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Politics, Pageantry and Colonialism

Royal tours of the 1800s and early 1900s, and since, have created much documentation, perhaps the most obvious record contained in newspapers and magazines, newsreels and then radio and television broadcasts. Tours expressed and promoted royal and imperial authority, though in some instances they revealed resistance against expansionist designs. The royal visitor was the central actor in a tour, but was surrounded by an entourage of other people and a store of paraphernalia that played essential roles. This book examines how presentation is managed when ambassadors are sent in place of the royal personage. Sultan Alauddin of Aceh mounted a royal tour by proxy in which he was embodied - and concealed - in his gifts and in the humbler persons of his placeholders. Prince Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh, provided a template for later royal tours in three ways. First, he pioneered a new relationship with the Royal Navy as a training institution for British princes. Second, his lengthy visits paved the way for similarly ambitious global tours. Alfred's tours cultivated a range of trusted support staff. Imperial citizenship and even Britishness were embraced by non- English and non- British subjects of the queen. One young prince who was present in Britain at some of the most glittering events was Thakur Sahib Bhagvatsinh, a Rajput who ruled Gondal. The book also discusses Kaiser Wilhelm II's tour, King Sisowath and Emperor Khai Dinh's tour to France, the Portuguese crown prince's tour of Africa, and tours during Smuts's Raj.

therefore challenged the legitimacy of the current ruler. The former are often labelled as pretenders or claimants. The latter, who without any dynastic justification pretended they were some royal personage such as a king, prince, queen or princess, may be categorised as royal impostors.7 According to the OED, ‘pretender’ means broadly one ‘who puts forth a claim, or who aspires to or aims at something; a claimant, candidate, or aspirant; now one who makes baseless pretensions’; the term came into common use at the end of the sixteenth century. The important meaning for

in Impostures in early modern England
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The embassy of Sultan Alauddin of Aceh to the Netherlands, 1601– 1603

Royal tours are staged presentations of the crowned self before random or selected spectators. Elements of a tour may include public processions, uniformed retainers, honour guards, display of flags, levees or durbahs, religious ceremonies and gifts. The royal personage may travel in open carriage or closed litter, and in audiences may be elevated on a dais on public display or concealed by a curtain. Forms of obeisance

in Royals on tour
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Royal travel between colonies and metropoles

particularly important documentation. Image, after all, was a key ingredient in the popularity (or lack of it) of royal personages, with tours carefully arranged for maximum exposure of the visitors. The invention of photography, and development of cameras that could be used by amateurs – royals and others – made possible posed, official and informal shots. These provide not just portraits of individuals, but portrayals of the

in Royals on tour
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who assumed the identity of a royal personage in order to achieve either a personal goal or that of a political faction. It tries to understand them in the various circumstances of a vacuum of power, such as a political or succession crisis, which provided fertile ground for their claims. The early eighteenth-century case of George Psalmanazar, the pretended Formosan, prompted me to inquire whether this was an isolated case, or if other instances of ethnic imposture existed in early modern England. Hence, Chapter 6 investigates people who claimed to be of a

in Impostures in early modern England
The Bank Job (2008) and the British heist movie

conspiracy theory narrative, The Bank Job possibly seemed to be opting for the least plausible version of the story. The film does not mention Princess Margaret by name, though there is little doubt regarding the identity of the ‘certain royal personage’ identified in the photographs: ‘Holy shit, you know who that is!’ exclaims Terry Leather (Statham) when he sees the evidence for

in Crank it up
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; even Scottish and Irish feminists participated in English campaigns. Finally, Muslims living in England hailed from all over the Empire and the world, from South Asia to Northern Africa; some had been born in England. Quilliam identified himself as Manx, British and Muslim. Muslims could be sailors, ayahs or even royal personages, and they did not always share the same understanding or interpretation

in The harem, slavery and British imperial culture
Royal tours of ‘Africa Italiana’ under fascism

that the king made five official visits to Italy’s colonies while the Duce made only two raises a question over Pes’s secondary argument, that the king was ‘only a subsidiary actor in the process’. 11 In practical terms this is undoubtedly true, but what about the symbolic terms that are so crucial to the political role of a royal personage? The question is made more pressing by any examination of illustrated magazines such

in Royals on tour
Poets and novelists in national conversation

rivals. Their rivalry comes to a head very much later in the novel on the day of the ‘Skimmity-ride’, with Henchard engaging Farfrae in man-to-man combat (Henchard with one arm tied behind his back). Earlier on the same day Farfrae, who has now replaced Henchard as Mayor, officially welcomes an unnamed ‘Royal Personage’ (presumably Prince Albert) who is visiting the town. Henchard

in These Englands
Open Access (free)

the military hospital she had established in Hampshire were carefully researched and designed using illustrations from the weekly pictorials. Authenticity became the watchword of films about this royal personage, not least in this case because some of its spectators had lived through the events represented. But authenticity did not rule out hagiography, and the Queen was portrayed as a saintly, if well-dressed, head of a

in The British monarchy on screen