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Marie Helena Loughlin

ch a pt e r 8 Literature: Representing Male Same-Sex Erotic Relationships and Desires Literature: Male Edmund Spenser (?1552–99), poet Educated at Cambridge, where he met his dear friend and mentor Gabriel Harvey, Spenser later became the Earl of Leicester’s secretary, and gained the support and patronage of Sir Walter Ralegh and Sir Philip Sidney. Spenser’s works include the immediately popular Shepheardes Calender (1579); the sonnet sequence Amoretti and marriage poem Epithalamion (both 1595); the mythopoetic allegory of Tudor court life Colin Clouts Come

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

ch a pt e r 9 Literature: Representing Female Same-Sex Erotic Relationships and Desires Literature: Female Desiderius Erasmus (?1466–1536), humanist scholar Erasmus’s major works are Adages (a collection of sententiae or wise sayings or maxims (1500)), the Enchiridion (a manual of Christian living (1503)), The Praise of Folly (a satire of contemporary European social and religious attitudes (1511)) and Colloquies (Latin dialogues on various social, moral, and religious topics (1518/19)). His Scriptural commentaries and editions of classical writers and the

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
An anthology of literary texts and contexts

This book is an anthology of selections from works dealing with same-sex love, desire, sexual acts, and relationships during the period 1550-1735 in early modern England. It presents religious and moral writings, pseudo-medical writings, criminal pamphlets, travel writings, and letters on same-sex desire. The condemnation of male and female same-sex sexual acts is embedded in the earliest Christian theology. The early modern medical, pseudo-medical, and anatomical texts in Latin are surprisingly reticent about the physiological and anatomical aspects of homoerotic sexuality and desire. Canon law had long condemned male same-sex sexual acts. The 1533-34 statute in England forbade male same-sex sexual acts but ignored female same-sex intercourse. English travel narratives dealing with the sexual customs of other cultures often present sexual licentiousness as endemic, sometimes touching specifically on sodomy and tribadism. The most detailed presentations of same-sex erotic relationships in non-European cultures are those relating to Turkey and the Turkish seraglio. Familiar letters, such as between James I and VI, could reveal personal secrets and be radically transgressive in their emphasis on fostering love and desire. The book discusses homo-sexual subculture during 1700-1730, translation of Latin and Greek texts, and numerous literature representing male and female same-sex erotic relationships. The largely 'socially diffused homosexuality' of the seventeenth century changed profoundly with 'clothes, gestures, language' connoting 'homosexuality'. The book shows how literary genres of male same-sex and female-sex desires such as Shakespeare's Sonnets, and Catherine Trotter's Agnes de Castro allow the modern reader to chart changes in their representation.

Marie Helena Loughlin

only absence, hear mostly silence’, since female–female sex is only rarely defined as sodomy or buggery (Renaissance 167–9). Ironically, the relative absence of the tribade and tribadism in a wide range of texts and discourses at least until the very late seventeenth century has meant that modern analyses of female same-sex erotic relationships have always turned to other ways of accessing such relationships, and have rarely employed the tribade and tribadism as the same privileged point of access to same-sex relationships as has often been the case with sodomy and

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Abstract only
Marie Helena Loughlin

ch a pt e r 4 Travel Writings Travel Writings Introduction English travel narratives that deal with the sexual customs of other cultures, particularly those of the New World and the East, often present sexual licentiousness as endemic, sometimes touching specifically on sodomy and tribadism. However, by far the most detailed presentations of same-sex erotic relationships in non-European cultures are those relating to Turkey and the Turkish seraglio, where both sodomy and tribadism are represented as springing from a rigidly observed and religiously mandated

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

ch a pt e r 6 The New ‘Homosexual’ Subculture, 1700–30 The New ‘Homosexual’ Subculture Introduction In 1691, the Societies for the Reformation of Manners were formed to cleanse England of sin and degeneracy. Although the Societies had many targets, including prostitution, swearing, Sabbath-breaking, and general lewdness, they focused on sexual sin, and particularly on male same-sex erotic relationships, practices, and early communities, engineering the entrapment and subsequent prosecution of ‘homosexuals’, especially those who were apparently beginning to meet

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

discussing male same-sex erotic relationships, desires, and sexual acts was translated into English before 1750. Such translations were not subject to uniform censorship and it is misleading to group them all under the label ‘crudely bowdlerized’ (Smith 289–90 n9). Different classical genres and early modern perceptions of their purposes made for different levels of explicitness in translation. Broadly, the classical love lyric and particularly the satiric epigram tend to be fairly explicit about male same-sex erotic relationships, desires, and sexual acts, and thus tend

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735