the Bethlehem beggar who is terrified of fiends and obsessed with his sins, matches Southwell’s allegory of the Passion in Spiritual Exercises

in Renaissance psychologies
Abandonment

418 7 Brian Moore, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1955): abandonment But what if the godless were right …? We are quite a few pages into The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne before discovering Judith Hearne’s drinking habit,1 and it is then that we begin to realise how her drinking is entangled with a growing intimation that God is no longer part of her life. Alienated through ostensibly social causes such as her ‘odd duck’ physical appearance and family responsibility, the character’s dulling of reality through drink is also her response to the kind of

in The Existential drinker
Popular imperialism in Britain, continuities and discontinuities over two centuries

back to families, 9 helped to keep the existence and significance of colonies continually in the forefront of the public imagination. Earlier manifestations It is important to recognise that in the British case, these imperial passions were not wholly new in the nineteenth century. Kathleen Wilson has charted the significance of aspects of popular imperialism in the eighteenth

in European empires and the people
The Devil’s Larder (2001) and Six [Genesis] (2003)

chap 5 27/7/06 8:19 am Page 155 5 Excess, passion and the uncanny: The Devil’s Larder (2001) and Six [Genesis] (2003) The Devil’s Larder As Crace explains, the choice of food as the interlinking theme and subject matter for The Devil’s Larder is not simply gastronomic, but reflects a series of cultural and personal changes, often quite radical ones, which have taken place during his lifetime. He recalls the dreariness of the food in the immediate postwar period and the significance of the transitions that followed: During my lifetime, this is one of the

in Jim Crace
Reading Extremities in Orra and De Monfort

At the time of their publication, Joanna Baillie‘s dramas were considered to be works of genius in their sustained and powerful fixation on one of the several possible human passions. In their very focus on these intense emotions, however, the plays actually reified the dangers inherent in the extremes of human passion. In other words, by fixing her attention on the passions, Baillie revealed that the emotions she was supposedly focused on often masked other, even more powerful desires. Thus, in Orra fear is the result of the heroines hatred of male dominance, while in De Monfort hatred is shown to be the symptom of incestuous love. But what has not been noticed about Baillie‘s plays is their almost obsessive interest in dead, abjected male bodies. Both plays present a very gothic vision of the indestructible patriarchy, an uncanny phallic power that cannot die, that persistently resurrects and feeds on itself or the legends that it has constructed.

Gothic Studies