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Author: Bryan Fanning

In the last decade Irish society has visibly changed with the emergence of new immigrant communities of black and ethnic minorities. This book draws upon a number of academic disciplines, focusing on the relationship between ideological forms of racism and its consequences upon black and ethnic minorities. Media and political debates on racism in Ireland during this period have tended to depict it as a new phenomenon and even as one imported by asylum seekers. Ireland was never immune from the racist ideologies that governed relationships between the west and the rest despite a history of colonial anti-Irish racism. Citizenship reproduced inequalities between nationals on the basis of gender and race and ethnicity. The book explores how the processes of nation-building which shaped contemporary Irish society and the Irish state were accompanied by a politics of national identity within which claims of social membership of various minority groups were discounted. It examines the exclusionary and assimilationist consequences of Irish nationbuilding for Protestant, Jewish and Traveller minority communities. The book also considers anti-Semitism in Irish society from independence in 1922 until the 1950s. It examines how contemporary responses to refugees and asylum seekers have been shaped by a legacy of exclusionary state practices. Finally, the book talks about anti-Traveller racism, the politics of Traveller exclusion, the work of SPIARSI, and the efforts to contest racism and discrimination faced by minorities in Ireland as expressions of multiculturalism.

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Bryan Fanning

Social Change in the Republic of Ireland, locates racism in Irish society within a historical context. It is argued in Chapter 2 that Ireland was never immune from the racist ideologies that governed relationships between the west and the rest, despite a history of colonial anti-Irish racism. The title of the book also alludes to social change resulting from recent immigration. To some extent the politicisation of asylum issues in Ireland has mirrored responses throughout ‘Fortress Europe’ and in other western countries. Newspaper headlines during 1997 depicted Ireland

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
Satnam Virdee

Worley, Against the grain.indd 218 03/06/2014 16:01:12 Anti-racism and the socialist left, 1968–79 219 The Grunwick strike A further politically potent response emanating from socialist activists was the effective mobilisation of the working class and trade unions in support of racialised minority workers striking against racism and poor working conditions. The most visible manifestation of such working-class solidarity and the rejection of racist ideologies took place between 1976 and 1978 during the Grunwick dispute. 53 Grunwick Film Processing Laboratories was a

in Against the grain
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Anandi Ramamurthy

interests. In this way they were involved in the construction and manipulation of racist ideologies. In the late twentieth century the representations of inequality and racism in advertising and culture were frequently less overt, although the changing political and economic climate in Europe and America may lead to this changing in the twenty-first century. Even the images that appear to represent global

in Imperial persuaders
Anandi Ramamurthy

of Europe in relation to the non-European world. The fourth section, ‘State Advertising’, tried to draw a sense of relationship between capital and the state, through the state’s use of similar racist ideologies. The final section, ‘The Black Consumer’, raised questions about black people’s reception of advertisements directed at a predominantly white audience. 3 While

in Imperial persuaders
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Helen Boak

jobs. It was, however, to be the Nazis’ racist ideology which was to have the most impact on women’s lives, with those deemed racially inferior or of little value to the Aryan race, including those with hereditary illnesses, asocials, the Jews, and the gypsies, facing discrimination and exclusion from the national, racial community. Notes 1 E. Weitz, ‘Weimar Germany and the Dilemmas of Liberty’, in J. C. Friedman (ed.), The Routledge History of the Holocaust (London: Routledge, 2010), p. 59. 2 An exception was to be women who lost

in Women in the Weimar Republic
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Bryan Fanning

racist ideologies of ‘white’ western superiority as well as other racisms which held the Irish to be inferior. According to Holmes, Ireland acquired an ‘unwelcome heritage’ of colonialism that sits ill at ease with its reputation as a country that struggled against colonialism.24 Colonialism and Irish identity McVeigh notes that Philip Sheridan, an Irish emigrant to the USA who rose to be commander in chief of the American army, coined and lived by the phrase that ‘the only good injun is a dead one’.25 The genocide of Native Americans found ongoing ideological

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
Bryce Lease

unrecognized. The privilege of mimesis is thus unintentionally arrogated to the European body, even if the production efficiently stages national fantasies of otherness embodied by Africa and the African native. In conceiving whether an anti-naturalist staging escapes racist ideologies, it is enough to consider how Europe’s white dress does not perform whiteness under the 182 After ’89 same conditions that the white actor’s painted body as Africa performs blackness. This equivalency is undermined by the direct relationship that prevails between a symbolic practice and its

in After ’89
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Jokes, racism and Black and Asian voices in British comedy television
Gavin Schaffer

against the practice from black Londoners. See ITA Archive, File 3995803, David Pitt to the Director General of the BBC, 16 May 1967. 20 ‘Peace and Goodwill’, Till Death Us Do Part, BBC, 26 December 1966. Television. 21 ‘Alf’s Dilemma’, Till Death Us Do Part, BBC, 27 February 1967. Television. 22 ‘TV Licence’, Till Death Us Do Part, BBC, 2 January 1974. Television. 23 See Malik, Representing Black Britain, p. 97; Husband, Charles, ‘Racist Humour and Racist Ideology in British Television: Or I Laughed till You Cried’, in George Paton and Chris Powell (eds), Humour in

in Adjusting the contrast
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Immigrants and other outsiders
Bryan Fanning and Lucy Michael

other social and political processes to produce distinct forms of ‘racialised’ inequality. 13 The concept of racialisation describes the ways in which racist ideologies and beliefs function as a mechanism for demarcating defined groups, such as ethnic minorities, in ways that legitimise their marginalisation or social exclusion. 14 Racism, then, is an imprecise term often loosely used to describe a collection of inter-related prejudices, beliefs and ideologies which assume the biological or cultural inferiority of distinct groups. Racism can be broadly defined as

in Immigrants as outsiders in the two Irelands