Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,483 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
The Lord hath given, the Lord hath taken away
J. J. Anderson

Introduction Patience is a poem of the same kind as Cleanness in that it too combines discussion of a moral quality with biblical narrative – in the case of Patience , one narrative only, the story of Jonah. In both poems human beings are at odds with God, but the outcomes are very different. Cleanness has a God who subordinates his mercy to his justice, Patience a God who subordinates justice to mercy. Death threatens, but no one dies. Cleanness is cosmic in scale and uncompromising in its message and its rhetoric: On spec of a spote ( Cleanness

in Language and imagination in the Gawain-poems
Open Access (free)
James Baldwin and Malcolm X
Mikko Tuhkanen

Taking its cue from recent scholarly work on the concept of time in African American literature, this essay argues that, while both James Baldwin and Malcolm X refuse gradualism and insist on “the now” as the moment of civil rights’ fulfillment, Baldwin also remains troubled by the narrowness assumed by a life, politics, or ethics limited to the present moment. In his engagement with Malcolm’s life and legacy—most notably in One Day, When I Was Lost, his screen adaptation of Malcolm’s autobiography—he works toward a temporal mode that would be both punctual and expansive. What he proposes as the operative time of chronoethics is an “untimely now”: he seeks to replace Malcolm’s unyielding punctuality with a different nowness, one that rejects both calls for “patience,” endemic to any politics that rests on the Enlightenment notion of “perfectibility,” and the breathless urgency that prevents the subject from seeing anything beyond the oppressive system he wants overthrown. Both thinkers find the promise of such untimeliness in their sojourns beyond the United States.

James Baldwin Review
The Aid Industry and the ‘Me Too’ Movement
Charlotte Lydia Riley

why these behaviours flourish in the sector in the first place. Acknowledgements I would like to thank Róisín Read for her patience and support in bringing this article to fruition and the other editors at JHA for their helpful editorial suggestions; I would also like to thank Phil Child and David Hudson, with whom I discussed these issues at the ‘Responding to the Oxfam Scandal’ seminar at the University of Birmingham in May 2018. Additional

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Expanding Gender Norms to Marriage Drivers Facing Boys and Men in South Sudan
Michelle Lokot, Lisa DiPangrazio, Dorcas Acen, Veronica Gatpan, and Ronald Apunyo

, Consent, and Choice in Early Marriage: Ethnographic Perspectives from Urban Tanzania ’, Marriage & Family Review , 54 : 6 , 565 – 81 . Stern , O. ( 2011 ), ‘ “This is How Marriage Happens Sometimes”: Women and Marriage in South Sudan ’, in Bubenzer , F. and Stern , O. (eds.), Hope, Pain & Patience: The Lives of Women in South Sudan ( Johannesburg : Jacana Media ), pp. 1 – 23 . UNICEF ( 2014 ), Hidden in Plain sight: A Statistical Analysis of Violence Against Children , www.unicef.org/reports/hidden-plain-sight (accessed

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

his wife and baby, and Asma’s daughter returned home to her parents. Asma thought her son-in-law irresponsible, but also found her daughter immature. ‘In my generation, girls were more ready to be the head of the family at the age of 18. There was greater patience.’ While her oldest daughter now stays at home with her child, Asma tries to support her husband through her income from occasional NGO trainings. Mothers’ old social and new economic responsibilities thus become

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: J. J. Anderson

This book is an open-ended critical account of the Gawain-poems. The four poems of MS Cotton Nero A.x, Art. 3 are untitled in the manuscript, but titled by modern editors, in manuscript order: Pearl, Cleanness (or Purity), Patience, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. The poems testify that he was cultivated, with an appreciation of the finer points of chivalric life, and also deeply religious - a cleric, no doubt, given his biblical knowledge, his interest in Christian doctrine, and his understanding of sermon style. Pearl is a religious dream-vision in which the dream is largely taken up by dialogue between the narrator or dreamer, as a figure in his dream, and a woman who is a fount of divine wisdom. Cleanness combines discussion of a religious virtue with retelling of stories from the Bible. Its three main stories are from the Old Testament, and they centre on Noah, Sodom and Gomorrah, and Belshazzar's feast. Patience is a poem that combines discussion of a moral quality with biblical narrative, in the case of Patience, one narrative only, the story of Jonah.Sir Gawain is a record of, and tribute to, the beauties and pleasures of chivalric life. Pearl, Cleanness, and Patience suggest that for the poet national events may have merged with events in his own life to challenge his faith. With Gawain too it is possible that the public and the personal intermingle to shake his faith in chivalry and the feudal model of social order.

Abstract only
Europeans, Muslim Immigrants and the onus of European–Jewish Histories
Author: Amikam Nachmani

Relations between Europe and its Muslim minorities constitute an extensive focus for discussion both within and beyond the Continent. This book reports on the years mainly between 2005 and 2015 and focuses on the exploitation of recent European history when describing relations and the prospects for the nominally 'Christian' majority and Muslim minority. The discourse often references the Jews of Europe as a guiding precedent. The manifold references to the annals of the Jews during the 1930s, the Second World War and the Holocaust, used by both the Muslim minorities and the European 'white' (sic) majority presents an astonishing and instructive perspective. When researching Europe and its Muslim minorities, one is astonished by the alleged discrimination that the topic produces, in particular the expressions embodied in Islamophobia, Europhobia and anti-Semitism. The book focuses on the exemplary European realities surrounding the 'triangular' interactions and relations between the Europeans, Muslims and Jews. Pork soup, also known as 'identity soup', has been used as a protest in France and Belgium against multicultural life in Europe and against the Muslim migrants who allegedly enjoyed government benefits. If the majority on all sides of the triangle were to unite and marginalize the extreme points of the triangle, not by force but by goodwill, reason and patience, then in time the triangle would slowly but surely resolve itself into a circle. The Jews, Christians, Muslims and non-believers of Europe have before them a challenge.

Abstract only
J. J. Anderson

The four poems of MS Cotton Nero A.x, Art. 3, are untitled in the manuscript, but titled by modern editors, in manuscript order Pearl, Cleanness (or Purity ), Patience , and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight . This is the only manuscript containing any of them, and it gives no clear information as to by whom and for whom it, or they, were produced, and whether or not they are all by the same author. There is no external evidence either which settles any of these matters. They must to a degree be regarded as poems without contexts. All that can be gleaned

in Language and imagination in the Gawain-poems
Abstract only
The poet and his times
J. J. Anderson

: Royal Historical Society, 1954 ), p. 216. The language of Cleanness conveys an intense reaction against filth, in which physical and metaphysical notions of filth are inextricably mixed. Behind the gruesome imagery of death and decay may lie the poet’s horror at the effects of the plague on the human body, and, equally, of his horror at the sinful state of his world and God’s reaction to it. One of the many ways in which Patience may be seen both as complementing and moving on from Cleanness is that it responds to the crisis of its times not with ‘repent ye for

in Language and imagination in the Gawain-poems
Abstract only
Sally Dux

controversial content, particularly in respect of their representations of history and historical figures, with less attention paid to Atten­borough’s style. Attenborough has employed his many skills of negotiation, ­persistence and patience to achieve many of his objectives. His long quest to realise Gandhi and the Oscar success he enjoyed has made Attenborough internationally renowned, and provided the pivotal point of his career. Yet, Gandhi’s Oscar success appears to have lessened his standing in scholarly terms, leading, at least partially, to his subsequent academic

in Richard Attenborough