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Brian Sudlow

In this chapter we will attempt to synthesise some of the most common accounts of the history of secularisation in France and England during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Our aim is to arrive at some understanding of the nature of individual and societal secularisation in England and France, and assess, in spite of the vast differences, what correlations can be drawn between the two countries. This will help us understand more clearly the preoccupations of the French and English Catholic authors and the conditions of belief under which they

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Generic and thematic mutations in horror film
Editors: Richard J. Hand and Jay McRoy

From its earliest days, horror film has turned to examples of the horror genre in fiction, such as the Victorian Gothic, for source material. The horror film has continually responded to cultural pressures and ideological processes that resulted in new, mutated forms of the genre. Adaptation in horror cinema is a useful point of departure for articulating numerous socio-cultural trends. Adaptation for the purposes of survival proves the impetus for many horror movie monsters. This book engages generic and thematic adaptations in horror cinema from a wide range of aesthetic, cultural, political and theoretical perspectives. These diverse approaches further evidence the horror genre's obsession with corporeal transformation and narratological re-articulation. Many horror films such as Thomas Edison's Frankenstein, John S. Robertson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, David Cronenberg'sVideodrome, Abel Ferrara's Body Snatchers, and Terence Fisher's The Gorgon are discussed in the book. The book sheds welcome light upon some of the more neglected horror films of cinema's first century, and interrogates the myriad alterations and re-envisionings filmmakers must negotiate as they transport tales of terror between very different modes of artistic expression. It extends the volume's examination of adaptation as both an aesthetic process and a thematic preoccupation by revealing the practice of self-reflexivity and addresses the remake as adaptation. The book analyses the visual anarchy of avant-garde works, deploys the psychoanalytic film theory to interpret how science and technology impact societal secularisation, and explores the experimental extremes of adaptation in horror film.

Author: Brian Sudlow

This book is a comparative study of the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, this book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes which are considered to be emblematic of the Catholic literature.

Theology, politics, and Newtonian public science

This book explores at length the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, the book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes that are considered to be emblematic of Catholic literature. Its breadth will make it a useful guide for students wishing to become familiar with a wide range of such writings in France and England during this period.

Brian Sudlow

two tendencies which, we have argued, are central to their opposition to individual and societal secularisation. Their understanding and portrayal of the Church’s capacity to gather its members in a hierarchical fashion ( Chapter 7 ) correlate strongly with their search for a renewed religious porosity or shared meaning and purpose. The bogeyman of Catholic authoritarianism hardly bothers them, any more than authoritarianism bothers responsible secular bodies, such as medical authorities, who exclude their own mavericks for the sake of the public. In fact, for

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
An introduction
Richard J. Hand and Jay McRoy

Fisher’s The Gorgon (1964) as a meditation upon how science and technology impact societal secularisation. Similarly, by exploring the experimental extremes of adaptation in horror film, Murray Pomerance’s ‘Marion Crane Dies Twice’ reflects critically upon visionary director Gus Van Sant’s daring and controversial remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960). Finally, the five chapters that bring this

in Monstrous adaptations
Abstract only
Brian Sudlow

significance. In those cases where such societal activities are secularised in a programmatic fashion, as under Marxist or anticlerical governments, Dobbelaere refers to the process of ‘laicisation’. 32 This may of course happen through a series of gradual shifts in working culture. Other theorists have called these two trends evolutionary and revolutionary secularisation. 33 There are two other tendencies of note in societal secularisation which paradoxically retain a religious veneer. The first is that of civil religion, based heavily, but

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

Cavanaugh’s essay on societal secularisation provides us with a useful paradigm from which to begin analysing anti-secular alternatives. 1 Exploring this paradigm in all its theological resonances is unnecessary. The political and socio-economic dynamics which it outlines correlate with, and in other ways challenge, French and English Catholic writings about societal organisation. On the political level, Cavanaugh argues that ‘Eucharistic counter-politics’ have the capacity to undermine the secular State in two

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

reinforcement of materialism. Ultimately, from the antisecular perspective, there was no adequate economic doctrine (just as there was no adequate political doctrine) that could fail to respect the spiritual nature of humanity or sever material goods from their uses with regard to human nature and its divine calling. Whatever their differences, both French and English Catholic writers were agreed at least on that. Secularising education The various fears of the French and English Catholic authors about societal

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914