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‘No interest. Not suitable for treatment’
Lance Pettitt

5 William Trevor’s screen fictions: ‘No interest. Not suitable for treatment’ Lance Pettitt The television version of The Ballroom of Romance struck a chord in the folk memory of its audience, some of whom remembered their youthful excursions to similar dancehalls with nostalgia.1 This essay contests the view that Trevor’s work for the screen is somehow secondary to his many and notable accomplishments as a novelist and short-story writer. Instead, it suggests that his career demonstrates the pervasive inter-connections between these different forms, and that

in William Trevor
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Revaluations

William Trevor is one of the most accomplished and celebrated contemporary prose writers in the English language. This book offers a comprehensive examination of the oeuvre of one of the most accomplished and celebrated practitioners writing in the English language. Trevor is very interested in popular literature and how certain genres run through people's lives like tunes or family memories. His characters are often 'turned in on themselves', strange, extreme, at odds with the world. The various betrayals, manipulations and acts of cruelty that constitute the representative events of The Old Boys are typical of Trevor's England. The book also explores the ways in which Trevor's liberal humanist premises condition his response to issues of historical consciousness, ideological commitment and political violence. Trevor's short story, 'Lost Ground', from After Rain, conforms to Aristotle's vision of tragedy because it depicts a truly horrendous situation inside a family in Northern Ireland. Notable screen fictions illustrating long-term migrant themes include Attracta, Beyond the Pale and Fools of Fortune. Trevor's short story 'The Ballroom of Romance' evokes memories of dancehall days, partly explains this public appeal, which was enhanced by the BAFTA award-winning film adaptation of the story by Pat O'Connor. Love and Summer is a lyrical, evocative story of the emotional turbulence based on a critical variety of nostalgia that recognises both the stifling limitations of a small-town environment and the crucial connection between ethics and place.

The New Zealand television series Mataku as Indigenous gothic
Ian Conrich

creation of gothic screen fiction. It has been drawn mainly to its immediate Indigenous groups and stories of the Native American people, for gothic fantasies of alternative and ancient cultures that are commonly depicted threatening and assaulting the intruder or white settler. Examples appear in some of the genre’s most celebrated and mainstream films, such as Poltergeist ( 1982 ), in which the source of the heightened

in Globalgothic
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Editor: Glennis Byron

The late twentieth century saw growing number of articles and books appearing on new national gothic; however, the wider context for this had not really been addressed. This collection of essays explores an emerging globalgothic useful for all students and academics interested in the gothic, in international literature, cinema, and cyberspace, presenting examples of globalgothic in the 21st-century forms. It analyses a global dance practice first performed in Japan, Ankoku butoh, and surveys the ways in which Indigenous cultures have been appropriated for gothic screen fictions. To do this, it looks at the New Zealand television series on Maori mythologies, Mataku. The unlocated 'vagabonds' of Michel Faber's "The Fahrenheit Twins" are doubles (twins) of a gothic trajectory as well as globalgothic figures of environmental change. The book considers the degree to which the online vampire communities reveal cultural homogenisation and the imposition of Western forms. Global culture has created a signature phantasmagoric spatial experience which is uncanny. Funny Games U.S. (2008) reproduces this process on the material level of production, distribution and reception. The difference between the supposedly 'primitive' local associated with China and a progressive global city associated with Hong Kong is brought out through an analysis of cannibal culture. In contemporary Thai horror films, the figure of horror produced is neither local nor global but simultaneously both. The book also traces the development, rise and decline of American gothic, and looks at one of the central gothic figures of the twenty-first century: the zombie.

“Edgy” TV drama Queer as Folk, Sex and the City, Carnivàle
Robin Nelson

This chapter explores a risky, ‘edgy’ television which flouts the historic tendency for small-screen fictions to be conservative, particularly in the USA where a Least Objectionable Programming (LOP) strategy dominated the ‘network era’. Three chosen examples of ‘edgy’ television, QaF, comes out of a small independent company in the UK, whilst SatC and Carnivale are produced by a substantial, and even more independent, subscription channel in the USA. In the past, commercial companies were thought to be chasing large audiences to please advertisers in a context where a disposition to bland product to achieve ratings held sway. Niche marketing opportunities today allow bold companies to aim to attract primary audiences with distinctive product and only subsequently to seek to build bigger audiences by new means of secondary distribution. Given the nature of the younger, more affluent target-market demographic, there is room furthermore for products which set out to shock. As these examples suggest, creative treatments can render the material such as to elicit a shock of new insight rather than merely shock for the sake of shock.

in State of play
Gary Cassidy

This chapter examines the relationship between issues concerning substance and style in relation to acting, specifically, the performance of laughing. It considers the significance of an act that is widely considered to be involuntary, spontaneous and authentic – thus, substantive – but that, in the context of performance, is marked by planning and technical execution – thus becoming a matter of style. The chapter begins by outlining the critical terrain, setting up the argument that the substantive event of laughter depends, in the context of screen fiction, on the stylistic act. It then moves on to its main case study, namely the sitcom Friends. Specifically, it explores the scene in Series 5, Episode 2 in which Rachel Green (Jennifer Aniston) laughs after confessing to a recently married Ross Geller (David Schwimmer) that she still loves him. Through in-depth close analysis of Aniston’s and Schwimmer’s performance choices, the chapter unpicks the different layers (both character and actor) that frame the laughter. It demonstrates that Aniston’s is unconvincing laughter that appears self-conscious and not properly embodied, which is contrasted with Schwimmer’s performance choices. As the chapter argues, this is not a failure of performance by Aniston, but actually a deliberate acting choice, as she is using this unconvincing laughter as a tool for her character to manage the awkward moment and to convey her character’s embarrassment and emotional vulnerability. With a successful performance by the actor of an unsuccessful performance by the character, Aniston also adds a reflexive quality to the scene, which aids the characterisation.

in Substance / style
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Aims, scope, methods and standpoints
Robin Nelson

, Eliot, Dickens) with high-art connotations, in the USA it might indicate the philosophical dimensions of Star Trek. Hopefully, the idea of “high end” will become clearer by exemplification as the book progresses but an indication at the outset of some conscious exclusions might assist. There are many important kinds of small-screen fictions which my selection of “high-end” American and British examples inevitably excludes. Thus I do not in this book directly discuss examples of regular TV fare, daytime television, the soaps or series and serials which elsewhere I have

in State of play
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Documentary world views
Thomas Austin

potential and the limitations of cultural imagining, in which documentary (overlooked by Scarry) plays an important part. Of course, such consequences may also be encountered by viewers of fiction film and television, and it would be both sweeping and wrong to suggest that this kind of material is entirely divorced from the ‘real world’ or irrelevant to audiences’ understandings of that world.8 Moreover, the categories of screen fiction and documentary are fluid, shifting, and far from monolithic; each encompasses a 08chap seven.p65 179 6/28/2007, 10:41 AM 180

in Watching the world
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Thomas Austin

, this book will provide an example of some of the insights that can be achieved by turning attention to this unaccountably neglected object of study. Investigations like this are long overdue if viewers of documentary are to be treated with the seriousness with which audiences for screen fictions are now being addressed. The politics of location Ideas of location, both literal and figurative, are central to my analysis. If documentary is about gaining mediated access to ‘the world’, where exactly is this world in relation to the audience? How is it framed and

in Watching the world
Mikel J. Koven

understanding of those images will be the same. This reductionism can be seen in many of the discussions of myth and film in Martin and Ostwalt’s edited collection, as well in monographs such as Geoffrey Hill’s Illuminating Shadows: The Mythic Power of Film ( 1992 ) and Terrie Waddell’s Mis/takes: Archetype, Myth, and Identity in Screen Fiction ( 2006 ). Another trap that lies in wait for explorers into the realm of myth and cinema is to confuse those genres of ‘oral folk narrative’ which Bascom takes great care to separate. Again, I’m not using Bascom as any kind of

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium