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What rough beast?
Series: Irish Society

This book explores the issue of a collective representation of Ireland after the sudden death of the 'Celtic Tiger' and introduces the aesthetic idea that runs throughout. The focus is on the idea articulated by W. B. Yeats in his famous poem 'The Second Coming'. The book also explores the symbolic order and imaginative structure, the meanings and values associated with house and home, the haunted houses of Ireland's 'ghost estates' and the fiscal and moral foundations of the collective household. It examines the sophisticated financial instruments derived from mortgage-backed securities that were a lynchpin of global financialization and the epicentre of the crash, the question of the fiscal and moral foundations of the collective household of Europe. A story about fundamental values and principles of fairness and justice is discussed, in particular, the contemporary conflict that reiterates the ancient Irish mythic story of the Tain. The book suggests correspondences between Plato's Republic and the Irish republic in the deformations and devolution of democracy into tyranny. It traces a red thread from the predicament of the ancient Athenians to contemporary Ireland in terms of the need to govern pleonexia, appetites without limits. The political and economic policies and practices of Irish development, the designation of Ireland's 'tax free zones', are also discussed. Finally, the ideal type of person who has been emerging under the auspices of the neoliberal revolution is imagined.

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Worklife pathways in a boom-to-bust economy
Torben Krings, Elaine Moriarty, James Wickham, Alicja Bobek, and Justyna Salamońska

Ireland by the end of our study, this was only in part linked to deteriorating labour market conditions. Many stayed, for the moment at least, and tried to adapt to work and life in ‘post-Celtic TigerIreland. What became apparent was that the recession was all but one factor in influencing the future mobility strategies of Polish migrants. Notes 1 Seven of our twenty-two participants owned properties in Poland, though none in Ireland. Interestingly, some bought these apartments with the help of their parents while living in Ireland, mainly as a personal investment for

in New mobilities in Europe
A socio-cultural critique of the Celtic Tiger and its aftermath

This book examines the phenomenon of the rise and fall of the Irish Celtic Tiger from a cultural perspective. It looks at Ireland's regression from prosperity to austerity in terms of a society as opposed to just an economy. Using literary and cultural theory, it looks at how this period was influenced by, and in its turn influenced, areas such as religion, popular culture, politics, literature, photography, gastronomy, music, theatre, poetry and film. It seeks to provide some answers as to what exactly happened to Irish society in the past few decades of boom and bust. The socio-cultural rather than the purely economic lens it uses to critique the Celtic Tiger is useful because society and culture are inevitably influenced by what happens in the economic sphere. That said, all of the measures taken in the wake of the financial crash sought to find solutions to aid the ailing economy, and the social and cultural ramifications were shamefully neglected. The aim of this book therefore is to bring the ‘Real’ of the socio-cultural consequences of the Celtic Tiger out of the darkness and to initiate a debate that is, in some respects, equally important as the numerous economic analyses of recent times. The essays analyse how culture and society are mutually-informing discourses and how this synthesis may help us to more fully understand what happened in this period, and more importantly, why it happened.

Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

catalogue, and begin the mad cycle all over. Like Wile E Coyote, the post-Celtic Tiger Irish are suspended in thin air over the abyss, clinging to the remnants of the illusion of afflu- IRELAND’S HAUNTED HOUSES 29 ence, afraid to look down, about to fall. Now falling; falling; falling. . . . It’s a long way down! How deep is the canyon? Our race to the bottom In the 1930s in the aftermath of the Wall Street Crash, anthropologist Gregory Bateson (1958, 1972) developed the concept of schismogenesis as an aetiology of social conflict. While Bateson developed the concept

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
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Torben Krings, Elaine Moriarty, James Wickham, Alicja Bobek, and Justyna Salamońska

_Introduction.indd 5 4/1/2013 9:04:28 PM 6 NEW MOBILITIES IN EUROPE was seen in a positive light as they acquired new skills and experiences and felt they became more mature and independent. However, the economic crisis and rising unemployment meant that our respondents had to re-adjust their strategies to a dramatically altered economic environment. For some, this was a factor in returning to Poland or moving on elsewhere. For others, however, it meant staying on and trying to adapt to work and life in ‘Post-Celtic TigerIreland. In the concluding chapter, we summarise the

in New mobilities in Europe
Making work pay
Sally Daly

attempts to situate the behaviour and actions of growers and workers in relation to local and global economic processes.1 It explores how uneven production within horticulture, aligned with changes to state welfare provisions following accession of the EU-12, has impacted on migrant workers and their families. The migrant workforce has made it possible for Irish growers to invest in specific cropping choices in order to maintain production in a highly competitive market. Even with post-Celtic Tiger Ireland’s rising unemployment rates, rescaling and adaptations within the

in Spacing Ireland
Margarita Estévez-Saá

Tiger Ireland where we find Irish authors giving immigrants a more predominant role. Intercultural post-Celtic Tiger Ireland: ‘Too many people’ The narratives analysed above recreate the mainly disinterested attitude of the natives towards their new, culturally different neighbours. In all cases, the Irish are still the protagonists of these multicultural novels. In this sense, Irish writers offer what can be considered as the doubly privileged view of migration, that of the occidental writer and of his/her western protagonists. After the financial collapse of the

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland
The representations of non-Irish immigrants in recent Irish crime fiction
David Clark

decade provides an important contribution to the debate on questions regarding immigration in Celtic Tiger and post-Celtic Tiger Ireland. Kilmartin, Minogue’s friend and superior, provides the voice of dissonance which repeatedly criticises the presence of non-native ‘aliens’ in the country, but Minogue himself is drawn into debate and self-questioning. Kilmartin believes that the immigrants ‘must think this is heaven here’ and that the ‘native’ Irish are ‘gobshites here, ready and willing to be led down the garden path’ (Brady, 2002: 372). As that of Minogue is

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland
Monsters of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

9 ‘What rough beast’? Monsters of post-­Celtic Tiger Ireland Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling What rough beast is coming in the wake of the death of the Celtic Tiger? Our hypothesis, formulated in the spirit of Yeats and Joyce, sees repetition and reiteration: that what will appear to us in the guise of the new is better understood in terms of recurrence.1 For Joyce and for Yeats, recurrence represents a philosophy of history, taken from the Greeks through Vico (1999) and Nietzsche (1995), attuned and oriented to the politics of the present. For Yeats (1920a

in From prosperity to austerity
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‘What rough beast?’ Monsters of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

Introduction: ‘What rough beast?’ Monsters of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland What rough beast is coming in the wake of the sudden death of the Celtic Tiger? Our hypothesis, formulated in the spirit of Yeats and Joyce, sees repetition and reiteration: that what will appear to us in the guise of the new is better understood in terms of recurrence.1 For Joyce and for Yeats recurrence represents a philosophy of history, taken from the Greeks through Vico (1999) and Nietzsche (1995), attuned and oriented to the politics of the present. For Yeats (1920a) recurrence is

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland