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Author: Ilan Danjoux

Cartoon analysis is the study of a non-elite communication. Ilan Danjoux examined over 1200 Israeli and Palestinian editorial cartoons to explore whether changes in their content anticipated the outbreak of the Al-Aqsa Intifada in October of 2000. Political Cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict provide readers an engaging introduction to cartoon analysis and a novel insight into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Conflict researchers benefit from paying attention to popular fears because they influence the policies of career-minded politicians and autocratic leaders seeking to placate domestic dissent. The book begins by outlining the rationale for this research project, while explaining the choice of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a case study. It identifies the challenges of cartoon research and outlines the methodological approaches available to researchers. After laying the framework for this study, the book details the collapse of the Israel-Palestinian Peace Process into full-scale violence by October 2000. A description of Israeli and Palestinian media production follows. The book demonstrates the cartoon's ability to chronicle changes in conflict. Not only did both Israeli and Palestinian cartoons change their focus with the outbreak of violence, the mood of cartoons also shifted. It also shows that Israeli and Palestinian cartoons also changed the way that each portrayed the other. Changes in both Israeli and Palestinian cartoons corresponded with, but did not precede, the outbreak of the Al-Aqsa Intifada.

Legacies and departures
Editor: Janet Clare

This volume challenges a traditional period divide of 1660, exploring continuities with the decades of civil war, the Republic and Restoration and shedding new light on religious, political and cultural conditions before and after the restoration of church and monarchy. The volume marks a significant development in transdisciplinary studies, including, as it does, chapters on political theory, religion, poetry, pamphlets, theatre, opera, portraiture, scientific experiment and philosophy. Chapters show how unresolved issues at national and local level, residual republicanism and religious dissent, were evident in many areas of Restoration life, and recorded in plots against the regime, memoirs, diaries, historical writing, pamphlets and poems. An active promotion of forgetting, the erasing of memories of the Republic and the reconstruction of the old order did not mend the political, religious and cultural divisions that had opened up during the civil wars. In examining such diverse genres as women’s writing, the prayer book, prophetic writings, the publications of the Royal Society, histories of the civil wars by Clarendon and Hobbes, the poetry and prose of Milton and Marvell, plays and opera, court portraiture and political cartoons the volume substantiates its central claim that the Restoration was conditioned by continuity and adaptation of linguistic and artistic discourses.

Ilan Danjoux

eventually published on 30 September 2005. For example, Laus Seidel drew the prophet standing in front of desert scenery that more closely resembled an artistic portrait than the biting satire traditionally associated with political cartoons. Franz Füchsel took the opportunity criticize the contest itself by depicting Mohammed telling two armed militants to ‘Relax guys, it’s just a drawing made by some

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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Ilan Danjoux

FEW PEOPLE appreciate the skill required to read political cartoons. Unlike the background information that accompanies newspaper articles or the captions that frame newspaper photographs, editorial cartoons provide readers few identifiers or descriptors needed to identify new actors or concepts. Instead, cartoons use a combination of physical distortion, cultural references and visual

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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A cartoon analysis of conflict
Ilan Danjoux

STUDYING POLITICAL cartoons has made me both more certain of the insight they offer to conflict research and more cautious when reading them. The controversy surrounding the Jyllands Posten cartoons exemplifies the ease with which a cartoon’s meaning can be misconstrued. A selective sample of offensive cartoons, combined with three forgeries, was used to substantiate

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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Ilan Danjoux

THIS BOOK began as an attempt to understand the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It quickly evolved into a research project on political cartoons. Its journey from an international relations study of the Middle East conflict to a cartoon analysis of public opinion forced me across disciplinary divides that locate this work at the intersection of international relations, media

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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Ilan Danjoux

OVER THE COURSE of this research, people with whom I have discussed this project have sent me links and news of cartoons, comics, graphic novels, children books and even animated movies. This flood of support made me realize how difficult it can be to distinguish political cartoons from caricatures, paintings or doodles. Caricature is a quintessential feature of the editorial

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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Ilan Danjoux

A QUINTESSENTIAL FEATURE of political cartoons is their ability to reduce a complex situation into a binary clash of interests. Politics become a battle of opposites, where good fights evil, outsiders threaten insiders and victims resist oppressors. The most articulate and detailed newspaper report cannot match the clarity of political cartoons, simply because real life is

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Political prints of the Popish Plot and Exclusion Crisis – the revision of a republican mode
Christina M. Carlson

326 Chapter 16 ‘A Child of Heathen Hobbs’:1 political prints of the Popish Plot and Exclusion Crisis –​the revision of a republican mode Christina M. Carlson A most scandalous libel against the Government for which with other things [Stephen] College was most justly executed. — Narcissus Luttrell, hand-​written comment on College’s political cartoon, A Ra-​ree Show (1681) Introduction T his chapter analyses popular forms of political and propagandistic response to the Popish Plot and Exclusion Crisis of 1678–​81, focusing on political cartoons and satirical

in From Republic to Restoration
A case study in colonial Bildungskarikatur
Albert D. Pionke and Frederick Whiting

As Richard Scully and Andrekos Varnava note in their introduction to this volume, political cartoons, comics, and caricatures have yet to find an equal place alongside more traditional objects of historical study, and are often relegated to illustrating, both literally and figuratively, supposedly more substantial historical phenomena. One might make a similar observation about the role of graphic texts in a large proportion of literary scholarship, which similarly deploys them more for effect, or affect, rather than subjecting them to the

in Comic empires