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Rashida K. Braggs
,
William Murray
, and
Elijah Parks

Music lives and breathes through the spaces of much of James Baldwin’s oeuvre. This article introduces a course that features Baldwin’s musical literature and teaches students to compose music inspired by their newfound knowledge of Baldwin. The course, entitled “James Baldwin’s Song,” was taught in the department of Africana Studies at Williams College in fall 2021. It guided students to listen to Baldwin in a different way—through a musical lens and by relating Baldwin’s wisdom to their own lives. This article takes readers behind the scenes as it shares some of the curricular choices that guided the course and student insights gleaned from it. Though students heard many things in Baldwin’s musical oeuvre, two ideas sang out most clearly: that the blues was not just music but was also a way of living, and that joy differed from happiness. Accordingly, the second half of this article illustrates these key concepts as featured in original songs from the professor and student co-authors.

James Baldwin Review
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Notes on methodology
Sarah Daynes

2 Interpreting songs: Notes on methodology Since the 1960s, popular music has developed enormously, largely due to technological progress in terms of musical delivery (vinyl records, cassettes, compact discs, minidisc, MP3 and so on) and to the proliferation of radio stations, television, and more recently personal computers (Jones 2000). Popular music gives a central importance to singing, and therefore to lyrics; from Otis Redding’s love songs to The Police’s “Roxanne” to the poetic texts of Bob Dylan to the seemingly innocuous blues of Muddy Waters, the

in Time and memory in reggae music
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Final vistas of Spenser and Shakespeare
Robert Lanier Reid

Spenser’s mutability-song: conclusion or transition? The Mutabilitie Cantos’ relation to The Faerie Queene remains a mystery. Is it a separate poem? – perhaps, considering its extensive and complete dramatic action, with a parallel comic subplot. Or a medullar episode of an uncompleted legend? – this seems more

in Renaissance psychologies
Author:

This book is the first edited collection of poems and songs written in the immediate aftermath of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. Of the seventy or so poems included in the anthology, many were published as broadsides and almost half were published in radical periodicals, such as the moderate Examiner and the ultra-radical Medusa with many from the Manchester Observer. Although I have provided headnotes and footnotes to support the reading of the texts, I intend them to stand alone, conveying as much of the original publication as possible, in order not to dilute the authenticity.

Following an introduction outlining the events before, during and after the massacre as well as background information on the radical press and broadside ballad, the poems are grouped into six sections according to theme, rather than chronologically or by publication because I want the reader to note the similarity between so many of the poems. Grouped in this manner, one cannot avoid the voices echoing down the centuries, speaking to us of the horrors of the time in texts that can no longer be ignored. Shelley’s Masque of Anarchy is included as an appendix in acknowledgement of its continuing significance to the representation of Peterloo.

This book is primarily aimed at students and lecturers of Romanticism and social history. With the bicentenary of the massacre in 2019 and Mike Leigh’s forthcoming film, I envisage the potential for a wider readership of people interested in learning more about one of the most seminal events in English history.

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Kate Bowan
and
Paul A. Pickering

personalities’. 1 Drawing from Webb’s metaphor, which implies an approach very similar to our own, this chapter will take for its key the song. More exactly, as noted in our introduction, we have selected three songs from a vast array of possibilities to examine in close detail: Rouget de Lisle’s war hymn the Marseillaise , Robert Burns’s Scots ballad John Anderson my Jo and Chartist leader Ernest Jones

in Sounds of liberty
Music culture in Jane Austen’s teenage years
Gillian Dooley

Introduction: music and the young Jane Austen The stories, poems and ‘scraps’ Jane Austen wrote in her teenage years are now well known as her ‘juvenilia’ – crazy, irreverent, transgressive miniatures of a wildly creative mind playing and experimenting with literature. During the same years Austen was studying music and forming a collection of songs and keyboard pieces that would stay with her throughout her life. On her return from school in 1786, a piano was bought for her and she apparently had lessons for at

in She played and sang
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Kate Bowan
and
Paul A. Pickering

, There never was a dame like the young Mrs. BRAND! Spell-bound stand the rustics; she’s won the whole throng! To the lady they’ve given their votes ‘for a song.’ ‘’Twill be ours, will the seat – ’tis the plot I have planned! Oh, Music hath charms!’ – exclaimed young Mrs. BRAND. Punch (25 July 1891

in Sounds of liberty
Vocal expressions in oral cultures

This book focuses on vocal expressions in the borderland between song and speech. It spans across several linguistic and musical milieus in societies where oral transmission of culture dominates. ‘Vocal expression’ is an alternative word for ‘song’ which is free from bias based on cultural and research-related traditions. The borderland between song and speech is a segment of the larger continuum that extends from speech to song. These vocal expressions are endangered to the same degree as the languages they represent. Perspectives derived from ethnomusicology, prosody, syntax, and semantics are combined in the research, in which performance templates serve as an analytical tool. The focus is on the techniques that make performance possible and on the transmission of these techniques. The performance templates serve to organize the vocal expression of words by combining musical and linguistic conventions. It is shown that all the cultures studied have principles for organizing these parameters; but each does this in its own unique way while meeting a number of basic needs on the part of human society, particularly communal interaction and interaction with the spirit world. A working method is developed that makes it possible to gain qualitative knowledge from a large body of material within a comparatively limited period of time.

Jeffrey Richards

It was song that brought the Empire into the home. There were two staples of song in the second half of the nineteenth century: the drawing-room ballad and the music-hall song. It is sometimes said that the former was middle class and the latter working class, but this is an oversimplification. The drawing-room ballad was written for and aimed at the middle-class drawing-room but

in Imperialism and music
Gillian Dooley

Songs of the British Isles Most of the songs in Jane Austen’s collection are in English, though they often draw on subjects beyond the borders of England, sometimes as far away as Serbia or India, whether they are theatre pieces or stand-alone songs. Austen had many of these exotic pieces, but she had ‘genuinely’ English songs in her collection as well – English in the sense of being written by English composers in English, and set, implicitly, in England, or at least not dealing explicitly with exotic

in She played and sang