Elite European migrants in the British Empire

While most of the Germans who suffered expulsion during the First World War lived within British shores, the Royal Navy brought Germans from throughout the world to face incarceration in the their network of camp. This book offers a new interpretation of global migration from the early nineteenth until the early twentieth century. It examines the elite German migrants who progressed to India, especially missionaries, scholars and scientists, businessmen and travellers. The book investigates the reasons for the migration of Germans to India. An examination of the realities of German existence in India follows. It then examines the complex identities of the Germans in India in the century before the First World War. The role of the role of racism, orientalism and Christianity is discussed. The stereotypes that emerged from travelogues include: an admiration of Indian landscapes; contempt for Hinduism; criticism of the plight of women; and repulsion at cityscapes. The book moves to focus upon the transformation which took place as a result of this conflict, mirroring the plight of Germans in other parts of the world. The marginalisation which took place in 1920 closely mirrored the plight of the German communities throughout the British Empire. The unique aspect of the experience in India consisted of the birth of a national identity. Finally, the book places the experience of the Germans in India into four contexts: the global history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; German history; history of the British Empire in India; and Indian history.

Unveiling American Muslim women in Rolla Selbak’s Three Veils (2011)

in its invariably supportive depiction of Leila’s plight. 2 Arguably, an Arab American community might have forced her to marry Ali and to put family honour before women’s rights. However, Selbak’s fictional gesture advocates a growing sensitivity towards the plights of women, while challenging Western perspectives on Muslim communities which label them as inexorably patriarchal. Selbak thus attempts to strike a representational balance, enacting a critique of Islamic patriarchal attitudes while challenging calcified Western views on Islam and Muslims

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Community engagement and lifelong learning

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

Open Access (free)

were allowed to vote in 1918 and 21-year olds (the age of male suffrage) followed in 1928. But women’s suffrage was not the breakthrough which it might at first appear. It had been hoped, and even assumed, that once women were given a political voice many other benefits would automatically follow. With politicians now accountable to women and seeking their votes, surely they would begin to listen to demands for further concessions. Furthermore, the movement had been almost exclusively middle class in character. There was little interest in the plight of women in

in Understanding British and European political issues
Abstract only
Thinking across

heterosexist, is also tuning itself to the diverse plights of women. Finally, interrogating the position of the Muslim self in queer time and place allowed us to investigate Abdellah Taïa’s postcolonial queer melancholia, triggered by social injustice in the postcolonial nation and by systemic homophobia, while offering Sufism, women’s religiosity, and queer diasporic fraternity as places of safety against the strictures of racism and Islamicate heteronormativity. We then examined how Rabih Alameddine’s Druze sensibility sutures religious traditions

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film

this narrative, widespread support could be achieved.13 ‘The women seemed to be the special object of the rage of these [?] soldiers’. James Wroe’s comment in the Manchester Observer on 21 August is illustrative of the narrative regarding the treatment of women conveyed in the press.14 In The Times on 19 August, John Tyas describes ‘a woman on the ground, insensible, to all outward appearance, and with two large gouts of blood on her left breast.’15 The plight of women at Peterloo was also addressed on 21 August in the Leeds Mercury which states: ‘Sex itself could

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Social reform in Manchester

receive less pay than their male counterparts, they were subjected to frequent sexual harassment and unsanitary crudities. Cooper portrayed the cotton mills as cramped, filthy quarters, describing how the winding room floor was invariably drenched with menstrual blood because women rarely had access to sanitary protection.45 The Manchester and Salford Trades’ Council was not entirely sympathetic to the plight of women in the workplace. The councils’ president, R.W. Walters, believed that ‘the proper place of woman was not in the workshop but at home.’46 In January 1895

in Eva Gore-Booth

plight of women and the structural forms of patriarchy, and how the courage of women who appear in the narrative can be channelled in the direction of action, collective or otherwise, to help transform these structures. One can contrast the machismo showing off of males against the more humble and life-​centred values surrounding women depicted in this kind of pageantry, an observation that can stimulate a variety of issues up for debate. Art Communal celebrations or commemorations such as Holy Week, with its plethora of different forms of artistic expression and

in Higher education in a globalising world

that, when adapted to Blake's purposes, can only be termed, in advance of Deleuze and Guattari, a schizoanalytic approach to poetic and textual production. The work, simply stated, analyses the plight of women, who occupy the space of jouissance (for the male subject) and thereby are forced to function as the sought object (Lacan's objet a ) in a competition between two competing forms of the masculine. This oppressive state of the feminine

in William Blake's Gothic imagination

the plight of women left destitute when deserted by their husbands. 92 This Freethinker was also a strong supporter of ‘Free Love, based on the premise that only men and women themselves could decide with whom to form a union and for how long this should last. He was not, however, particularly concerned with the systemic inequalities which made this a far more attractive prospect for men than for women. 93 Thus, the

in Infidel feminism