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Strategies for global change

This book analyses the evolving Anglo-American counter-terror propaganda strategies that spanned the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as reconstruction, between 2001 and 2008. It offers insights into the transformation beyond this period, tracking many key developments as much as possible up to the time of writing (2013) and providing a retrospective on the 'war on terror'. Using empirical data located within multiple spheres, the book draws on sociology, political science and international relations, developing an interdisciplinary analysis of political communication in the international system. It shows how media technologies presented legal, structural and cultural problems for what were seen as rigid propaganda systems defined by their emergence in an old media system of sovereign states with stable target audiences. Propaganda successes and advances were an inconsistent by-product both of malfunction and of relationships, cultures and rivalries, both domestically and between the partners. The differing social relations of planners and propagandists to wider society create tensions within the 'machine', however leaders may want it to function. The book demonstrates that the 'messy' nature of bureaucracy and international systems as well as the increasingly fluid media environment are all important in shaping what actually happens. In a context of initial failures in formal coordination, the book stresses the importance of informal relationships to planners in the propaganda war. This situated Britain in an important yet precarious position within the Anglo-American propaganda effort, particularly in Iraq.

Emma Louise Briant

4 Domestic planners, initiative and propaganda Introduction This chapter will show how practical propaganda functions were maintained despite the failings of formal structures described above. British and US propaganda function continued of course, and inconsistent responses brought adaptation despite organisational problems. This chapter extends the analysis, begun in the last, of the domestic propaganda strategy of each country and develops a thematic argument, highlighting trends that were crucial to propaganda policy-making within the countries. It shows

in Propaganda and counter-terrorism
Abstract only
Naomi Paxton

This chapter examines the participation of the Actresses' Franchise League in large immersive indoor suffrage exhibitions, fairs and bazaars, introducing their work within the context of the performative propaganda strategies of the wider suffrage movement and its interventions in public visually oriented space. Beginning with a particular focus on the Women’s Social and Political Union Women’s Exhibition of 1909, this chapter considers representations of women and womanhood in suffrage plays and entertainments and how theatre and performance were used to explore issues of violence, imprisonment and activism.

in Stage Rights!
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Abstract only
Emma Louise Briant

during this transitional period, the book will point to the active mediation of propaganda strategies into the culture and practices of government departments and military organisations. Where the operation and systems of propaganda are often discussed as if they were a systematic or unproblematic ‘machine’, this book demonstrates that the systems of this machine do not always function as governments hope and, like any large bureaucracy, they can struggle to adapt. They are of course formed of people, and propaganda planning can become a site of active struggle

in Propaganda and counter-terrorism
John Corner

elite theory, complicates our sense of the ethics of political communication at work in these classical texts. Aristotle’s On Rhetoric is offered as an analytic guide POLITICS, PROMOTIONAL CULTURE AND ‘PROPAGANDA’ 129 to successful persuasion, of course, and Rawnsley notes the way in which passages like the following presage later propaganda strategies: [t]he rule of good taste is, that your style be lowered or raised according to the subject. On which account we must escape observation in doing this, and not appear to speak in a studied manner, but naturally, for

in Theorising Media
Emma Louise Briant

7 Countering terror, denying dissent Given the dramatic period of adaptation that followed 9/11, it’s important to reflect on the changes in propaganda and deconstruct the role played by the Anglo-American relationship, with a view to bringing wider discussion in academia, policy and wider society. This book has examined the extent and manner in which Anglo-American relations shaped the direction of propaganda strategy, within the wider ‘counter-terrorism’ adaptation of both countries. It showed how the domestic structures of each country’s bureaucracy, its

in Propaganda and counter-terrorism
Abstract only
Re-evaluating the AFL
Naomi Paxton

to 1958. This introduction reviews material published by and about the League that has shaped the presence of the organisation in existing histories of feminist theatre, political theatre and the suffrage movement. The first chapter, ‘Exhibition’, looks at the participation of the League in large indoor suffrage exhibitions, fairs and bazaars between 1908 and 1914, introducing their work within the context of the performative propaganda strategies of the suffrage movement and its interventions in public visually oriented space. Here I consider the representations

in Stage Rights!
Neil Macmaster

captured document, were ecstatic at this proof of the success of their emancipation strategy and increased its determination to widen the activity of the EMSI.96 The Bureau in March 1959 circulated extracts from the directive to encourage all the EMSI teams through this evidence of their success.97 Some of this optimism was warranted since by late 1958 the FLN faced very real difficulty in implementing its own counter-propaganda strategy. The huge, ‘steam-roller’ offensive of the Challe Plan, combined with the impact of the high-voltage defences along the Tunisian and

in Burning the veil
Patagonia as a land of broken Welsh promise
Trevor Harris

’ marked by ‘misfortunes’, ‘mishaps’ and ‘accidents’, as well as ‘defective arrangements made by the settlers themselves’. But whether induced by the facts, by a sense of genuine nostalgia for the adventure which he had now left behind, or – as seems more likely – by the need to develop a propaganda strategy to recruit readers as new emigrants to the colony, Humphreys’ account

in Imperial expectations and realities