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The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture
Alison Landsberg

called ‘prosthetic memory’. 3 In 1913, Max Scheler published The Nature of Sympathy , in which he attempts to explore the contours of sympathy, empathy and what he regards most highly of all, ‘fellow-feeling’. 4 Fellow-feeling, a sense of collective responsibility, is to Scheler a position of high moral value, which he defines in opposition to ‘emotional infection’ and

in Memory and popular film
Author: Sarah Wright

In the full-length treatment of the child in Spanish cinema, this book explores the ways that the cinematic child comes to represent 'prosthetic memory'. The cinematic children in the book retain traces of their mechanical origins: thus they are dolls, ventriloquists' dummies, cyborgs or automata. Moreover, by developing the monstrous undertones evoked by these mechanical traces (cinema such as 'Frankensteinian dream'), these films, in different ways, return repeatedly to a central motif. The central motif is the child's confrontation with a monster and, derivatively, the theme of the monstrous child. Through their obsessive recreation over time, the themes of the child and the monster and the monstrous child come to stand in metonymically for the confrontation of the self with the horrors of Spain's recent past. The book focuses on the cine religioso (religious cinema), in particular, Marcelino, pan y vino. The children of cine religioso appear like automata, programmed to love unconditionally an absent mother. The book then examines the Marisol's films from the 1960s and the way she was groomed by her creators to respond and engineer the economic and cultural changes of the consumerist Spain of the 1960s. It further deals with Victor Erice's El espiritu de la colmena and works through cinematic memories of this film in later works such as El laberinto del fauno, El orfanato and El espinazo del diablo. The films are seen to gesture towards the imaginary creation of a missing child.

Robert Burgoyne

, film is now, to a greater extent than before, associated with the body; it engages the viewer at the somatic level, immersing the spectator in experiences and impressions that, like memories, seem to be burned in. I will begin by summarising an important argument that has been made by Alison Landsberg, who has coined the striking term ‘prosthetic memory’ to describe the way mass cultural

in Memory and popular film
Sarah Wright

­ ontextualisations by critics, scholars or the film’s creators (the Criterion DVD provides a passionate reconstruction of the making of the film and reflections on its meaning) who locate its dramas and enigmas within the post-war setting? What does it mean to argue that these prosthetic memories, films which reconstruct the past to simulate first-hand experiences, might have a role to play in Spain’s ‘memory wars’? As Pam Cook has noted, prosthetic memories are laid open to: charges of lack of authenticity, of substituting a degraded popular version for the ‘real’ event, and to

in The child in Spanish cinema
Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Abstract only
Sarah Wright

capacity for fakery. In terms of the capturing of the Spanish past on screen, the cinematic child can be a powerful tool for the exploration of the recovery of memories even as it may usher in anxieties regarding the possible inauthenticity of these memories. Prosthetic memories created by cinema can be open to accusations of the implantation of images of the past that are nostalgic, inauthentic or ideologically slanted. Elsaesser calls these images ‘traumatised’ and sees them as inherently postmodern: these are the event without a trace (Elsaesser, 2001). Writing

in The child in Spanish cinema
Abstract only
Sarah Wright

’s relationship with this child, Eva, bears witness, constructions of the child or the child’s experience are so often ‘a form of anthropomorphism’ (Lury, 2010: 109) in the sense that they reveal adult investments in the child. In the film’s final twist, it will be revealed that Eva is also a robot, having been created by David (Álex’s brother) and Lana (his former lover) after Álex left town. Eva overhears a conversation which reveals to her the truth of her mechanical origins – she had no knowledge of this, it had been omitted from her implanted, ‘prosthetic memory

in The child in Spanish cinema
Memory and identity in Cold War America
Brian Etheridge

sense of place or ancestry’, George Lipsitz argues, ‘consumers of electronic mass media can experience a common heritage with a people they have never seen; they can acquire memories of a past to which they have no geographical or biological connection.’ Alison Landsberg calls these ‘prosthetic memories’. In an age of mass culture, she writes, ‘memories of the Holocaust do not belong only to Jews, nor do memories of slavery belong solely to African Americans’. 3 In this exploration of images of Germany in the US, I found that conceiving of collective memory as

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf
John Storey

. 22 In an argument similar to Halbwachs’, Alison Landsberg has coined the term ‘prosthetic memory’ to describe the ways in which mass media (especially cinema) enable people to experience as memories what they did not themselves live. As she explains, Because the mass media fundamentally

in Memory and popular film
Russell J. A. Kilbourn

recounted and into the time of culture’ (Sebald and Tripp 2005: 90). For Sebald, in short, the ‘unrecounted’ only awaits recounting – although this may bring neither closure nor redemption.36 And, in this view, adaptation or remediation can be seen as a vital contemporary modality of prosthetic memory: ‘Remembrance . . . is nothing other than a quotation.’ In Sebald, memory never avoids an acute self-awareness of its own limitations; not least those produced by modern memory’s irreducible reliance upon pre-existing cultural forms and technologies of meaning production

in A literature of restitution