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Economy, football and Istria
Alex J. Bellamy

5 The nation in social practice I Economy, football and Istria The following two chapters assess the way that the disputes about the meaning of Croatian national identity in the 1990s (discussed in the previous chapter) were manifested in a variety of social practices. This third level of abstraction is concerned with how competing conceptions of national identity (Chapter 4) that make use of abstract frames (Chapter 3) are manifested and embedded in social practice and in identifying sites of resistance to the national ‘common sense’. The six brief studies

in The formation of Croatian national identity
Language, education and the Catholic Church
Alex J. Bellamy

6 The nation in social practice II Language, education and the Catholic Church The language question Many writers argue that language is one of the distinguishing aspects of a nation. Eugene Hammel, for instance, suggested that in the Balkans, linguistic and religious identification are the primary sources of nationality.1 Attempts to form a codified language for the Southern Slavs were a cornerstone of the Illyrian movement in the nineteenth century and both Yugoslav states tried to enforce a standardised state language as a means of avoiding the potentially

in The formation of Croatian national identity
Cathrine Brun
and
Cindy Horst

to happen, with a shift in power and influence to other actors, there is a need to understand and recognise the relational ethics that operate alongside the formal script in a humanitarian response. We conducted a review of the literature on civic humanitarianism and humanitarian acts situated in social practice. To narrow down the field, we focused on work that addressed situations of violent conflict and displacement. We searched for literature using keywords of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Fiction, theology, and social practice
Author:

The politics of Middle English parables examines the dynamic intersection of fiction, theology, and social practice in translated Gospel stories. Parables occupy a prominent place in Middle English literature, appearing in dream visions and story collections as well as in lives of Christ and devotional treatises. While most scholarship approaches these scriptural stories as stable vehicles of Christian teachings, this book characterises Gospel parables as ambiguous, riddling stories that invited audience interpretation and inspired the construction of new, culturally inflected narratives. In parables related to labour, social inequality, charity, and penance, the book locates a creative theological discourse through which writers reconstructed scriptural stories and, in doing so, attempted to shape Christian belief and practice. Analysis of these diverse retellings reveals not what a given parable meant in a definitive sense but rather how Middle English parables inscribe the ideologies, power structures, and cultural debates of late medieval Christianity.

Abstract only
Thomas Wartenberg

Film theorists and philosophers have both contended that narrative fiction films cannot present philosophical arguments. After canvassing a range of objections to this claim, this article defends the view that films are able to present philosophical thought experiments that can function as enthymemic arguments. An interpretation of Michel Gondry‘s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) is given in which the films criticism of the technology of memory erasure is just such a thought experiment, one that functions as a counter-example to utilitarianism as a theory for the justification of social practices.

Film Studies
Anne Quéma

The article analyzes the relationship between social laws and the self in Gothic fiction, and argues that contemporary English Gothic fiction enacts the way subjects adhere to social practices and structures. In this scenario, characters are monsters of social conformity and docility. On this basis, Susan Hill‘s The Mist in the Mirror and The Woman in Black can be interpreted as critiques of the masculine quest for identity by means of adherence to the family as institution and habitus. The novels represent this process of ideological adherence by creating a dehistoricized plot and setting haunted by a ghost exerting what Bourdieu calls symbolic violence on the protagonists, and from which women have been absented.

Gothic Studies
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

practicality prevents it). This is the same foundational commitment that animates human rights work. The humanist core to both of these forms of social practice is a similar kind of belief in the ultimate priority of moral claims made by human beings as human beings rather than as possessors of any markers of identity or citizenship. What differences exist between humanitarianism and human rights are largely sociological – the contextual specifics of the evolution of two different forms of social activism. I have argued elsewhere, for example, that

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Gender Norm Change during Displacement?
Michelle Lokot

be stretched without breaking ( Droeber, 2005 : 306). Using the concept of resistance recognises that in the Middle East, the ‘public transcript’ about gender norms can over-emphasise men’s dominance, ‘pigeonholing’ men as ‘static subjects’ ( Inhorn, 2012 : 45). Instead, this paper seeks to avoid ‘harmful caricatures’ that negate the idea of masculinities and femininities as ‘dynamic social practice[s

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Difficulties of a Randomised Clinical Trial Confronted with Real Life in Southern Niger
Mamane Sani Souley Issoufou

trial (investigators, healthcare staff, families, community health agents, etc.). 2 According to UNESCO: ‘Joking relationships are a social practice performed among ethnolinguistic communities, groups and individuals to promote fraternity, solidarity and conviviality. They take the form of a playful taunting between two people from two communities that represent

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

than consumers in the global market economy. Finally, as pertinently observed by Carter et al. (2018) , a key thing wearables do is to make practices into problems when tracking physical activity for health and ‘wellness’/lifestyle purposes: everyday mobility has been reframed as a public health problem requiring ‘interventions’ to increase activity. Users’ activities can be monitored and uploaded to the internet, transforming social practices

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs