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Abstract only
Scott Wilson

7 Mom and pop rage ‘Pain is God’ (Korn, ‘Kill You’, 1996) Children of the Korn By associating cunnilingus with a Tootsie commercial aimed at children, Lil’ Kim’s ‘How Many Licks’ mischievously risks broaching one of the biggest taboos in American culture. From the prohibition on stem cell research and the struggle over abortion, to the Parent Music Resource Center and moral panics about paedophilia and internet child pornography, childhood innocence provides the last sacred object for the sustained erection of paternal law in America. Medical science, First

in Great Satan’s rage
American negativity and rap/metal in the age of supercapitalism
Author: Scott Wilson

The seductive force of American supercapitalism unlocks new markets, unleashing the energy of desire, and provides a destructive version of Satan's rage. At the vanguard of this seduction has been the youthful rage and rebellion of the devil's music, American rock 'n' roll and its multiple related subgenres. This book looks at the most pervasive forms of American popular music in the post-cold-war period. Gangsta rap exploits and informs the consumption of luxury brands. The 'mom and pop rage' of the nu metal bands self-consciously exposes itself as the violent expression, the excess of the implacable banal excess, and of shopping-mall consumerism. The book explores the negativity and the 'niggativity' of American rap/metal in the 1990s in relation to a number of key events in the decade such as the Rodney King riots and the Columbine High School massacre. On the face of it, the gangsta 'nigga' is an unlikely point of identification for suburban white culture. But the phenomenon of the 'wigga' (white, wanna-be-nigga) and the success of companies like Nike testify to the fascination that such a figure holds. Rage Against the Machine (also known as Rage or RATM) do not normally have problems with machines, indeed their music and living depend upon them. Rather, the 'machine' is for Rage another word for the new world order of global capitalism. Death metal groups such as Morbid Angel and Deicide aim to outdo the others in its singular relation to death, shock and outrage.

Abstract only
Scott Wilson

. In a different way, the ‘mom and pop rage’ of the nu metal bands self-consciously exposes itself as the violent expression, the excess of the implacable banal excess, of shopping-mall consumerism and its nihilistic standardisation and reduction of life and experience. Second, popular music also provides a focus for the negativity of American neoconservatism that discloses its conformity with its Islamicist enemies. In his influential book The Closing of the American Mind (1987), Allan Bloom, the neoconservative ideologue, condemns popular music in exactly the same

in Great Satan’s rage
Abstract only
Scott Wilson

increasingly by contract. It is apparently already possible in America to divorce one’s parents; soon perhaps it will be possible to divorce one’s children. 148 Great Satan’s rage Even the incest taboo is dissolving, as it must, in an age of sperm banks, in vitro fertilisation and genetic manipulation. Replacing paternity and the taboo on incest, however, is a general sacralisation and eroticisation of the child. As we have seen, the ‘mom and pop rage’ of the post-baby-boomer generation, evident in the lyrics of Korn and other nu metal bands, has almost established child

in Great Satan’s rage