Editors: Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

There has been increasing interest and debate in recent years on the instituted nature of economic processes in general and the related ideas of the market and the competitive process in particular. This debate lies at the interface between two largely independent disciplines, economics and sociology, and reflects an attempt to bring the two fields of discourse more closely together. This book explores this interface in a number of ways, looking at the competitive process and market relations from a number of different perspectives. It considers the social role of economic institutions in society and examines the various meanings embedded in the word 'markets', as well as developing arguments on the nature of competition as an instituted economic process. The close of the twentieth century saw a virtual canonisation of markets as the best, indeed the only really effective, way to govern an economic system. The market organisation being canonised was simple and pure, along the lines of the standard textbook model in economics. The book discusses the concepts of polysemy , idealism, cognition, materiality and cultural economy. Michael Best provides an account of regional economic adaptation to changed market circumstances. This is the story of the dynamics of capitalism focused on the resurgence of the Route 128 region around Boston following its decline in the mid-1980s in the face of competition from Silicon Valley. The book also addresses the question of how this resurgence was achieved.

This book examines the changing role of victims of crime in the Irish criminal process. It documents the variety of ways in which victims of crime are now being written into the criminal process discourse and practice in Ireland, while taking account of existing challenges. The book seeks to show how the justice system is emerging from hegemonic dominance and examines the conditions which have made their re-emergence possible and the commitments, practices and strategic priorities shaping this inclusionary momentum. It demonstrates how the paradigm of prosecuting and investigating crime moved from an intensely local, unstructured and victim-precipitated arrangement to a structured, adversarial, state-monopolised event where the accused was largely silenced and the victim was rendered invisible. The book documents the black-letter, technocratic details of how victims have been juridically provided for since the late 1980s in Ireland. It then focuses on service rights which complement the legal rights which victims of crime have been afforded in Ireland. The book also charts the challenges which continue to face service users, providers and the wider criminal justice sector in the delivery of services which are responsive to the needs of victims and meet increased demands under the EU Directive on Victims' Rights. Innovative policy options adopted in other jurisdictions, including the creation of an Ombudsman for Victims of Crime and measures to unify service provision within the sector, including Witness Care Units, are also explored.

Mark Harvey

4 Competition as instituted economic process Mark Harvey Introduction A challenge to the new economic sociology is that central economic processes should become the focus of theoretical and empirical sociological analysis. This chapter makes some steps towards analysing competition in that light, partly because competition is often assumed to be the market force of all market forces. The central argument made is both that competition processes are co-instituted with markets (including end markets), and that market processes are in turn co-instituted with

in Market relations and the competitive process
Abstract only
Shane Kilcommins, Susan Leahy, Kathleen Moore Walsh and Eimear Spain

This book will examine the changing role of victims of crime in the Irish criminal process. Their status has not remained static over time. Rather, it has been subject to a series of ruptures which have dramatically altered their standing. Under the pre-modern exculpatory justice system which existed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, where wrongdoing was understood as a personal altercation, victims were given primacy as decision makers: they could elect to leave matters rest; settle privately; or prosecute, but decide upon the charge. They were, in

in The victim in the Irish criminal process
Open Access (free)
Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

1 Introduction Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde There has been increasing interest and debate in recent years on the instituted nature of economic processes in general and the related ideas of the market and the competitive process in particular. This debate lies at the interface between two largely independent disciplines, economics and sociology, and reflects an attempt to bring the two fields of discourse more closely together. In many ways this is to return to a previous age when the study of institutional arrangements was at the centre of the study of

in Market relations and the competitive process
Shane Kilcommins, Susan Leahy, Kathleen Moore Walsh and Eimear Spain

The previous chapter detailed the legal rights which victims of crime have been afforded in Ireland. This chapter focuses on service rights which complement these legal rights. Service rights ‘refer to services which do not affect procedure, such as information provided about case progress’ (Hoyle, 2012 : 407). These rights are representative of the ‘welfare model’ of victims’ rights protection (Rogan, 2006a ). Since the provision of services to victims does not interfere with criminal procedure or potentially affect defendants’ due process rights, service

in The victim in the Irish criminal process
Don Slater

5 Markets, materiality and the ‘new economy’ Don Slater Introduction The contemporary ‘cultural turn’ in thinking about economic processes has been deeply bound up with narratives of ‘dematerialisation’. We might start from Veblenesque stories of status symbols, and proceed through semiotic stories of ideologies and codes, through tales of post-industrial societies and service economies, through post-Fordist segmentation and lifestyling and finally on to knowledge, information or ‘weightless’ economies, ‘new economies’, global brands and digital commodities

in Market relations and the competitive process
Open Access (free)
Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

9 Conclusion Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde In conclusion we draw together and evaluate a number of the themes raised in this volume and begin to sketch an agenda for future research about markets and the competitive process. Happily, this book resides within a now-flourishing broader stream of ideas at the interface between economics and sociology. Some of this new work signals the resurrection of economic sociology, while other aspects of it emanate from within the literature on innovation processes and, more generally, from evolutionary economics. There has

in Market relations and the competitive process
Constituting the cultural economy
Fran Tonkiss

6 Between markets, firms and networks: constituting the cultural economy Fran Tonkiss Introduction Cultural and creative sectors have come to represent key areas of growth within a number of regional and national economies, and figure prominently within arguments regarding the increasingly ‘cultural’ character of economic processes and the restructuring of market forms. An emergent cultural economy is also of critical interest for institutional analysis, and for a number of reasons. Firstly, such an analysis addresses very clearly the need to take culture

in Market relations and the competitive process
Open Access (free)
Brian J. Loasby

firms may benefit from market relationships. I begin by identifying some basic elements of human cognition to provide a credible psychological basis for economic reasoning. Cognition and the growth of knowledge The principle of biological evolution is genetic selection for features which contribute to inclusive fitness. These features include both physical and behavioural characteristics in a sorting process which necessarily extends over very many generations. The standard biological model therefore assumes a stable selection environment, and implies the possibility

in Market relations and the competitive process