The career and writings of Peter Heylyn
Author: Anthony Milton

This is a full-length study of one of the most prolific and controversial polemical authors of the seventeenth century. It provides a detailed analysis of the ways in which Laudian and royalist polemical literature was created, tracing continuities and changes in a single corpus of writings from 1621 through to 1662. In the process, the author presents new perspectives on the origins and development of Laudianism and ‘Anglicanism’, and on the tensions within royalist thought. The book is neither a conventional biography nor simply a study of printed works, but instead constructs an integrated account of Peter Heylyn's career and writings in order to provide the key to understanding a profoundly polemical author. Throughout the book, Heylyn's shifting views and fortunes prompt a reassessment of the relative coherence and stability of royalism and Laudianism.

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Religion and politics in Heylyn’s career and writings
Anthony Milton

these shifts in printed opinion also reflect the type of writing to which Heylyn devoted his efforts. Heylyn was an instinctively polemical writer, his views always expressed with a clarity and dogmatism according to his immediate polemical requirements. But this mustering of the whole armoury of polemical weapons in each publication meant that, as his polemical needs varied from work to work, so inconsistencies could emerge across the range of his publications. The 223 Laudian and royalist polemic rigidity with which Heylyn expressed his views need not imply that

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
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Anthony Milton

surprisingly little attention from historians. Partly this may reflect the hostility that he has traditionally aroused, and the assumption not only that such a disagreeable figure is not worthy of study, but also that the writings of such an apparently venal and mendacious writer would not repay serious analysis. But Heylyn’s neglect also in part reflects his unfashionable choice of sides. As a supporter of Archbishop Laud and of the royalist cause in the Civil War, Heylyn selected parties which have always received relatively limited historical attention. Royalism has never

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Heylyn and the Civil War
Anthony Milton

, motion or knowledge’ and that he had only ‘composed them for his own satisfaction’.5 Robert Sanderson, who had enthusiastically dedicated sermons to Laud in 1637 ‘preached by appointment of your grace’, gave a visitation sermon at Grantham in 1641 in which he specifically distinguished the Church of England’s position from those who had busied themselves and 107 Laudian and royalist polemic troubled others with putting forward new rites and ceremonies with scandal and without law, using the church’s name for the serving of their own purposes.6 How would the pragmatic

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Anthony Milton

Chapter 5 Dealing with the Interregnum T he execution of the king sent shock waves through the royalist community. But it also posed important questions for the route that royalists should now take. With Charles II an absent and uncrowned monarch, and no prospect of negotiations with the newly created English republic, royalists faced a difficult dilemma as to what their course of action should be. Through its offer of the Engagement the new regime presented royalists with a means of affirming their loyalty to the new regime, while the 1652 Act of Oblivion

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Heylyn and the Restoration church, 1660–1688
Anthony Milton

secure the maximum degree of public support for the new regime, it was vital that, where possible, offers of office were used to build a broad base of support for the government. In the church, this meant that bishoprics should be offered to ex-presbyterians such as Richard Baxter and Edward Reynolds. There were in fact very few Laudian appointments to bishoprics, and with the exception of Juxon those who had been Laudian bishops in the pre-war church – Warner, Piers and Wren – were not given further promotion.7 Restoration England was full of embittered royalists who

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Anthony Milton

defending government policies in the 1630s, he did not actually perform the role of a print propagandist until 43 Laudian and royalist polemic 1635, when he had already received most of his rewards from the government, and had already launched systematic attacks on his and the regime’s opponents. His time as a pamphleteer in support of the government would also only last a brief two years. This is not to say that he was not active as an apologist of the regime, and a diligent servant of its interests, for the entire decade. Rather, his role as a public polemical writer

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Anthony Milton

principles of the established church.12 His father would certainly appear to have been strikingly well read in religion. His study was well supplied with books, which included an eight-volume set of Augustine’s works, six volumes of Nicholas de Lyra and a volume of ‘the Counsells generall and provinciall’ – a remarkable collection of patristic literature for a layman, all of which he gave to his son Peter in his will.13 Heylyn also seems to have spent a brief period of time at 9 Laudian and royalist polemic Merchant Taylors’ School – a seedbed of later Laudians

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Polemic and ideology in Heylyn’s 1630s writings
Anthony Milton

collective ‘ideal type’, there is a particular value in analysing the perhaps less coherent and more contingent body of opinions that a single Laudian author expounded.1 One feature of such a focused study, however, must be to note the ways in which the specific polemical demands being made on a particular text may have altered the tone or balance of an argument. Heylyn did not compose 81 Laudian and royalist polemic unified, comprehensive statements of Laudian principles. Rather, each one of his works (with the partial exception of the History of the Sabbath) was written

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Dale Townshend

This article seeks to provide an account of the political biases at stake in the conceptualisation of medieval English history in Ethelwina, Or The House of Fitz-Auburne (1799), the first fiction of the prolific Gothic romancer-turned-Royal Body Guard T. J. Horsley, Curties. Having considered Curties‘s portrayal of the reign of King Edward III in the narrative in relation to formal historiographies of the period, the article turns to address the politics of Curties‘s appropriation of Shakespeare‘s Hamlet.

Gothic Studies