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Ideas, knowledge and policy change
Author: Alex Balch

Labour migration has become one of the hot topics in Europe, especially since 2000 with the shift from restriction to managed migration. This book provides an account of policy change over labour migration in Europe during this new era of governance. It has implications for debates about the contemporary governance of labour migration in Europe, and questions about the impact of an emergent EU migration regime in the context of a globalising labour market. The key findings offer a deeper understanding of the linkages between those engaged in policymaking and the kinds of communities that produce usable knowledge.

Promises and pitfalls

This edited volume examines how and under which conditions foreign policy analysis can be enriched by “domestic realm” public policy approaches, concepts, and theories. Public policy scholars dealing with the analysis of domestic policy fields, such as social and economic policy, interior affairs, or environmental policy, use a broad array of heuristics, concepts, and theories, including, for example, multiple streams, advocacy coalition or punctuated equilibrium approaches. However, the possible contribution of such approaches to the analysis of foreign policy has yet to be fully explored. With this purpose in mind, this edited volume devotes a chapter each on a selection of arguably the most important domestic public policy approaches and examines their transferability and adaptability to foreign policy analysis. Thereby the book points out how bridging the intra-disciplinary divide between the analysis of public policy and foreign policy can enrich foreign policy studies and shows how exactly foreign policy analysis can benefit from broadening its instruments for analysis. The edited volume also discusses under what conditions such a transfer is less promising due to the “sui generis” character of foreign policy.

Hegemony, policy and the rhetoric of ‘sustainable aviation’

The massive expansion of global aviation, its insatiable demand for airport capacity, and its growing contribution to carbon emissions, makes it a critical societal problem. Alongside traditional concerns about noise and air pollution, and the disruption of local communities, airport politics has been connected to the problems of climate change and peak oil. Yet it is still thought to be a driver of economic growth and connectivity in an increasingly mobile world.

The Politics of Airport Expansion in the UK provides the first in-depth analysis of the protest campaigns and policymaking practices that have marked British aviation since the construction of Heathrow Airport. Grounded in documentary analysis, interviews and policy texts, it constructs and employs poststructuralist policy analysis to delineate the rival rhetorical and discursive strategies articulated by the coalitions seeking to shape public policy.

Focusing on attempts by New Labour to engineer an acceptable policy of ‘sustainable aviation’, the book explores its transformation into a ‘wicked policy issue’ that defies a rational and equitable policy solution. It details the challenges posed to government by the rhetoric of scientific discourse and expert knowledge, and how the campaign against the third runway at Heathrow turned local residents, the perpetual ‘losers’ of aviation expansion, into apparent ‘winners’. It concludes by evaluating the challenges facing environmentalists and government in the face of concerted pressures from the aviation industry to expand.

This book will appeal to scholars and researchers of environmental policy and politics, poststructuralist political theory, social movements, and transport studies.

Theory and methods
Alex Balch

3 Developing the approach: theory and methods Introduction As explained in Chapter 1, when thinking about ideas and knowledge in policy change it is useful to think about the different possible ways they could play a role in terms of who, what, where and how. This device can operate as a kind of analytical road-map to help differentiate between alternative theoretical approaches to policy-making, which are likely to vary in these respects owing to differences in their underlying assumptions. However, before turning to each framework, it is worth considering how

in Managing labour migration in Europe
Kai Oppermann and Klaus Brummer

overview of how they have been applied in public policy. Then, the transferability of such approaches to foreign policy is discussed. This is followed by an empirical illustration of veto player studies in foreign policy, pertaining to changes in Germany’s policy regarding the foreign deployment of its armed forces. Veto player approaches in public policy The main objective of veto player approaches is to explain and predict the potential for policy change across different political systems and issue areas. The key

in Foreign policy as public policy?
Odeas, knowledge and policy change
Alex Balch

7 Managing migration in the UK and Spain: ideas, knowledge and policy change This book is, in part, a response to the demand that in order to understand contemporary European policy-making we should look at ‘ideas, knowledge and expertise, rather than pure interest’ (Richardson 2005: 6). By choosing to compare two of the EU’s major labour importers in the twenty-first century it tells us about the contemporary governance of migration in Europe, and seeks to overcome the methodological nationalism often associated with migration research (Wimmer and Schiller

in Managing labour migration in Europe
Jonathan J. Pierce and Katherine C. Hicks

The advocacy coalition framework (ACF) is an actor-specific theory of the policy process. The unit of analysis is the policy subsystem, within which advocacy coalitions compete to translate their beliefs into public policy. The framework is based on a series of assumptions at the systemic, meso-, and individual levels of analysis (Sabatier and Weible 2007 ), and identifies three theories: advocacy coalitions, policy learning, and policy change (Sabatier and Jenkins-Smith 1999 ; Jenkins-Smith et al. 2014 ). The framework has been applied hundreds of times

in Foreign policy as public policy?
Abstract only
Labour migration policy change in Spain
Alex Balch

4 Case study one: labour migration policy change in Spain Introduction At the end of 2003 a group of migration experts gathered to publish a short note on the Spanish government’s immigration policy. The text described policy as ethically obscene, politically dangerous, juridically inadmissible, and summed it up as ‘legal apartheid’.1 The ‘Madrid Manifesto’ was an unprecedented castigation of government policy, and was a direct reaction to the change in direction that had been taken post-2000, in particular the legislative reform of November 2003 passed by the

in Managing labour migration in Europe
Abstract only
Alex Balch

findings offer a deeper understanding of the links between those engaged in policymaking and the kinds of epistemic communities that produce usable knowledge. This is achieved by making more explicit the links between ideas and policy change and applying theoretical frameworks, which BAL_01.indd 1 5/6/2010 9:48:12 AM 2 Managing labour migration in Europe specify the relationship more clearly between ideas, actors and the policy process (Haas 1992; Hajer 1993; Sabatier 1993). The growing world of think tanks (Stone 2002a) and the widening of those involved in policy

in Managing labour migration in Europe
Socialisation and the domestic reception of international norms
Kelly Kollman

Kollman 03_Tonra 01 03/12/2012 12:17 Page 44 3 International policy diffusion: socialisation and the domestic reception of international norms Despite potential synergies, to date lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) politics and international relations (IR) scholars have done their best to ignore one another. The stark temporal and regional clustering of LGBT rights expansion and SSU implementation in western societies since 1989 strongly hints at common international sources of influence. The existence of convergent national policy change alone

in The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies