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The reception of Christianity not mysterious, 1696–1702
Justin Champion

Reading scripture 3 . Reading Scripture: the reception of Christianity not mysterious, 1696–1702 religion ... it is more easy to guess what he was not, than to tell what ‘A heforwas. ’Tis certain, he was neither Jew nor Mahometan: But whether he S was a Christian, a Deist, a Pantheist, an Hobbist, or a Spinozist, is the Question’.1 Toland’s writings had ‘alarm’d all sober well-meaning Christians, and set the whole clergy against him’. Having explored how Toland lived and worked in a world of libraries and books, it is time to examine how his books worked in

in Republican learning
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

Wyclif devoted many years of his life to the intensive study of Scripture, beginning formally with exegetical lectures that survive as a sequence of postils (probably written between 1371 and 1376), now collectively known as Postils on the Whole of the Bible , a unique and extensive commentary that won Wyclif considerable respect as an exegete. 1 In these, we witness his meticulous defence of the authority of scripture, and of the literal veracity of all of its parts. This is developed further in On the Truth of Holy Scripture (1377

in John Wyclif
The moral life and the state
Jeff Rosen

2 Jowett’s scriptures: the moral life and the state Theological questions on the Isle of Wight On 31 December 1864, Julia Margaret Cameron sent her friend Sir John Herschel a gift of photographs and a letter informing him about a turning point in her creative life. After a year spent experimenting with different subjects, she seized upon the goal of pursuing a religious iconography in photography. The following declaration accompanied her post: ‘Yesterday I dispatched for you & dear Lady Herschel one series of my Photographs which form I think now a theological

in Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’
Cathy Shrank

drama: first, under what Vincent Gillespie has called the ‘long shadow’ cast by Archbishop Arundel's Constitutions (1409), which placed strict limits on vernacular translations of scripture; secondly, in response to the various phases of the English Reformation, in the light of the onus that Reformers placed both on the Bible – rather than the Church – as the source of religious authority, and on worship in the vernacular, not (as previously) in Latin. 3 ‘Moralities’ have been selected for this study because they are

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama
David J. Appleby

Black Bartholomew’s Day Chapter 3 Scripture, historicism and the critique of authority C iting Matthew 10:16 in his afternoon farewell sermon at St Stephen’s Walbrook on August 17 – ‘Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves; be ye therefore wise as serpents and harmless as doves’ – Thomas Watson advised the godly to join the serpent with the dove.1 The Nottinghamshire minister William Cross assured his Beeston congregation that God was able to ‘give the wisdom of the Serpent to such as have the Doves Innocency’.2 The succeeding verses of

in Black Bartholomew’s Day
Framing biblical emotions in the Book of Common Prayer and the Homilies
David Bagchi

out to impose a ‘script’ upon their audience and readership. The script they intended to be so inscribed was not, however, a liturgy or even a sermon, but Holy Scripture itself. And, to describe this process, they chose an image more technologically up to date than one drawn from a scribal age, as is apparent from the very first homily

in The Renaissance of emotion
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Toleration, Supersessionism and Judaeo-Centric Eschatology
Lawrence Rabone

This article on an early modern pamphlet which can be found in the John Rylands Library Special Collections asserts the importance of John Goodwin’s analysis of Zechariah 13:3 in A Post-Script or Appendix to […] Hagiomastix (1647). I argue that this pamphlet’s significance is not only its emphasis on toleration, but also that it is a striking example of Judaeo-centric millenarian thought in which Zechariah 12–14 is understood as prophesying a future time in which the Jews will be restored to the Land of Israel. I also analyse the pamphlet’s relationship to supersessionism and compare Goodwin’s interpretation with those of Samuel Rutherford, William Prynne, John Owen and, in particular, Jean Calvin. I explain that Goodwin’s use of the analogy of Scripture hermeneutic helps to explain his belief in Judaeo-centric eschatology. I then show how one of Goodwin’s followers, Daniel Taylor, used Judaeo-centric biblical exegesis to petition Oliver Cromwell for Jewish readmission to England.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library