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Moments in television

In television scholarship, sound and image have been attended to in different ways, but image has historically dominated. The chapters gathered here attend to both: they weigh the impact and significance of specific choices of sound and image, explore their interactions, and assess their roles in establishing meaning and style. The contributors address a wide range of technical and stylistic elements relating to the television image. They consider production design choices, the spatial organisation of the television frame and how camera movements position and reposition parts of the visible world. They explore mise-en-scène, landscapes and backgrounds, settings and scenery, and costumes and props. They attend to details of actors’ performances, as well as lighting design and patterns of colour and scale. As regards sound, each chapter distinguishes different components on a soundtrack, delineating diegetic from non-diegetic sound, and evaluating the roles of elements such as music, dialogue, voice-over, bodily sounds, performed and non-performed sounds. Attending to sound design, contributors address motifs, repetition and rhythm in both music and non-musical sound. Consideration is also given to the significance of quietness, the absence of sounds, and silence. Programmes studied comprise The Twilight Zone, Inspector Morse, Children of the Stones, Dancing on the Edge, Road, Twin Peaks: The Return, Bodyguard, The Walking Dead and Mad Men. Sound and image are evaluated across these examples from a wide range of television forms, formats and genres, which includes series, serial and one-off dramas, children’s programmes, science fiction, thrillers and detective shows.

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The rush of the ride
Maike Helmers

rush of the ride. Sound: sublimely manipulative The serial's editing 4 was complex and fluid, whilst sound design and music converged in a darkly artful masterpiece. We would argue that the creative and evocative use of sound throughout the serial played a particularly important role in Bodyguard 's appeal and popular success. That this is not widely acknowledged in its critical reception is unsurprising, given the endemic neglect of sound in so much writing about film and

in Sound / image
Vocal performance, gesture and technology in Spanish film
Tom Whittaker

which is vividly illuminated through the career of López Vázquez. Taking as its premise Pamela Robertson Wojcik’s assertion that ‘screen acting is constructed as much by sound design as by labour’ (2006: 73), the chapter aims to show how López Vázquez’s varied vocal performances illuminated the shifting location of the voice in Spanish film between these periods. In particular, it aims to show how sound design –​namely the use of the microphone, whether within the dubbing studio or on location –​not only influenced his various idioms and idiolects of vocal performance

in Performance and Spanish film
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Derek Schilling

restraint undergird Rohmer’s work in its entirety. In addressing cinematography, mise en scène, sound design, and music in synoptic fashion, this chapter aims to show why Rohmer’s deceptively prosaic mode of presentation is ultimately so effective in sustaining and critiquing cinematic illusion at one and the same time. Less unassuming than it looks, the filmmaker’s practice runs slightly against the grain of what Noël Burch

in Eric Rohmer
Moments in television

This collection appraises an eclectic selection of programmes, exploring and weighing their particular achievements and their contribution to the television landscape. It does so via a simultaneous engagement with the concepts of complexity and simplicity. This book considers how complexity, which is currently attracting much interest in TV studies, impacts upon the practice of critical and evaluative interpretation. It engages reflectively and critically with a range of recent work on televisual complexity, expands existing conceptions of complex TV and directs attention to neglected sources and types of complexity. It also reassesses simplicity, a relatively neglected category in TV criticism, as a helpful criterion for evaluation. It seeks out and reappraises the importance of simple qualities to particular TV works, and explores how simplicity might be revalued as a potentially positive and valuable aesthetic feature. Finally, the book illuminates the creative achievements that arise from balancing simplicity with complexity.

The contributors to this collection come from diverse areas of TV studies, bringing with them myriad interests, expertise and perspectives. All chapters undertake close analysis of selected moments in television, considering a wide range of stylistic elements including mise-en-scène, spatial organisation and composition, scripting, costuming, characterisation, performance, lighting and sound design, colour and patterning. The range of television works addressed is similarly broad, covering UK and US drama, comedy-drama, sitcom, animation, science fiction, adaptation and advertisement. Programmes comprise The Handmaid’s Tale, House of Cards, Father Ted, Rick and Morty, Killing Eve, The Wire, Veep, Doctor Who, Vanity Fair and The Long Wait.

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, McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery, Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia, 2 December 2020–2 May 2021. Reference: Carter, Absolute Rhythm, 55–74 . Sound installation Named in the Margin (with Sound Design Studio, Melbourne), 1990. Location: Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney, New South Wales. Reference: Paul Carter, ‘Performing History: the Hyde Park Barracks Voice Collages’, Transition, nos 36/37, 1992, 5–11 . Columbus Echo (with Australian Broadcasting Corporation & Sound Design Studio), 1992. Proposed location: Acquario

in Translations, an autoethnography
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

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Sound / image
Jonathan Bignell, Sarah Cardwell, and Lucy Fife Donaldson

design and patterns of colour and scale. As regards sound, each chapter carefully distinguishes different components on a soundtrack, delineating diegetic from non-diegetic sound, and evaluating the roles of elements such as music, dialogue, voice-over, bodily sounds, performed and non-performed sounds. Attending to sound design, contributors address motifs, repetition and rhythm in both music and non-musical sound. Consideration is also given to the significance of quietness, the absence of sounds, and silence. Across the volume as a whole there is a tendency for

in Sound / image
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Complexity / simplicity
Sarah Cardwell, Jonathan Bignell, and Lucy Fife Donaldson

experience: a complex work of art is one, perhaps, that makes demands, that stretches its audience intellectually, emotionally or even morally. The concept is broad enough to enable a wide range of approaches and emphases. One might begin by seeking to uncover complexity in any number of elements of a television programme: narrative, character, performance, mise-en-scène, style, sound design, emotional, political and moral timbre. Recent work on complexity in TV, though, which attends closely to the achievements of individual programmes, has tended to foreground complexity

in Complexity / simplicity
Richard Allen

Remi Gassmann, during the production of the film. Thus, I shall argue that, while Hitchcock’s use of electronic sound is certainly experimental in the sense that it is pushing the boundaries of how sound is used and conceived in cinema, it is mistaken to think that Hitchcock used the electronic sound in The Birds primarily because it was electronic. Rather, Hitchcock enthusiastically embraced electronic sound because it allowed him to create the dense layering of sound effects that he wanted for the film, one that anticipates modern sound design. The purpose served

in Partners in suspense