Search results

Abstract only
Placing the Irish and Scots in Colonial Australia

This book takes two of the most influential minority groups of white settlers in the British Empire—the Irish and the Scots—and explores how they imagined themselves within the landscapes of its farthest reaches, the Australian colonies of Victoria and New South Wales. Using letters and diaries as well as records of collective activities such as committee meetings, parades and dinners, it examines how the Irish and Scots built new identities as settlers in the unknown spaces of Empire. Utilizing critical geographical theories of ‘place’ as the site of memory and agency, the book considers how Irish and Scots settlers grounded their sense of belonging in the imagined landscapes of south-east Australia. Emphasizing the complexity of colonial identity formation and the ways in which this was spatially constructed, it challenges conventional understandings of the Irish and Scottish presence in Australia. The opening chapters locate the book's themes and perspectives within a survey of the existing historical and geographical literature on empire and diaspora. These pay particular attention to the ‘new’ imperial history and to alternative transnational and ‘located’ understandings of diasporic consciousness. Subsequent chapters work within these frames and examine the constructions of place evinced by Irish and Scottish emigrants during the outward voyage and subsequent processes of pastoral and urban settlement, and in religious observance.

Abstract only
Lindsay J. Proudfoot and Dianne P. Hall

’. 11 We focus on the experience of Irish and, for comparison, Scottish emigrants in south-east Australia – particularly Victoria – during the period between the 1840s, when widespread assisted emigration from Britain to Australia began, and the Federation of the Australian colonies in 1901. This was a period of profound social, political, economic and environmental change within Australia, and of

in Imperial spaces
Lindsay J. Proudfoot and Dianne P. Hall

south-east Australia appeared complete. Despite the best efforts of the Colonial Office, the Wakefieldian principle of setting a minimum price for land to encourage adequately capitalised agricultural settlement had been adopted only in South Australia. 17 In New South Wales, governors such as Sir George Gipps (1838–46) realised the importance of pastoralism to the economy and strove – often in the

in Imperial spaces
Abstract only
Indigenous histories, settler colonies and Queen Victoria
Maria Nugent and Sarah Carter

... reflected the different stages and depths of the experience of colonisation and British cultural hegemony’. Contrast this with the single, collective interpretation of the Queen’s apparent role in land matters that was shared over a quite large geographical area by Aboriginal people in south-east Australia, as Nugent’s chapter makes clear. Other historical differences registered within the

in Mistress of everything
Australian Aboriginal interpretations of Queen Victoria, 1881–2011
Maria Nugent

Melbourne newspaper, is among the earliest records of Aboriginal people in the south-east Australian colonies of Victoria and New South Wales articulating the history of Aboriginal reserves created in the second half of the nineteenth century in these terms. 5 His sparse history applied to the Coranderrk settlement specifically, but in time Aboriginal people in other settlements

in Mistress of everything
Abstract only
Lindsay J. Proudfoot and Dianne P. Hall

was widely and evenly dispersed in colonial south-east Australia offers little intellectual purchase on the performative narratives of place and identity which are our present concern. Some regional analyses of Irish and Scottish settlement offer rather more insight, despite their underlying empiricism. For example, Malcolm Campbell’s The Kingdom of the Ryans , his account of Irish settlement in

in Imperial spaces
Abstract only
Lindsay J. Proudfoot and Dianne P. Hall

alcohol use, and this is likely to have been a factor in her alleged assailants’ acquittal. 116 Seemingly, for Mary Honan the semiotic spaces of Stawell were relentlessly negative and threatening. Summary Like its pastoral counterpart, the urban performance of place by Scots and Irish settlers in south-east Australia was characteristically ambiguous and layered in meaning. The

in Imperial spaces