Search results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • "pre-emptive military action" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All

This book is the collective use of force within the framework of the Charter, whose ambitious project is based on the premise that armed force can be resorted to exclusively in the common interest. It begins with a short discussion of the powers granted to the Security Council for the discharge of its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, and the conditions under which these powers may be exercised. The United States, supported by its NATO allies, or at least some of them, openly challenged the authority of the Security Council and attempted to downgrade its authorisation from a legal requirement to a matter of political convenience. The book deals with the use of force by States either individually or jointly. Through the lenses of the interaction between the Charter and customary international law, it considers the evolution of the right to self-defence, the only exception expressly provided for in the Charter, and the possible re-emergence of other exceptions. The book focuses in particular on the controversial question concerning the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons in self-defence and of the pre-emptive military action against threats posed by these weapons. Often referring to the recent Iraqi crisis, it further deals with the collective and unilateral means at the disposal of the United Nations and its members to enforce disarmament obligations and tackle the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

Jack Holland

‘grey zone’ between being on the right side of the law and doing what is necessary. In its third section, therefore, this chapter considers the implications of fictional television’s portrayal of torture during the era of the War on Terror. It argues that such portrayals matter – they influence us, just as they influence the decisions of a Supreme Court Justice – and, frequently, they have been problematic. Finally, in its fourth section, the chapter turns to consider a related and similarly contentious issue: the need for pre-emptive military action to counter

in Fictional television and American Politics
Abstract only
Tarcisio Gazzini

-defence and of the pre-emptive military action against threats posed by these weapons. Often referring to the recent Iraqi crisis, it further deals with the collective and unilateral means at the disposal of the United Nations and its members to enforce disarmament obligations and tackle the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. 1 See A. Cassese, ‘Terrorism is also

in The changing rules on the use of force in international law
From Afghanistan to Iraq
Kerry Longhurst

document was not new, since it referred to the importance of international law, multilateralism and the variety of ‘soft’ power tools already available to the union. What was innovative about the document was an articulation of the need, in extraordinary cases, for pre-emptive military action.34 Unsurprisingly, it was this particular dimension of the draft paper that the Germans sought to water down. An issue that had been gaining in clarity since 1999, though one which was brought into sharper relief by the war in Iraq, concerned the deficiencies in the Bundeswehr’s post

in Germany and the use of force
Rhiannon Vickers

argued that Iraq could provide such groups with weapons of mass destruction (WMD). On 20 March 2003, having failed to gain UN support, the US launched pre-emptive military action against Iraq, not just to disarm its supposed WMD, but in order to secure regime change through the ousting of Saddam Hussein. This was part of Bush’s rationale of taking the war to the enemy, arguing that America must ‘confront the worst threats before they emerge’, and that ‘our best defense is a good offense’.14 Britain contributed 46,000 troops to Operation Iraqi Freedom, joining

in The Labour Party and the world
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

power of the ‘war on terrorism’ frame was such that it legitimised pre-emptive military action against Iraq in 2003, despite the absence of evidence linking Iraq with the 11 September attacks. This argument is made with the benefit of hindsight, however, and may not necessarily describe how events were understood at the time. As noted above, some critics have suggested that the idea of a ‘clash of

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Daniel Lea

builds Jackie’s mystique into near inviolable heroism, making the gradual collapse into mania and paranoia that she seems to undergo in the final third all the more dramatic. Jackie maintains and trains an army of elite warriors whose role is initially unclear but who become increasingly dominant within the community as Jackie develops the belief that Carhullan is to be dissolved by the Authority, and pre-emptive military action is thus required. Filtered through the uncritical eyes of Sister, the division of the community into factions in favour of and against

in Twenty-first-century fiction
Tarcisio Gazzini

. Still from the standpoint of self-defence, it then focuses on one of the most remarkable issues of the recent Iraqi crisis, namely the admissibility of pre-emptive military action against potential threats posed by the development of weapons of mass destruction. Finally, it considers collective and unilateral measures taken in order to ensure compliance with disarmament

in The changing rules on the use of force in international law