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Transnational harvest horror and racial vulnerability at the turn of the millennium
Sara Wasson

procurement, informed by legacies of colonisation and chattel slavery. Read at a figural level, these texts also symbolise systematic exclusions, structural violence, and slow violence, as Rob Nixon defines it, violence in which time itself is a force of ruination. 4 ‘How does one mourn the interminable event?’ asks Christina Sharpe in her passionate lamentation of the ongoing legacies of Atlantic chattel slavery. 5 I am concerned with ‘economies of abandonment’, in Elizabeth Povinelli’s phrase, in which the wellbeing of some is predicated on the suffering of others, and

in Transplantation Gothic
Tissue transfer in literature, film, and medicine
Author: Sara Wasson

This book is a shadow cultural history of transplantation as mediated through medical writing, science fiction, life writing and visual arts in a Gothic mode, from the nineteenth century to the present. Works in these genres explore the experience of donors or suppliers, recipients and practitioners, and simultaneously express transfer-related suffering and are complicit in its erasure. Examining texts from Europe, North America and India, the book resists exoticising predatorial tissue economies and considers fantasies of harvest as both product and symbol of ‘slow violence’ (Rob Nixon), precarity and structural ruination under neoliberal capitalism. Gothic tropes, intertextualities and narrative conventions are used in life writing to express the affective and conceptual challenges of post-transplant being, and used in medical writing to manage the ambiguities of hybrid bodies, as a ‘clinical necropoetics’. In their efforts to articulate bioengineered hybridity, these works are not only anxious but speculative. Works discussed include nineteenth-century Gothic, early twentieth-century fiction and film, 1970s American hospital organ theft horror in literature and film, turn-of-the-millennium fiction and film of organ sale, postmillennial science fiction dystopias, life writing and scientific writing from the nineteenth century to the present. Throughout, Gothic representations engage contemporary debates around the management of chronic illness, the changing economics of healthcare and the biopolitics of organ procurement and transplantation – in sum, the strange times and weird spaces of tissue mobilities. The book will be of interest to academics and students researching Gothic studies, science fiction, critical medical humanities and cultural studies of transplantation.

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Writing wounds
Sara Wasson

has been the image of bodies wounded in ways that are not yet finished. I have sought to respect stories that do not end or stories that do not end neatly: the wounds of donors that spread to include intangible wounds like reduced earning capacity, pain or stigma, and recipients’ wounds that keep the body open for more changes – immunosuppressant pharmacology, the medical gaze, and other interventions. 2 I am interested in extended durations, the slow violence of legacies of health inequality and the long aftermath of care. Elsewhere, I have suggested the

in Transplantation Gothic
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

does? Do we stand by as academics until we have more certainty, more facts to analyse? Or do we take a stand and support those calling for change? Is it our place to do that? Is our support needed? Would it be welcomed? Slow violence In New York, the trauma was sudden and unexpected. In Grenfell, what happened was shocking, of course, but it was also the predicted outcome of a slow, everyday trauma that had been building through decades of neglect, discrimination and inequality, exacerbated since 2008 by the impact of austerity. Slow, everyday trauma does not so much

in Change and the politics of certainty
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Expanding geopolitical imaginations
Jen Bagelman

city in which he lives (Bagelman, 2016 ). At once, Nomad suggests, this circular map represents a feeling of inclusivity, and yet it also indicates a sense of containment or even imprisonment (Bagelman, 2016 ). The question marks subtly drawn over the buildings in this map represent, to Nomad, an experience of waiting (Bagelman, 2016 ). As a person whose has been seeking refugee status for over eight years, waiting is an inherent part of his urban life. This map captures the intimate ‘slow violence’ that cannot be seen when we view

in Sanctuary cities and urban struggles
Open Access (free)
Thom Davies

and Planning D; Society and Space, 1–19. Bosworth, K. 2019. The people know best: Situating the counterexpertise of populist pipeline opposition movements. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 109(2), 581–592. Boudia, S., Creager, A. N., Frickel, S., Henry, E., Jas, N., Reinhardt, C., and Roberts, J. 2018. Residues: Rethinking chemical environments. Engaging Science, Technology, and Society, Society for Social Studies of Science, 4, 165–178. Davies, T. 2018. Toxic space and time: Slow violence, necropolitics, and petrochemical pollution. Annals of the

in Toxic truths
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Given the significant similarities and differences between the welfare states of Northern Europe and their reactions to the perceived 'refugee crisis' of 2015, the book focuses primarily on the three main cases of Denmark, Sweden and Germany. Placed in a wider Northern European context – and illustrated by those chapters that also discuss refugee experiences in Norway and the UK – the Danish, Swedish and German cases are the largest case studies of this edited volume. Thus, the book contributes to debates on the governance of non-citizens and the meaning of displacement, mobility and seeking asylum by providing interdisciplinary analyses of a largely overlooked region of the world, with two specific aims. First, we scrutinize the construction of the 2015 crisis as a response to the large influx of refugees, paying particular attention to the disciplinary discourses and bureaucratic structures that are associated with it. Second, we investigate refugees’ encounters with these bureaucratic structures and consider how these encounters shape hopes for building a new life after displacement. This allows us to show that the mobility of specific segments of the world’s population continues to be seen as a threat and a risk that has to be governed and controlled. Focusing on the Northern European context, our volume interrogates emerging policies and discourses as well as the lived experiences of bureaucratization from the perspective of individuals who find themselves the very objects of bureaucracies.

Annika Lindberg

others is one of the ways in which the welfare state (re)constructs itself and consolidates its borders (Aas, 2013; Minimum rights policies 89 Barker, 2017). Nevertheless, enforcing policies that inflict slow violence (Mayblin et al., 2019) onto those ‘excepted’ (Khosravi, 2010) from social, political, and legal membership causes dilemmas for the agents of enforcement within border-oriented welfare bureaucracies. These dilemmas, and the ways in which border bureaucrats make sense of and address them, are explored in the remainder of this chapter. The crisis of the

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Open Access (free)
Thom Davies

., Dolezal, N., and Moross, J. 2016. Safecast: Successful citizen-­science for radiation measurement and communication after Fukushima. Journal of Radiological Protection, 36(2), S82. Davies, T. 2019. Slow violence and toxic geographies: “Out of sight” to whom? Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, 1–19. Gabrys, J. 2014. Programming environments: Environmentality and citizen sensing in the smart city. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 32(1), 30–48. Irwin, A. 1995. Citizen Science: A Study of People, Expertise, and Sustainable Development. London

in Toxic truths