Critical encounters between state and world

Recognition and Global Politics examines the potential and limitations of the discourse of recognition as a strategy for reframing justice and injustice within contemporary world affairs. Drawing on resources from social and political theory and international relations theory, as well as feminist theory, postcolonial studies and social psychology, this ambitious collection explores a range of political struggles, social movements and sites of opposition that have shaped certain practices and informed contentious debates in the language of recognition.

The case of Iran–US relations

This book addresses a critical issue in global politics: how recognition and misrecognition fuel conflict or initiate reconciliation. The main objective of this book is to demonstrate how representations of one state by another influence foreign policymaking behaviour. The key argument is that representations are important because they shape both the identity of a state and how it is recognised by others. States respond to representations of themselves that do not fit with how they wish to be recognised. The book provides a thorough conceptual engagement with the issues at stake and a detailed empirical investigation of the fraught bilateral relations between the United States and Iran, which is perhaps one of the most significant flashpoints in global politics today. Despite Iran and the US finally reaching an agreement on the nuclear issue that allows Iran limited nuclear technological capacity in exchange for the lifting of certain sanctions, the US withdrew from the deal in May 2018. However, questions remain about how best to explain the initial success of this deal considering the decades of animosity between Iran and the US, which have previously scuppered any attempts on both sides to reach an amicable agreement. Increasing concerns about declining Iran–US relations under the Trump administration suggest even more so the power of recognition and misrecognition in world politics. Scholars and strategists alike have struggled to answer the question of how this deal was made possible, which this book addresses.

Tarik Kochi

5 Recognition and Accumulation Tarik Kochi Introduction The latter years of the twentieth century saw the emergence of a number of very interesting reinterpretations of G.W.F. Hegel's moral and political philosophy in which the concept of ‘recognition’ ( Anerkennung ) was given pride of place

in Recognition and Global Politics
Meanings, Limits, Manifestations
Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick

1 Recognition and the International: Meanings, Limits, Manifestations Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick Over the past two decades, critical debates and insights within philosophy, sociology and political theory have focused on the concept of recognition. From interpersonal relationships of self and other, to multiculturalism, identity

in Recognition and Global Politics
Greta Fowler Snyder

10 Recognition in the Struggle against Global Injustice Greta Fowler Snyder Introduction State-specific solutions are necessarily inadequate to the task of effectively addressing the many global issues that humans face today – environmental damage, the ravages of neo-liberalism, violence against

in Recognition and Global Politics
Emilian Kavalski and Magdalena Zolkos

8 The Recognition of Nature in International Relations Emilian Kavalski and Magdalena Zolkos We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly

in Recognition and Global Politics
Matthew S. Weinert

11 Recognition in and of World Society Matthew S. Weinert Why ‘recognition’? The term resonates differently and has distinctive implications depending on its use. The first is grammatical: to recognize something is to comprehend some

in Recognition and Global Politics
Volker M. Heins

4 Recognition, Multiculturalism and the Allure of Separatism Volker M. Heins In Charles Taylor's seminal writings, the revival of the nineteenth-century concept of ‘recognition’ was closely connected to the birth of ‘multiculturalism’ as a public policy and normative idea. This connection has

in Recognition and Global Politics
Robbie Shilliam

7 In Recognition of the Abyssinian General Robbie Shilliam I am an Abyssinian General. These are my troops. Do not cross this bridge. You see me lying down with cutlass in my hand? I will cut you if you cross. No plantation work at Lusignan today. Or tomorrow. Not here, nor anywhere in Demerara

in Recognition and Global Politics
Constance Duncombe

Recognition is key to understanding how representations influence foreign policymaking. Until recently, the role of recognition in IR has been largely overlooked, to the detriment of a fuller understanding of world politics. 1 The more traditional approaches of IR continue to focus on the power of material interests in defining foreign policy objectives, which are framed almost exclusively in terms of relative or absolute gains. This framing also relies on an understanding that states are rational actors, and that rationality can be defined

in Representation, recognition and respect in world politics