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If walls could talk

Northern Ireland is regarded as one of the most successful 'post conflict' societies in the world. The reimaging of Belfast as a 'post conflict' city tends to gloss over these persistent divisions. This book provides a thought provoking and comprehensive account of teenagers' perceptions and experiences of the physical and symbolic divisions that exist in 'post conflict' Belfast. Despite Northern Ireland's new status as one of the most successful examples of the resolution of what was once seen as an intractable conflict, the peace walls which separate Protestant and Catholic areas remain in place. The book examines the micro-geographies of young people and draws attention to the social practices, discourses and networks that directly or indirectly (re)shape how they make sense of and negotiate life in Belfast. It focuses is on the physical landscape enclosing interface areas and the impact that it has on the perceptions and actions of young people living in these areas. The book explores how physical divisions are perceived and experienced by young people who live in interface areas and how they view the architecture of division. It pays attention to the impact of place on teenagers' social relations within and between the localities in which they reside. The city centre of Belfast epitomises the city's status as a 'post conflict' city. A recurring argument is that identity does not exist 'out there'. The book shows how social relationships are inherently spatial and how identities are influenced by place and impact on it.

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Madeleine Leonard

Belfast as a pluralistic, cosmopolitan, modern and neutral city. Their perceptions and experiences of ‘post conflictBelfast clash with the more popular dominant discourses and hence often receive little local, national or international coverage. The purpose of this book is to visit some of these neglected communities and articulate the voices, perceptions and experiences of the young people who live and

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
The search for a place vision after the ‘troubles’
William J. V. Neill and Geraint Ellis

heritage for profit is of course unremarkable, given the current imperatives that drive the representation and promotion of place. What is remarkable in ‘post-conflict Belfast’ is that in less than a decade the city has gone from leaving the memory of Titanic ‘on a sunken plain of the psyche’, not wishing to draw much attention to its ‘ambiguous pride and embarrassment’,84 to active celebration in representing the M1426 - COULTER TEXT.qxp:GRAHAM Q7 17/7/08 08:01 Page 101 Spatial planning in contested territory 101 post-conflict city through association with one of

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
Marta Kempny

:4–5 (2014), 476–487. 5 C. Doyle and R. McAreavey, ‘Possibilities for change? Diversity in post-conflict Belfast’, City 18:4–5 (2014), 466–475. 6 Ibid. 7 Census 2011, ‘Ethnicity, identity, language and religion – economic activity by main language’, www.ninis2.nisra.gov.uk , accessed 26 January 2019. 8 E. Morawska, ‘Studying international migration in the long(er) and short(er) durée’, International Migration Institute Working Papers Series 44 (Oxford: International

in Immigrants as outsiders in the two Irelands
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Immigrants and other outsiders
Bryan Fanning and Lucy Michael

shared community resources change over a decade, offering a surprising diversion of integration pathways within the Polish group which is informed by their knowledge not only of spheres of ‘safety’, but also of what there is to become integrated into culturally. Spatial assimilation is highly evident in this exploration of Polish pathways to integration in Northern Ireland, as migrants develop independent knowledge of the host society over a decade and select the neighbourhoods, and neighbourhood cultures, of their preference. Even in the context of post-conflict

in Immigrants as outsiders in the two Irelands
Everyday life in interface areas
Madeleine Leonard

effects. As Shirlow ( 2008 : 73) points out, ‘state expenditure, in particular on the riverfront, and the use of funds to create a modern cityscape clearly benefit a middle-income group who suffered less than their working-class counterparts who bore and bear the brunt of violence and who cannot easily afford the benefits of opulent living’. In a similar vein, Murtagh ( 2008 ) argues that post-conflict Belfast is in fact becoming a

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
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Post-Troubles contexts and contradictions
Declan Long

struck by how much has changed since the late 1990s’.58 Northern Ireland, Cox suggests, ‘feels a very different place in the early part of the twenty-​first century than it did before the agreement was signed in 1998’.59 At the opening of the book Making Peace With the Past: Memory, Trauma and the Irish Troubles, Graham Dawson offers his own observations on the ‘different place’ that the city of Belfast in particular has become: Since the paramilitary ceasefires of 1994, the centre of ‘post-​conflictBelfast, between the City Hall and the River Lagan, has been a site

in Ghost-haunted land
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‘Northern Irish art’ in the wider world
Declan Long

’ tours now offered in post-​conflict Belfast. These works will be returned to in Chapter 4, but it is useful to note at this stage that the title of the latter video, Dogs Have No Religion (deriving from fact that during the troubles, a greyhound track in Belfast became one place where sectarian tensions were understood to be irrelevant) was borrowed to name another group representation of Northern Ireland’s contemporary artists, shown at the Czech Museum of Fine Arts in Prague during the summer of 2006. This exhibition also made a case for correcting a distorted view

in Ghost-haunted land
Declan Long

a way as to make subtle connections with the formal rigour of abstract modernism, while subverting the aspirations of such art by simultaneously evoking the desolation of urban environments. Breuer’s work might, perhaps, be seen to have closer affinity with the practice of John Duncan, the younger Northern Irish photographer whose downbeat and detached Becher-​inspired, cataloguing of post-​conflict Belfast, we have touched on already. For, like Duncan, Breuer maintains a commitment to presenting his subjects against ‘neutral’ grey skies, a policy that obviously

in Ghost-haunted land
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Chris Gilligan

2007; 190 Northern Ireland and the crisis of anti-racism ‘Church cash helps deported Nigerian family in hiding’, Belfast Telegraph, 23 April 2008. 40 Carey Doyle and Ruth McAreavey, ‘Possibilities for change? Diversity in postconflict Belfast’, City 18.4–5 (2014): 466–475; Trademark, Racism and racist attitudes in Northern Ireland; Neil Jarman, Overview analysis of racist incidents recorded in Northern Ireland by the RUC 1996–1999 (Belfast: OFMDFM, 2002). 41 Independent Monitoring Commission, Third report of the Independent Monitoring Commission (London

in Northern Ireland and the crisis of anti-racism