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In a long and varied career, Lindsay Anderson made training films, documentaries, searing family dramas and blistering satires, including This Sporting Life, O Lucky Man! and Britannia Hospital. This book is about a director whose work came to public attention with Free Cinema but who, unlike many of his peers in that movement did not take the Hollywood route to success. What emerges is a strong feeling for the character of the man as well as for a remarkable career in British cinema. Making use of hitherto unseen original materials from Anderson's extensive personal and professional records, this book is valuable as a study of how the films came about: the production problems involved, the collaborative input of others, as well as the completed films' promotion and reception. It also offers a finely argued take on the whole issue of film authorship. It prompts renewed respect for the man and the artist and a desire to watch the films all over again.

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An industry in decline
Brenda M. King

commercial potential of Indian silk yarn as the English silk industry needed raw material for its weavers. The company, therefore, sought to address some of the production problems in India and experts were sent out to the sub-continent to improve matters. Different methods of mulberry cultivation, silkworm rearing and comparative methods of reeling were tried, and by the first half

in Silk and empire
Abstract only
Brenda M. King

manufacturers increasingly imported their raw materials from India, once production problems had been overcome. Although stimulated by collections of India’s silk textiles and their role in English silk manufacturing, this publication does not pretend to be an exhaustive record of either country’s silk industry. It restricts itself to an analysis of those

in Silk and empire
Brenda M. King

respect. The Indian silk industry was experiencing huge production problems, however, and the number of workers employed was severely reduced. Indian silk goods were often manufactured from raw silks imported from Afghanistan, Bokhara, Burma and China. In the latter half of the nineteenth century India looked to England for solutions to remedy its declining silk industry. A

in Silk and empire
Clive Barker’s Halloween Horror Nights and brand authorship
Gareth James

for the screen by the same producers. However, while Underworld 's original screenplay pitched gangsters against monsters in a lurid, violent world, the final filmed result was a low-budget mess. Rawhead Rex also suffered production problems, with the original short story twisted into a confused monster film that, like Underworld , Barker was quick to distance himself

in Clive Barker
Alastair J. Reid

production problem was the drinking habits of boilermakers, especially the riveters. But while their physically strenuous work did encourage heavy drinking, to focus on this would be to miss the point, for staying away from work on a Monday not only increased leisure time, but also protected established piece rates and pushed a lot of work in busy periods into the better-paid overtime bracket.33 If the bad time-keeping habits of shipbuilding’s piece workers were immune to all calls for sobriety and respectability, it was because they were really due to the employers

in The tide of democracy
Andrew Taylor

by ministers on defence, rearmament and production problems. Unenthusiastic about this proposal, ministers concluded that the difficulties were insuperable and employers could not be excluded, ‘in which case we should be landed with the tripartite arrangement which … is not to be desired’. Tripartism ‘would enable either or both parties … to get out of their responsibilities and place them upon the

in What about the workers?
Simon Grennan

and technical environment was a primary cause and motivation of her work. This context directs attention towards both the conventional as well as the unconventional aspects of her role in the business and of her drawings. As such, I only need to outline the particular ‘team production problem’ posed in organising a printing business, in order to seek Duval's place within it (Alchian and Demsetz 1972 ). 1 For the purpose of this chapter, it is enough to provide a syncretic

in Marie Duval
Peter D.G. Thomas

, genuine or otherwise, in order to put a point of view. A standard print-run for a pamphlet was 500, but the sale of popular pamphlets would rise to many more. That of Israel Mauduit’s Considerations on the Present German War in 1760, probably the most influential pamphlet of the period, was 5,750 copies, significantly more than the 3,250 of Edmund Burke’s more famous 1770 treatise on party, Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontent.53 The influence of pamphlets was far greater than their circulation, limited by production problems and price, would suggest; for

in George III
Alastair J. Reid

employers over the relative merits of hand and pneumatic work, in terms of both the quality and the cost of production.57 The more detailed evidence available on national bargaining and local work practices in the case of pneumatic riveting thus confirms the main themes indicated in the discussion of the introduction of hydraulic power in the 1880s. Once again the new technology did not live up to initial expectations, as it turned out to be less easily adaptable to practical production problems than had been anticipated. The action of pneumatic tools was too light to

in The tide of democracy