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Experimental radio plays in the postwar period

Tuning in to the neo-avant-garde offers the first in-depth study of the radio play’s significance for the neo-avant-garde. In the postwar period, radio began to function as a site of artistic experimentation for the literary neo-avant-garde, especially in the form of the radio play. In the wake of the historical avant-garde, the neo-avant-garde had a strong interest in aural media, in the seemingly autonomous power of sound and voice. Therefore, it is not surprising that postwar avant-garde artists and literary writers in particular all across Europe, the US and the UK started to experiment with the radio play. Neo-avant-garde artists actively engaged with newly created studios and platforms in the postwar period. The contributions to this book examine how the radiophonic neo-avant-garde stages political questions and acknowledges its own ideological structure, while taking into account the public nature of radio. Alongside these cultural and political contexts, the book also reflects on intermedial and material issues to analyse how they have impacted artistic production in different parts of the world. Specific attention is paid to how artists explored the creative affordances of radio and the semiotics of auditory storytelling through electroacoustic manipulation, stereophonic positioning, montage and mixing, while also probing the ways in which they experimented in related genres and media such as music, sound poetry and theatre, questioning the boundaries between them. Because of its exclusive focus on the audiophonic realm, the book offers a valuable new perspective on the continuing debate surrounding the neo-avant-garde and its relationship with the historical avant-garde.

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Rethinking the audio-visual contract
Ming-Yuen S. Ma

cinema and media studies. Second, it diversifies the deafening homogeneity of existing discourses and practices regarding sound in art through careful audition and amplification of marginalized auralities on race, gender, sexuality, indigeneity, colonialism, nationalism, imperialism, violence, and the politics of space. There is no soundtrack is not a book about sound art. Rather, this is a book about sound in art, and also sound in media. This book is an in-depth exercise in acoustic praxis: to think through sound. It analyzes how audio and visual elements interact

in There is no soundtrack
Recorded sound and the state of audio play on post-‘golden age’ US network radio
Harry Heuser

plays of the 1950s that sets them apart from the experimental radio plays of the 1930s as well as from the emerging ‘audio art’ of the time? And how might a belated engagement with them contribute to the discourse on the avant-garde from which they are generally excluded? I shall consider this expansive brace of questions in relation to the state-of-the-art recording technology of the 1950s that, adopted and adapted by artists such as John Cage and Nam June Paik, not only played an important role in the evolution of sound art but also revolutionised network

in Tuning in to the neo-avant-garde
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

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Author: Rachael Gilmour

At a time when monolingualist claims for the importance of ‘speaking English’ to the national order continue louder than ever, even as language diversity is increasingly part of contemporary British life, literature becomes a space to consider the terms of linguistic belonging. Bad English examines writers including Tom Leonard, James Kelman, Suhayl Saadi, Raman Mundair, Daljit Nagra, Xiaolu Guo, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, and Caroline Bergvall, who engage multilingually, experimentally, playfully, and ambivalently with English’s power. Considering their invented vernaculars and mixed idioms, their dramatised scenes of languaging – languages learned or lost, acts of translation, scenes of speaking, the exposure and racialised visibility of accent – it argues for a growing field of contemporary literature in Britain pre-eminently concerned with language’s power dynamics, its aesthetic potentialities, and its prosthetic strangeness. Drawing on insights from applied linguistics and translation studies as well as literary scholarship, Bad English explores contemporary arguments about language in Britain – in debates about citizenship or education, in the media or on Twitter, in Home Office policy and asylum legislation – as well as the ways they are taken up in literature. It uncovers both an antagonistic and a productive interplay between language politics and literary form, tracing writers’ articulation of linguistic alienation and ambivalence, as well as the productivity and making-new of radical language practices. Doing so, it refutes the view that language difference and language politics are somehow irrelevant to contemporary Britain and instead argues for their constitutive centrality to the work of novelists and poets whose inside/outside relationship to English in its institutionalised forms is the generative force of their writing.

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Works discussed Radio and sound art What Is Your Name, 1986. Reference: Paul Carter, Absolute Rhythm: Works for Minor Radio, Aberystwyth, UK: Performance Research Publications, 2020, 39–54 . Scarlatti, 1986. Reference: Carter, Absolute Rhythm, 75–92 . Remember Me, 1988. Reference: Carter, Absolute Rhythm, 93–108 . Mirror States, 1989, unrealised site-specific installation, 1989. Reference: Paul Carter

in Translations, an autoethnography
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Listening to installation and performance
Ming-Yuen S. Ma

problems of confinement and curators have to find inventive ways to prevent the noise from one installation bleeding into other rooms.’ 4 Christian Marclay echoes some of Rogers’s point in a more critical tone: Sound is not easily contained. It naturally invades space, seeps under doors and through walls. This is why sound art is often kept out of exhibition spaces where it is heard to interfere with the act of viewing. Or, when it is included, it is isolated from the resonating chamber of the ‘white cube’ and consigned to soundproofed cubicles or secondary architectural

in There is no soundtrack
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Posthuman sound ecologies in the neo-avant-garde
Jesper Olsson

prefigured domestic phonographic practices. Such more-than-human art-and-media entanglements would proliferate in acoustic arts – for example in music, sound art, sound poetry and Hörspiele – during the period in focus here. And they were not restricted to humans and animals, in a narrower sense, but included humans and various technological ensembles as well as natural or planetary phenomena, as Douglas Kahn has shown in his investigations into the weirder sound regions of whistlers and other atmospheric phenomena in Earth Sound Earth Signal ( 2013 ). This is also

in Tuning in to the neo-avant-garde
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The acoustic neo-avant-gardes between literature and radio
Inge Arteel, Lars Bernaerts, Siebe Bluijs, and Pim Verhulst

podcast format flourished from the 1990s onwards, which not only challenged the traditional role of radio studios and broadcasting services as facilitators and disseminators, but also stretched the terminology from ‘radio play’ or ‘radio art’ to ‘sound art’ or ‘audio drama’. In order to study this dynamic as well, the present volume expands the accepted time frame and includes the kind of formal experimentation that continues and expands the views and strategies of the historical avant-gardes. Goals and outline of this volume This volume reveals the fundamental

in Tuning in to the neo-avant-garde
An audionarratological analysis of Andreas Ammer and FM Einheit’s Lost & Found: Das Paradies
Jarmila Mildorf

freedom to either negate previous parameters of art – as modernism and the historical avant-garde did – or to negate those very negations. We shall see that it is this freedom that may lead to the combination or co-occurrence of seemingly incongruent features – incongruent only if measured against a fixed set of expectations about avant-garde art. Before I move on to my analysis of Lost & Found , a few words are in order concerning my methodology: audionarratology. Close listening and audionarratology Sound art poses great methodological challenges when it comes to

in Tuning in to the neo-avant-garde