Abstract only
Responses to clerical support for republicanism
Brian Heffernan

6 Troublesome priests: responses to clerical support for republicanism Unlike condemnation of republican violence, support for the IRA took place as far away from the limelight as possible. Nevertheless republican priests had to account for themselves often enough, to their bishop or religious superior for example, or, if they were curates, to their parish priest. This was also true for priests who supported Sinn Féin. The current chapter examines the interaction between these priests and their social surroundings, ecclesiastical and lay. Bishops, religious

in Freedom and the Fifth Commandment
Cara Delay

6 Women, priests, and power From January 1879 through December 1880, Edward McCabe, the Catholic archbishop of Dublin, received eighty-three letters written by lay Catholic women.1 In their letters, Dublin’s Catholic women wrote of poverty, family, and politics. They requested McCabe’s assistance with making ends meet and mediating neighbourly conflicts. Many sought their archbishop’s help in negotiating their relationships with their priests.2 These women also, however, asserted their own wishes and desires, declaring that they were in fact central actors in the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Support for Sinn Féin, the Dáil and local IRA units
Brian Heffernan

4 Sinn Féin priests: support for Sinn Féin, the Dáil and local IRA units As Part I of this book has shown, a section of the clergy retained its support for the Irish Parliamentary Party even after the major political transformation that followed the Easter rising. But many priests did what the majority of the lay population did, and changed their allegiance to Sinn Féin. Ó Fiaich has plausibly argued that this change was most striking among a new generation of priests trained at Maynooth in the years during which the Gaelic revival was promoted there by such

in Freedom and the Fifth Commandment
Abstract only
British measures against the clergy
Brian Heffernan

7 Priest and victim: British measures against the clergy While there were abundant grounds for condemning the British campaign in Ireland after the escalation of violence in mid-­1920, Catholic priests nonetheless had some specific reasons of their own for doing so. The old RIC’s traditional rapport with the parish clergy became increasingly strained as normal relations between the constabulary and society broke down. Moreover, the newly arrived Black and Tans and Auxiliaries had none of their Irish colleagues’ lingering inhibitions with regard to the way

in Freedom and the Fifth Commandment
Charles West

Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims wrote voluminously about the parish and its priest during his long episcopacy (845–82). Author of a treatise dedicated to the status of rural churches, the Collectio de ecclesiis et capellis , Hincmar also issued several sets of instructions traditionally labelled ‘episcopal capitularies’ or ‘statutes’ to rural priests in his diocese, became involved in fierce controversies over particular churches and touched on related issues in many other texts. His interest in the topic represents an important part of

in Hincmar of Rheims
The case of Trising in context
Mayke de Jong

Trising returns from Rome In the autumn of 871, Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims sent a long and indignant letter to Pope Hadrian II, defending himself against the accusations of his nephew, Bishop Hincmar of Laon. Almost as an afterthought, he added a report on a delinquent and violent priest named Trising. 1 Well over two years previously, Trising had failed to appear in front of a synod to account for himself; instead, without Hincmar being aware of it, he had gone off to Rome to take his case to the pope. Now

in Hincmar of Rheims
St John Rivers and the language of war
Karen Turner

• 9 • Charlotte Brontë’s ‘warrior priest’: St John Rivers and the language of war Karen Turner In July 1855, the Reverend Patrick Brontë wrote to Elizabeth Gaskell about his children’s early fascination with all things military. He particularly noted his daughter Charlotte’s fascination with her ‘hero’, the Duke of Wellington, recalling that the children would engage in heated arguments about the relative merits of Wellington, Bonaparte, Hannibal and Caesar and that he would frequently be called in to arbitrate.1 Charlotte Brontë’s interest in the ‘Iron Duke

in Martial masculinities
Susana Onega

chap 1.qxd 2/2/06 1:57 pm Page 17 1 Of priests and prophets Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit was published as a paperback by Pandora Press in 1985. As Jeanette Winterson notes in the Introduction to the Vintage edition of the novel, she wrote it ‘on a £25 office Goliath with an industrial quantity of Tipex’, ‘during the winter of 1983 and the spring of 1984’, at a time when ‘I was unhappy in London, didn’t want to be in advertising or banking like most of my Oxford contemporaries, couldn’t bring myself to hold down any job that hinted of routine hours’.1

in Jeanette Winterson
Abstract only
Deborah G. Christie, Emma Liggins, Shellie McMurdo, Hannah Priest and Jillian Wingfield

Gothic Studies
Angela P. Thomas

5 A review of the monuments of Unnefer, High Priest of Osiris at Abydos in the reign of Ramesses II Angela P. Thomas Unnefer was the High Priest or First Prophet of Osiris at Abydos for a substantial part of the long reign of Ramesses II, and was the fourth member of a family who held this office. An ancestor, To, served in the reign of Horemheb and possibly that of Ramesses I; he was followed by Hat, his brother-in-law, in the reign of Sety I, and then Hat’s son Mery continued in the post into the reign of Ramesses II and was succeeded by his own son, Unnefer

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt